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Coffee Makers


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#61 Kerry Beal

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Posted 13 January 2014 - 09:32 PM

I ran into a fellow the other day at a thrift store - he was looking at all the electric coffee makers trying to find one to make just one or two cups.  I pointed out a nice little french press to him - he left a happy man!


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#62 andiesenji

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Posted 14 January 2014 - 12:51 PM

Here are two of the Sunbeam Coffeemasters which still make great coffee.

The one that started it all - the C20 A  (Note the iconic incised Art Deco design that Sunbeam used for many years.)

Sunbeam C 20-A-00.JPG

And here it is in action with the water siphoned into the upper chamber and bubbling away.

(I didn't use any coffee in the demonstration - just showing how it works automatically)

Sunbeam C 20-A4 bubbling.JPG

 

And this is the next evolution of the Coffeemaster, the  C30

SB CM C30.JPG

 

And this is the timeline of these models:

Timeline of SB 20 & 30.png

 

I had a lot of fun collecting these and the many other coffee brewers and machines I've written about on my blog, but now it is time to pass them on to others who are as fanatical about coffee as I am.

(I've finally triumphed over the "collecting bug" :rolleyes: - more or less!)

 

Note the gap between 1940 and 1948.  Sunbeam, like many other manufacturers, changed over to war production in 1941 and after the war it took a few years to get the factories re-tooled because there was still shortage of materials but once that production got rolling again, American industry was at the top of the heap in the entire world.  Too bad we can't get back to that today.


Edited by andiesenji, 14 January 2014 - 12:59 PM.

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"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett
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#63 rotuts

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Posted 14 January 2014 - 12:56 PM

Way Cool.

 

I especially like the braided electrical connector.

 

I remember similar ones ( electrical cords ) when i was small :  they went to the 'Percolator' and I was fascinated by the color combos.

 

that was the '50's by the way 

 

:biggrin:


Edited by rotuts, 14 January 2014 - 12:58 PM.

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#64 Norm Matthews

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Posted 14 January 2014 - 01:41 PM

Here are the non electric-manual versions of the vacuum coffee pots. Both have cloth covered porcelain filters as well as the glass filters that were extra.  They will break if used on an electric coil stove unless those wire M's or W's are placed between the element and the bottom of the pot. One is Silex, the other is Pyrex.  The small opening of the Pyrex makes it a bother to clean.  Looks like the electric ones that andiesenji has are easier to use.

 

DSCN1150_zps4a12ed58.jpg


Edited by Norm Matthews, 14 January 2014 - 01:42 PM.

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#65 HungryC

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Posted 14 January 2014 - 02:34 PM

Ugh, we had a vaccuum stovetop pot (can't recall the mfgr).  The glass was very thin & fragile, it was a PITA to clean, and I thought the resulting coffee was thin and insipid (though some might term it "clean").  Boy, was I happy when it broke.


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#66 Kerry Beal

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Posted 14 January 2014 - 04:50 PM

I have about half a dozen of the stainless Cory vacuum pots and probably 20 of the nice little stainless filters that go in them.  I sold a bunch of the filters on e-bay - very popular!


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#67 andiesenji

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Posted 14 January 2014 - 09:10 PM

I remember when most restaurants had vacuum pots, usually the 12-cup Nicro.  Then Bunn introduced the automatic drip machine and all those lovely Nicro were retired.  I have a couple in storage, along with their hot plates.  They were not automatic, but they made great coffee. 

At one time Farmer Brothers Coffee supplied a new Nicro vacuum pot with every 50 pounds of coffee. 

We used that coffee in my mom's bakery, back in the '50s (coffee for back door visitors - like the state police and the local constable) and it was a good day when the Farmers man arrived with our order and presented us with a new Nicro for being loyal customers.  Here's an 8-cup Nicro  the bottom of the 12 cup was wider at the bottom.

 

I also have several of the glass vac pots, most with their own "stoves" (little hot plates) that were very popular and stylish in the 1930s.

The ones I have are a bit older than the ones pictured, although I do have a couple that are contemporary to those.

 

Silex 8 cup.JPG

 

Silex 4 cup 2.JPG


Edited by andiesenji, 14 January 2014 - 09:13 PM.

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"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett
My blog:Books,Cooks,Gadgets&Gardening

#68 Smithy

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Posted 15 January 2014 - 07:16 AM

I still don't understand how the vacuum pots work. Are they basically the same principle as a percolator?

Edited by Smithy, 15 January 2014 - 07:20 AM.

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#69 andiesenji

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Posted 15 January 2014 - 08:02 AM

I still don't understand how the vacuum pots work. Are they basically the same principle as a percolator?

No, not at all like a percolator which repeatedly sends water up a center shaft over coffee grounds which drip back down and then that liquid is sent up again and again until the coffee is "done."

 

A vacuum pot has two sections that have a good seal between and when the water in the bottom section is heated, it expands and some turns into steam which forces the liquid up into the upper chamber, which has been loaded with the required amount of coffee grounds. 

The bubbling of the water mixes the grounds, although sometimes one needs to stir with a spoon (long handled for safety) and if automatic, the head under the bottom section is turned from high to low and after a few minutes, the temperature drops enough that the pressure drops and the vacuum in the lower chamber draws the liquid back down, leaving the coffee grounds behind (if the filter is working properly) in the upper chamber, which can then be removed (with care) and set aside while the coffee is served from the bottom which is equipped with a pouring spout.

 

Coffee Geek has an illustrated article on how they work.   And JitterBuzz has several pages on coffee apparatus. 

 

Over the years I have known several men who would never consider stepping into the kitchen to do ANYTHING but when they discovered the technical intricacies of vacuum pots, began fiddling with them to get the brew "just right" and then branched out to various other coffee machines, espresso machines and the accessories.   One wife, to whom I sold a Silex about fifteen years ago, claimed that I had, "created a monster" when her husband delved into it.

Now they have a top-of-the-line superautomatic espresso machine, roasters, grinders and several other coffee brewers and "extractors" and they have taken three vacations to coffee-producing areas.  (Prior to all that, he drank instant coffee...)


Edited by andiesenji, 15 January 2014 - 08:11 AM.

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"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett
My blog:Books,Cooks,Gadgets&Gardening

#70 Kerry Beal

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Posted 15 January 2014 - 09:13 AM

Yeah - love the stainless pots when it comes time to take the top segment off the vacuum pot.  No worries about dropping hot glass or where to put the darn thing.


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