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Cooking & Curing from "Charcuterie": Part 4

Charcuterie Cookbook

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#511 tristar

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Posted 22 February 2007 - 10:58 PM

Jenny,

I use no pork at all in my sausages, so I don't really know if it would make a difference using belly or back fat. However graininess is normally caused by not binding the fats in a protein coating, rather than the type of fat. Did you mix the forcemeat sufficiently to achieve the primary bind?
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#512 cricklewood

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Posted 23 February 2007 - 12:51 AM

Thanks for the bacon appreciation, it was helpful to have this thread there to encourage me as well as the book. Jenny I cured my belly after I sealed it in a foodsaver bag and I did not have any trouble at all. You can make the bacon without pink salt but the taste won't quite be the same as well as it might not keep as long but it freezes well. I might be wrong but I am sure someone with more knowledge will chime in.

#513 Kerry Beal

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Posted 23 February 2007 - 05:08 AM

I was thinking of using my new FoodSaver to vacuum seal the pork belly in with the cure - any thoughts on that?  Or would it not allow the requisite escape of liquid?

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The foodsaver is how I cure my bacon. Just put the belly in the bag, sprinkle half the cure on each side, seal, then massage and turn it each day until it starts to feel stiff. The liquid starts to com out quite quickly.

#514 ronnie_suburban

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Posted 23 February 2007 - 07:36 AM



I was thinking of using my new FoodSaver to vacuum seal the pork belly in with the cure - any thoughts on that?  Or would it not allow the requisite escape of liquid?

View Post

The foodsaver is how I cure my bacon. Just put the belly in the bag, sprinkle half the cure on each side, seal, then massage and turn it each day until it starts to feel stiff. The liquid starts to com out quite quickly.

View Post

Yes, I do the same. My main recommendation with this method is to not remove all the air from the bag. Leave a little room (for the run-off) and seal it. You'll be golden.

=R=
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#515 FoodMan

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Posted 23 February 2007 - 08:57 AM

Gratuitous posting of pictures of homemade sausages:

Garlic-Thyme
Italian
Chipotle Mole

All sauteed with onions and vinegar and served with green apple risotto
Posted Image
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#516 ronnie_suburban

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Posted 23 February 2007 - 09:00 AM

Beautiful stuff, Elie! Are you working from recipes or strictly improvising at this point?

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#517 FoodMan

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Posted 23 February 2007 - 09:17 AM

Beautiful stuff, Elie!  Are you working from recipes or strictly improvising at this point?

=R=

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well, the Italian is from the recipe...the other two are done following the books template garlic sausage recipe but the flavor improvised.

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#518 Abra

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Posted 23 February 2007 - 09:28 AM

As beautiful as those sausages are, it's the green apple risotto I really want to know about!

#519 FoodMan

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Posted 23 February 2007 - 09:36 AM

As beautiful as those sausages are, it's the green apple risotto I really want to know about!

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Abra-
I have more info in the nappropriate thread right here about the risotto. I'd be more than happy to give you more details in that thread if you need to as well.

E. Nassar
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#520 Abra

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Posted 23 February 2007 - 05:05 PM

Hmm, I have a bit of pork loin, some red apples, carnaroli...maybe I could wing that dinner? Hints gratefully accepted!

#521 cricklewood

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Posted 24 February 2007 - 12:57 AM

I used to do an apple risotto to go with a confit pheasant dish. make a risotto as usual with chicken stock, when almost ready, heat another pan with some butter, sauté the apple chunks, till golden but still firm and then deglaze with either calvados, sherry or others and add to risotto, add cheese and butter and serve..roasted pine nuts work well also.

#522 tristar

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Posted 24 February 2007 - 03:03 AM



I was thinking of using my new FoodSaver to vacuum seal the pork belly in with the cure - any thoughts on that?  Or would it not allow the requisite escape of liquid?

View Post

The foodsaver is how I cure my bacon. Just put the belly in the bag, sprinkle half the cure on each side, seal, then massage and turn it each day until it starts to feel stiff. The liquid starts to com out quite quickly.

View Post

Yes, I do the same. My main recommendation with this method is to not remove all the air from the bag. Leave a little room (for the run-off) and seal it. You'll be golden.

=R=

View Post


I just use the freely available Ziploc type bags, they seem to be liquid and air tight, and they are re-usable after thorough cleaning and sterilising with a little diluted bleach. Have to think of the environment you know! :rolleyes:
"Don't be shy, just give it a try!"

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#523 Mallet

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Posted 24 February 2007 - 06:36 AM

I never thought of sterilizing and re-using Ziploc bags, thanks tristar!
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#524 ronnie_suburban

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Posted 24 February 2007 - 08:49 AM

I just use the freely available Ziploc type bags, they seem to be liquid and air tight, and they are re-usable after thorough cleaning and sterilising with a little diluted bleach. Have to think of the environment you know! :rolleyes:

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I find that sometimes the combination of my bumbling hands and salt/sugar granules prevents me from getting a true seal with a ziploc bag. With granules in the zipper, sometimes there is leakage. This is why I started using the foodsaver bags for curing.

=R=
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#525 jeniac42

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Posted 24 February 2007 - 10:12 AM

You can also sterilize and re-use the FoodSaver bags. Gotta think of the pocketbook, too, these days. :biggrin:

I do find cleaning and reusing bags problematic when they have had particularly greasy foods in them, as plastic seems to just absorb grease. Alas.
Jennie

#526 jeniac42

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Posted 26 February 2007 - 08:26 AM

I am thinking of doing a small amount of cured salmon, but the salmon available to me has all been previously frozen. Worth a shot? I think I'm going to try anyway, as I'm going to have an extra piece of salmon after tomorrow's lunch, so I'll post the results here. Ooh, my first project from Charcuterie....
Jennie

#527 Mallet

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Posted 26 February 2007 - 12:38 PM

I find that sometimes the combination of my bumbling hands and salt/sugar granules prevents me from getting a true seal with a ziploc bag.  With granules in the zipper, sometimes there is leakage.  This is why I started using the foodsaver bags for curing.

=R=

View Post


I had mega-issues with this yesterday, until I realized that rubbing a damp towel on the seam dissolves caked-in cure and fixes everything. I might rubbing on the spoon after putting the meat in the bag as well.
Martin Mallet
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#528 ronnie_suburban

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Posted 26 February 2007 - 12:50 PM

I am thinking of doing a small amount of cured salmon, but the salmon available to me has all been previously frozen.  Worth a shot?  I think I'm going to try anyway, as I'm going to have an extra piece of salmon after tomorrow's lunch, so I'll post the results here.  Ooh, my first project from Charcuterie....

View Post

I'm no expert but I don't think there are safety issues involved. This seems fine to me. Please let us know how it turns out.

I find that sometimes the combination of my bumbling hands and salt/sugar granules prevents me from getting a true seal with a ziploc bag.  With granules in the zipper, sometimes there is leakage.  This is why I started using the foodsaver bags for curing.

View Post


I had mega-issues with this yesterday, until I realized that rubbing a damp towel on the seam dissolves caked-in cure and fixes everything. I might rubbing on the spoon after putting the meat in the bag as well.

View Post

Thanks for the tip, Mallet. It's much appreciated.

=R=
"Hey, hey, careful man! There's a beverage here!" --The Dude, The Big Lebowski

LTHForum.com -- The definitive Chicago-based culinary chat site

ronnie_suburban 'at' yahoo.com

#529 tristar

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Posted 27 February 2007 - 12:39 AM

I am thinking of doing a small amount of cured salmon, but the salmon available to me has all been previously frozen.  Worth a shot?  I think I'm going to try anyway, as I'm going to have an extra piece of salmon after tomorrow's lunch, so I'll post the results here.  Ooh, my first project from Charcuterie....

View Post


Hi Jenny,

I can't get fresh salmon in Indonesia so all of my cured salmon has been from frozen, can't say that I have had any problems, as long as the flesh is still firm to the touch.
"Don't be shy, just give it a try!"

Nungkysman: Food for the Body and the Soul.

#530 Mallet

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Posted 04 March 2007 - 05:40 PM

I made pancetta for the first time (can't believe it took me this long to try that recipe!), what a revelation! I'm absolutely in love with the flavours, and I haven't even hung it yet. My first thought was that it would make a great sausage, any thoughts? Would it work better as a dried sausage or a grilling sausage?
Martin Mallet
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#531 jmolinari

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Posted 04 March 2007 - 06:31 PM

Grilled pancetta? you mean basically grilled cured pork belly? Hrm, might be a little fatty and tough!

#532 Mallet

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Posted 04 March 2007 - 07:02 PM

No, I meant ground pork with the pancetta seasonings/cure, stuffed into casings. I can't see it being any tougher than any other sausage.
Martin Mallet
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#533 ronnie_suburban

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Posted 04 March 2007 - 07:21 PM

No, I meant ground pork with the pancetta seasonings/cure, stuffed into casings. I can't see it being any tougher than any other sausage.

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I've done this several times, in an adaptation of Paula Wolfert's Toulouse sausage recipe from The Cooking of Southwest France (the first edition calls for salt pork but the 2nd edition actually calls for pancetta, which I'd tried, out of necessity, before I picked up the 2nd edition). I use 80% fresh pork shoulder and 20% pancetta. It makes a truly distinctive and delicious sausage, which works especially well in cassoulet. The main seasonings are garlic and black pepper with a little bit of mace or nutmeg. A bit of white wine mixed in at the end, while creating the primary bind, will take them over the top. Just be careful of the salt because when using 20% pancetta, you don't need to add nearly as much as when you are using 100% fresh pork; maybe only about a teaspoon per pound, or so.

=R=
"Hey, hey, careful man! There's a beverage here!" --The Dude, The Big Lebowski

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#534 BRM

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Posted 05 March 2007 - 09:31 AM

I find that sometimes the combination of my bumbling hands and salt/sugar granules prevents me from getting a true seal with a ziploc bag.  With granules in the zipper, sometimes there is leakage.  This is why I started using the foodsaver bags for curing.

View Post


I have this problem too from time to time. You can also fold over the top of the bag, kind of like a pastry bag, before you fill it up then unfold and seal.
Anyone who says I'm hard to shop for doesn't know where to buy beer.

#535 NYC Mike

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Posted 06 March 2007 - 09:32 AM

Hi Guys,

Need a little storage and transporting advice for a few things I made from the book.

In a few weeks I will be going camping with my oldest boy for a friday night to sunday morning deal. I wanted to bring bacon and canadian bacon for breakfasts and sweet and hot italian sausages for lunch/dinner/whenevers. In my mind there is no reason camping should = canned, cold, ashy food. :biggrin:

I've got a decent/large sized cooler but there will be no place to keep them frozen at the campsite.

Any ideas?

Thanks!

-Mike
-Mike & Andrea


#536 MarkinHouston

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Posted 06 March 2007 - 10:54 AM

Hi Guys,

Need a little storage and transporting advice for a few things I made from the book.

In a few weeks I will be going camping with my oldest boy for a friday night to sunday morning deal.  I wanted to bring bacon and canadian bacon for breakfasts and sweet and hot italian sausages for lunch/dinner/whenevers.  In my mind there is no reason camping should = canned, cold, ashy food.  :biggrin:

I've got a decent/large sized cooler but there will be no place to keep them frozen at the campsite.

Any ideas?

Thanks!

-Mike

View Post


Mike, I would start with the bacon fresh, unfrozen and ready for Saturday morning. You can have your Italian sausages frozen when you start, and they will be thawed and ready for cooking by Saturday afternoon/eveming. reeze the Canadian bacon and it will be ready for Sunday morning.

#537 qrn

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Posted 06 March 2007 - 11:34 AM

Hi Guys,

Need a little storage and transporting advice for a few things I made from the book.

In a few weeks I will be going camping with my oldest boy for a friday night to sunday morning deal.  I wanted to bring bacon and canadian bacon for breakfasts and sweet and hot italian sausages for lunch/dinner/whenevers.  In my mind there is no reason camping should = canned, cold, ashy food.  :biggrin:

I've got a decent/large sized cooler but there will be no place to keep them frozen at the campsite.

Any ideas?



Mike ,The bacons are cured and will be ok for a few days in the cooler...Poach the fresh sausages before leaving and they will also be ok for a couple days...
Bud

#538 ojisan

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Posted 06 March 2007 - 12:22 PM

No, I meant ground pork with the pancetta seasonings/cure, stuffed into casings. I can't see it being any tougher than any other sausage.

View Post

I've done this several times, in an adaptation of Paula Wolfert's Toulouse sausage recipe from The Cooking of Southwest France (the first edition calls for salt pork but the 2nd edition actually calls for pancetta, which I'd tried, out of necessity, before I picked up the 2nd edition). I use 80% fresh pork shoulder and 20% pancetta. It makes a truly distinctive and delicious sausage, which works especially well in cassoulet. The main seasonings are garlic and black pepper with a little bit of mace or nutmeg. A bit of white wine mixed in at the end, while creating the primary bind, will take them over the top. Just be careful of the salt because when using 20% pancetta, you don't need to add nearly as much as when you are using 100% fresh pork; maybe only about a teaspoon per pound, or so.

=R=

View Post


I just looked at Wolfert's 2nd ed. recipe for Toulouse Sausage - there seems to be a typo. It calls for pork tenderloin and pancetta, but the directions say grind the "tenderloin, fatback and pancetta". There is no mention of fatback in the ingredients. I assume the 1st edition has the correct recipe. How much fatback should there be?

Monterey Bay area


#539 ronnie_suburban

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Posted 06 March 2007 - 04:00 PM

I just looked at Wolfert's 2nd ed. recipe for Toulouse Sausage - there seems to be a typo. It calls for pork tenderloin and pancetta, but the directions say grind the "tenderloin, fatback and pancetta". There is no mention of fatback in the ingredients. I assume the 1st edition has the correct recipe. How much fatback should there be?

View Post

The recipe in the 1st edition calls for 4 ounces of lean salt pork (no rind), 12 ounces of pork tenderloin and 4 ounces of fatback. My take on this is to just use 4 ounces of pancetta and 1 pound of typically-fatty pork shoulder or, for a 5-pound batch, 1 pound of pancetta and 4 pounds of fatty pork shoulder. Adjust the seasonings as necessary.

=R=
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#540 ojisan

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Posted 06 March 2007 - 08:07 PM

Thanks Ron - sounds about right.

Monterey Bay area






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