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Messy final sear for rib roast


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#1 Junkbot

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Posted 17 December 2012 - 07:35 AM

I cooked my rib roast at a low temp for a many hours. I take it out to rest while I crank up the oven to 550F. When I put the roast back in for the final sear, after 5 minutes, there is a crazy amount of smoke coming out of the oven (I see flecks of oil catching fire on the heating element as they're launched from the roast). After ~9 minutes or so, the kitchen is completely filled with smoke. The roast was fine (good sear on the outside), but there was an unworldly amount of smoke, and the inside of my oven will definitely need cleaning. Any way to reduce the splatter when searing as the last step of a rib roast?

I've cooked steak in the oven before (similar method; stove->oven) which produced some smoke and splatter, but the roast was insane.

#2 David Ross

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Posted 17 December 2012 - 08:24 AM

I typically blast the roast at high temperature on the front end of the cooking process, then reduce the temp and slow-roast until the meat is the desired doneness. I put a bit of water in the bottom of the roasting pan to contain the amount of smoke. Not enough water to steam the meat, just enough to create a bath for the fat to drip into without creating a flashpoint for smoke.

#3 Paul Bacino

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Posted 17 December 2012 - 09:40 AM

Or use one of these!!

http://www.amazon.co...sl_45jzf654fk_b
Its good to have Morels

#4 JBailey

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Posted 17 December 2012 - 09:43 AM

Was the roast patted dry? I generally sear quickly in a pan after I have dried the meat out of the bag and then put the pan in the hot oven.
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#5 Junkbot

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Posted 17 December 2012 - 10:00 AM

I typically blast the roast at high temperature on the front end of the cooking process, then reduce the temp and slow-roast until the meat is the desired doneness. I put a bit of water in the bottom of the roasting pan to contain the amount of smoke. Not enough water to steam the meat, just enough to create a bath for the fat to drip into without creating a flashpoint for smoke.

I might have to try the water trick, although wouldn't the water boil off pretty quick?

Was the roast patted dry? I generally sear quickly in a pan after I have dried the meat out of the bag and then put the pan in the hot oven.

I do the sear after the long roast so that the surface of the meat takes a good char due to it being so dry.

Edited by Junkbot, 17 December 2012 - 10:00 AM.


#6 Baselerd

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Posted 17 December 2012 - 10:00 AM

A small amount of water in the dripping pan is what you need.

#7 ChrisTaylor

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Posted 17 December 2012 - 01:22 PM

Air dry it in the fridge for a couple days then give it an initial sear.

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#8 Mark Donnelly

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Posted 18 December 2012 - 10:48 AM

Blowtorch.

#9 Junkbot

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Posted 18 December 2012 - 10:58 AM

Blowtorch.

How even is the sear when you do this? I find that torching the meat produces a bunch of tiny burnt flecks rather than an even browning from pan/oven.

#10 Mjx

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Posted 18 December 2012 - 12:37 PM

I also favour a low temp followed by high temperature sear for roasts, but I've found that if I deglaze the pan carefully before the sear, I get little or not smoke. Normally, however, sloth circumstances dictate that I just deal with the smoke.

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#11 rotuts

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Posted 18 December 2012 - 01:41 PM

to get the true 'torch' effect require a little more time and a great deal of patience.

after all, Its Time To Eat ! most torchings that do not understand this get 'Bits of Burnt' not so bad but not browning.

#12 Kerry Beal

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Posted 18 December 2012 - 06:26 PM

I'd take mine outside to a really hot Big Green Egg and give it a quick minute or so on each side. All the smoke it out of the house.

#13 Junkbot

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Posted 19 December 2012 - 06:06 AM

I'd take mine outside to a really hot Big Green Egg and give it a quick minute or so on each side. All the smoke it out of the house.

Kudos to you if you live in the Midwest, although we've been having quite the mild winter so far...

#14 Kerry Beal

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Posted 19 December 2012 - 08:07 AM


I'd take mine outside to a really hot Big Green Egg and give it a quick minute or so on each side. All the smoke it out of the house.

Kudos to you if you live in the Midwest, although we've been having quite the mild winter so far...


Canada actually - I use the BGE all winter long - get hubby to shovel me a path.

#15 Crouton

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Posted 19 December 2012 - 09:11 AM

Two options I would recommend - ad hoc's blow torch technique or the grill to oven method. The purpose of the blow torch is NOT to give you a nice finished sear. It will look spotty and turn the meat pale and gray, not exactly pleasing to the eye. The trick is using the blow torch BEFORE you put the roast in the oven, while the meat is completely raw. That little bit of spotty sear achieved with the blowtorch is greatly magnified as it slowly roasts in the oven. By the time it's ready you will have a wonderful crusty exterior with no need for final searing. Seems weird but it works. That's all i do these days.

The other method is sear off the roast on your grill, outside before switching over to the oven.

http://ruhlman.com/2...cook-prime-rib/

Edited by Crouton, 19 December 2012 - 09:12 AM.


#16 Junkbot

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Posted 19 December 2012 - 09:25 AM

The other method is sear off the roast on your grill, outside before switching over to the oven.

http://ruhlman.com/2...cook-prime-rib/

My problem was the smoke indoors. If I was going to sear with a grill, I would still do it after the bake since the indoor smoke isn't a factor anymore.

#17 jorach

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Posted 19 December 2012 - 01:37 PM

I'm a big fan of air drying things in the fridge.

#18 rotuts

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Posted 19 December 2012 - 01:46 PM

Big Time Prime ( older days True Prime ) does best in the Slow Oven after its 'browned'

I did this for many years and back then it was 'true prime'

I never though back then to leave the Roast in the refirg for 7 days to 'age"

#19 Paul Bacino

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Posted 19 December 2012 - 08:48 PM

I have dry aged many of rib primals..and a cooked dry aged end ain't bad. Back to the question...my weed burner was a bit faciuous (sp ).. But on the faster end to a blow tourch.

I am fortunate to have a downstairs oven...which I will use for a final sear...it keeps all the smoke fire and brimstone from us up stairs.
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#20 tim

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Posted 20 December 2012 - 10:46 AM

There are a number of advantages for the low roast before the finishing sear. These include the ability to slow-smoke, better internal temperature control, faster searing, and carving immediately after cooking.

Then messy sear can easily be avoided by resting the roast on your carving board for up to an hour. You can then remove all grease from the roasting pan. The roast is then seared with no smoke and no spattering grease.

Tim