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Cooking & Curing from "Charcuterie": Part 5

Charcuterie Cookbook

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546 replies to this topic

#541 takadi

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Posted 24 January 2014 - 11:27 AM

Alright I have some duck prosciutto in the curing fridge and I've noticed three kinds of molds growing. One is a fuzzy white mold. Another is a dark green mold that sort of looks like algae (there was some meat to meat contact at this area so it was kind of wet). The last one is a spotty white mold that is more opaque. From what I've read so far, which isn't much, white molds are okay and green molds are iffy...I've rubbed them off with some a salt and vinegar solution, but I'm wondering if it's okay to just let those molds go wild



#542 Richard Audet

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Posted 28 July 2014 - 11:36 PM

G'day all.

 

A couple of questions and a comment.

 

Q.1 for Doc-G: I live in Australia as well and having a hard time (ie. entirely unsuccessful) finding a source for Bactoferm. Where do you source from?

 

Q.2 What does everyone do with all this product??? My family can plow through the bacon fairly reliably but, my god!, the quantity I see would cover us a good part of the year! Not to sound cheap but I'm reluctant to be handing all the work and expense as gifts to family and friends on a regular, ongoing basis. On the other hand, banging it out makes for good practice and opportunities for testing.

 

Comment: Boudin Noir has been removed from all plans going forward!! Wife would have my .... if ever she walked in on our kitchen looking like that! So glad it wasn't me!

 

Cheers all and thanks for all the advice throughout this (and previous charcuterie) thread.

Richard



#543 Luke

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Posted 18 August 2014 - 02:15 AM

My last batch of Bacon didn't go to plan, and I ended up leaving it in the cold smoker for too long, and it ended up very smokey.

 

I did not want to throw it away, so I cut some of the bacon up anyway (which by the way, after a month of "settling" in the freezer turned out really good).

 

But I kept one piece, and decided to dry it out. Now I didn't have a curing chamber, or anything else to control temperature, but I did have winter on my side.

 

So I wrapped it up in some cloth, and hung it in a dry place, exposed to the outside air. I forgot about it for 3 months.

 

Lardo Aug2014.JPG

 

So, here it is. Fungus and all! I wasn't sure what to make of it. I had left the skin on one side to avoid drying it out too much, and the flesh side did dry out a bit, but not as much as I expected.

 

The mould - well, if I die in a few days, it was nice knowing you all. :)

 

The taste - awesome. Just fantastic. Deep, earthy, funky, but with the salt/sweet balance of the bacon.

 

The smoke? Subtle and lingering, but fantastic.

 

The texture....soft and delicate fat, slight chewier as you get closer to the dry flesh side, but excellent in thin slices.

 

Will I do it again...Definitely!

 

Thanks

Luke

 



#544 takadi

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Posted 18 August 2014 - 10:07 AM

My last batch of Bacon didn't go to plan, and I ended up leaving it in the cold smoker for too long, and it ended up very smokey.

 

I did not want to throw it away, so I cut some of the bacon up anyway (which by the way, after a month of "settling" in the freezer turned out really good).

 

But I kept one piece, and decided to dry it out. Now I didn't have a curing chamber, or anything else to control temperature, but I did have winter on my side.

 

So I wrapped it up in some cloth, and hung it in a dry place, exposed to the outside air. I forgot about it for 3 months.

 

attachicon.gifLardo Aug2014.JPG

 

So, here it is. Fungus and all! I wasn't sure what to make of it. I had left the skin on one side to avoid drying it out too much, and the flesh side did dry out a bit, but not as much as I expected.

 

The mould - well, if I die in a few days, it was nice knowing you all. :)

 

The taste - awesome. Just fantastic. Deep, earthy, funky, but with the salt/sweet balance of the bacon.

 

The smoke? Subtle and lingering, but fantastic.

 

The texture....soft and delicate fat, slight chewier as you get closer to the dry flesh side, but excellent in thin slices.

 

Will I do it again...Definitely!

 

Thanks

Luke

 

 

That looks incredible. I got that blue green mold too when I was curing duck prosciutto. It happens when there's too much humidity, so I suspect you probably used too much cheese cloth. Don't quote me on this but I believe that mold isn't particularly dangerous. I remember seeing pictures somewhere of salumi hanging in a shop with that color mold running along the sides with mostly the safe powdery white mold. As long as you cut off most of it you should be fine (I'm still alive!). Did you eat it raw or cooked?



#545 Luke

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Posted 23 August 2014 - 04:08 PM

Eating it raw. However, I am shaving off the mould growth prior to consumption.

 

Luke



#546 nickrey

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Posted 24 August 2014 - 01:00 AM

G'day all.
 
A couple of questions and a comment.
 
Q.1 for Doc-G: I live in Australia as well and having a hard time (ie. entirely unsuccessful) finding a source for Bactoferm. Where do you source from?
 
Q.2 What does everyone do with all this product??? My family can plow through the bacon fairly reliably but, my god!, the quantity I see would cover us a good part of the year! Not to sound cheap but I'm reluctant to be handing all the work and expense as gifts to family and friends on a regular, ongoing basis. On the other hand, banging it out makes for good practice and opportunities for testing.
 
Comment: Boudin Noir has been removed from all plans going forward!! Wife would have my .... if ever she walked in on our kitchen looking like that! So glad it wasn't me!
 
Cheers all and thanks for all the advice throughout this (and previous charcuterie) thread.
Richard


Bactoferm available at this link.

Nick Reynolds, aka "nickrey"

"My doctor told me to stop having intimate dinners for four.
Unless there are three other people." Orson Welles
My eG Foodblog


#547 ChrisTaylor

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Posted 29 August 2014 - 11:39 PM

A few months ago I took a boneless pork leg roast and packed it in salt. This was my attempt at the dry-cured country ham. I left it hanging in the 'granny flat' at 'room temperature' (Melbourne autumn and winter). And today, about four and a half months down the road, I decided to give it a shot. I mean, any more, it's not like we'll have too many days at or below the temperature Ruhlman wants you to keep the ham at. I was, to be blunt, shitting myself about tasting this thing. It didn't look nasty. It smelt like dry-cured ham. Indeed, at no point in the curing process did it smell much of anything: certainly not rotten meat or anything nasty. After getting rid of the fat and digging into the ham's interior, it looked a little pink. Not as dark as the dry-cured hams you buy at delis. I was unsure whether or not this was a product of time, the meat or some sort of additive commercial ham producers use. It tasted okay. Very peppery. Very salty. Okay. It wasn't good but it was within the bounds of ham. Fairly soft. Almost as if it could have done with more time, even though the weight was within fifty grams or so of where Ruhlman wanted it to be. I was too nervous to go beyond putting the tiniest of slivers on my tongue. 


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I've never met an animal I didn't enjoy with salt and pepper.

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