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#91 Jason Perlow

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Posted 01 January 2013 - 11:20 AM

Yes, he was just newly diagnosed, so we are still in the "finding everything out" phase of things. I always made basmati, or jasmine. My rice cooker broke during a brown rice experiment. :wacko: I now need to go up to the local Asian hypermarket they have here and find the red and black rices. How does the cooking of red and black differ from the long grain whites or even brown?


Like brown rices they are whole grain unhulled rices. So you have to cook them longer just like brown rices.
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#92 Jason Perlow

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Posted 01 January 2013 - 11:29 AM

Also, any Chinese or Asian stir fry dish can be served atop alternative hi protein whole grains, not just brown rices. We've done this a LOT in our house using quinoa or the whole grain mixes you can buy at Whole Foods and other health food stores. There's a lot of photos on my blog and in my flickr feed with stuff done this way. Wheat Berries, Kamut, lots of stuff out there adapts very well to Chinese cooking and other cuisines that are rice dependent.

Posted Image

This is a stir fry served over barley grains

Posted Image

This is an "Egg Beater" egg foo young (griddle fried with only a small amount of oil) over Quinoa

Posted Image

Shrimp and Tofu in Hot Bean Sauce served over a Korean-style grain/bean mix.

Edited by Jason Perlow, 01 January 2013 - 11:33 AM.

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#93 rotuts

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Posted 01 January 2013 - 12:03 PM

I have not done many BR dishes, but Im moving in that direction.

If your Rice Cooker 'gave up the spirit' consider a fuzzy replacement:

first this book:

http://www.amazon.co...s=ultimate rice

it might be at your library!

then a 10 cup Fuzzy of your choice:

you will never do 10 Cups of rice, but you will use the extra 'head-room' for 'mix-ins'

best of luck!

#94 Jason Perlow

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Posted 01 January 2013 - 12:09 PM

We haven't killed our rice cooker yet, we've had it probably 10 years. Knock on wood. It's a pretty cheap model, no fuzzy logic or anything like that.

Yeah the mix ins are great. We frequently throw in chicken stock, curry pastes, sofritos, spice mixes, herbs, various different things. Helps break up the monotony.
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#95 huiray

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Posted 01 January 2013 - 01:23 PM

...
We frequently throw in chicken stock, curry pastes, sofritos, spice mixes, herbs, various different things. Helps break up the monotony.


Tried "Lap Cheong" of various kinds? A classic add-in.

#96 nickrey

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Posted 01 January 2013 - 01:25 PM

Rice was a main staple in our house, since my DH has been diagnosed diabetic we had to back off the rice.

The type of rice can help here. White rice is a high glycaemic index food but Basmati rice is only moderate. Try switching your rices and having it in moderation rather than cutting it out altogether.

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#97 Jason Perlow

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Posted 01 January 2013 - 01:26 PM


...
We frequently throw in chicken stock, curry pastes, sofritos, spice mixes, herbs, various different things. Helps break up the monotony.


Tried "Lap Cheong" of various kinds? A classic add-in.


Lap Cheong and Char Siu, absolutely
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#98 Bojana

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Posted 01 January 2013 - 02:14 PM

Recently I tried a microwave method for sticky rice. 10 mins upfront soaking and 8-10 mins in microwave and the result was way better than when i steamed it. But still not as good as what i remember eating in laos, steamed in some kind of leaves...

#99 Keith_W

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Posted 01 January 2013 - 05:16 PM

How does the cooking of red and black differ from the long grain whites or even brown?


Both types of rice are used in Chinese cooking.

Red rice actually comes in several varieties, some are glutinous, some are not. Some are more polished than others. I'm sorry I don't know the names, but the most common variety of red rice found here is the less polished glutinous variety. This means that the fibrous layer is still attached to the grain of rice, which itself will turn to goop when cooked. I am not aware of anybody cooking this like "normal" rice, although I am sure it possible. Its most common use is to make a kind of Chinese "sweet porridge", usually mixed in with some red bean and dried mandarin peel, and eaten as a dessert.

The black rice I have found also comes in two varieties. One is "wild black rice", the other is a polished black rice. Polished black rice is slightly glutinous and turns purple when cooked. As for "wild black rice", I bought some because I thought it was unusual. Bad mistake - this rice took forever to cook, and even then the husk was extremely chewy. I will confess right now that I have no idea how to cook wild black rice. I have some left, perhaps I will put it in the pressure cooker.

With any unfamiliar rice, it is best to err on adding too little water and undercooking, rather than too much water and overcooking. You can always add water and steam it some more. If you have added too much water and the rice has broken down, you will not be able to save it.
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#100 haresfur

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Posted 02 January 2013 - 01:08 AM

I can eat rice three times a day if they let me!

Not so odd - billions of people do! :smile:
It's almost never bad to feed someone.

#101 liuzhou

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Posted 02 January 2013 - 01:16 AM

Both types of rice are used in Chinese cooking.


But not often.

The black rice I have found also comes in two varieties.


In fact, black rice comes in just as many varieties as red rice.

I usually buy a non-glutinous type which also turns more purple when cooked. I mentioned it and showed a picture on the first page of this thread. Post 20.

Edited by liuzhou, 02 January 2013 - 02:03 AM.


#102 CKatCook

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Posted 02 January 2013 - 11:08 AM

How does the cooking of red and black differ from the long grain whites or even brown?


Both types of rice are used in Chinese cooking.

Red rice actually comes in several varieties, some are glutinous, some are not. Some are more polished than others. I'm sorry I don't know the names, but the most common variety of red rice found here is the less polished glutinous variety. This means that the fibrous layer is still attached to the grain of rice, which itself will turn to goop when cooked. I am not aware of anybody cooking this like "normal" rice, although I am sure it possible. Its most common use is to make a kind of Chinese "sweet porridge", usually mixed in with some red bean and dried mandarin peel, and eaten as a dessert.


That sounds so good! Are you talking red bean paste, or just red beans?
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#103 CKatCook

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Posted 02 January 2013 - 11:12 AM

Also, any Chinese or Asian stir fry dish can be served atop alternative hi protein whole grains, not just brown rices. We've done this a LOT in our house using quinoa or the whole grain mixes you can buy at Whole Foods and other health food stores. There's a lot of photos on my blog and in my flickr feed with stuff done this way. Wheat Berries, Kamut, lots of stuff out there adapts very well to Chinese cooking and other cuisines that are rice dependent.

Posted Image

This is a stir fry served over barley grains

Posted Image

This is an "Egg Beater" egg foo young (griddle fried with only a small amount of oil) over Quinoa

Posted Image

Shrimp and Tofu in Hot Bean Sauce served over a Korean-style grain/bean mix.


Oh, ok, I see...that is a great idea!!
"I eat fat back, because bacon is too lean"
-overheard from a 105 year old man

"The only time to eat diet food is while waiting for the steak to cook" - Julia Child

#104 CKatCook

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Posted 02 January 2013 - 11:15 AM

I have not done many BR dishes, but Im moving in that direction.

If your Rice Cooker 'gave up the spirit' consider a fuzzy replacement:

first this book:

http://www.amazon.co...s=ultimate rice

it might be at your library!

then a 10 cup Fuzzy of your choice:

you will never do 10 Cups of rice, but you will use the extra 'head-room' for 'mix-ins'

best of luck!


I have this cookbook! It is wonderful! I had a nice big 10 cupper, that is what I am looking for again.
"I eat fat back, because bacon is too lean"
-overheard from a 105 year old man

"The only time to eat diet food is while waiting for the steak to cook" - Julia Child

#105 rotuts

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Posted 02 January 2013 - 11:38 AM

make sure your next 10-cupper has a cycle that browns the bottom of the rice. on mine its called "komado" cant say if all this. sort of an imination 'persian' rice feature.