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Cooking & Curing from "Charcuterie": Part 4

Charcuterie Cookbook

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#361 piperdown

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Posted 15 November 2006 - 12:03 PM

So I tried my second batch of sausages yesterday, and it all went well, up until the stuffing. There were a few problems, so I'm going to ask some really stupid questions to try and solve this.

1. I'm using a Grizzly 5lb. stuffer, and 32/35mm hog casings. I was using the mid-sized stuffer tube. Is this right? Also are there better casings to use?

2. After putting the casings on the tube, I tied off the one end, and started filling, it took a bit to get right, but occasionally air seemed to back up, and cause a balloning effect on the tube, which I think caused one of the ruptures. Is there a way to stop this? was I forcing the casing to stay on the tube too long as it was filling?

3. I got a few ruptures when twisting the sausage into links. Any tips for doing this. Also after the links are made I plan on poaching the garlic sausage, can I thne cut then into individual links, and have them hold?

So over all, it was a bit of a disaster, but as long as I learn form it, I'll be fine with it. So any tips on proper stuffing technique would be reallt great.

Oh one other thing, the instuctions on the stuffer say to sanitze the parts, would the didhwasher do this, or are there products you guys use for this?

#362 jmolinari

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Posted 15 November 2006 - 12:53 PM

don't tie the end off before they are stuffed. Just leave a little excess open casing, and tie it off after you're done. Also if they are ruputuring while twisiting them, you've stuffing them too full.

I wash my stuffer with soap and water, and then put it through the dishwasher. I thikn it should be fine. I've seen people recommend soaking the parts BEFORE use in some clorinated water.


jason

#363 FoodMan

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Posted 15 November 2006 - 01:27 PM

don't tie the end off before they are stuffed. Just leave a little excess open casing, and tie it off after you're done. Also if they are ruputuring while twisiting them, you've stuffing them too full.


Right. See what you did by tying the end off before stuffing is create a sealed "baloon" with air at the end, the more meat you stuff in the more that air pocket is getting pushed and pressure created. So like Jason said, leave a good 2 inches or so at the end without filling or tying so that the air is not trapped there, and only seal it when you are done.

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#364 Bombdog

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Posted 15 November 2006 - 03:31 PM

I keep a toothpick handy when stuffing salami. Just a poke in those pesky air pockets eliminates them.
Dave Valentin
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#365 Pallee

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Posted 15 November 2006 - 03:33 PM

I've found that if I twist the links as I stuff, one turned toward me and the next twisted away from me, that I never have a rupture. It does slow down the process a bit until you get the hang of it but worth it in the end. Also soaking the casings overnight has helped as well.

My neighbour, the duck hunter, graced me with 8 wild ducks, so yesterday was sausage day. Again I used the base recipe from the book with the roasted garlic, but also added cherries and dates. It will go in the cornbread stuffing for Thanksgiving and we wanted a bit of sweetness.

#366 Joisey

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Posted 15 November 2006 - 04:54 PM

I just started going through this thread (though I've had the book for a while now) and I have to say that the stuff you guys are producing is unbelievable. I've been mostly playing with the terrine side of the book, but I'm going to jump into the cured meat part this winter.

I notice that people are having a hard time keeping their temps down for cold smoking. I did a search and found a guy with an ingenous solution using a charcoal lighter and a garbage can, based on a technique Jacques Pepin used with an old refrigerator. The fridge idea was my moment of inspiration. With the availability of cheap fridges on Craigslist, do you think it's feasible to hook up a dryer tube from your smoker to one of those half size (or even full size) fridges and use THAT as your cold box? Do you think that the smoke residue would have a negative effect on the operation of the fridge? You could obviously keep your temperature way down. I also am toying with the idea of a large coleman cooler with a similar hose hookup, using ice packs to keep things cool. Any thoughts on these ideas?

#367 piperdown

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Posted 16 November 2006 - 10:31 AM

don't tie the end off before they are stuffed. Just leave a little excess open casing, and tie it off after you're done. Also if they are ruputuring while twisiting them, you've stuffing them too full.


jason

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Do you mean both ends? I didn't tie off the last bit, just the bit at the start. Was this wrong? I thought that if I didn't tie it offthe sausage would pour out when I started filling. I did have the wherewithall to not tie off both ends ( although I almost did) figuring that would trap in the air.

I think you're right about over stuffing though. I think I was over zealous to not get too many air pockets, not realizing that twisting off the sausage into links would probably do that job for me.

Thanks everyone for your help, I know I'd be a lot more afraid to try this stuff if I didn't have you guys here for help.

#368 jmolinari

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Posted 16 November 2006 - 11:11 AM

piper, don't tie off any ends until you are done. It won't squirt out the end if you just gently let it fill and come off the stuffing horn at the start, but it'll let the air out. Just gently hold the casing end and guide if off the horn as the meat is stuffed into it.

jason

#369 piperdown

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Posted 16 November 2006 - 10:37 PM

That makes sense, thanks jason.

Has any one made the garlic sausage before? After teh stuffing the book says to cook to 150, but in other recipes the book says to freeze or refrigerate until ready to cook. Does that mena these whould be cooked right away, and then kept? I don't think it's right to grill or roast all these sausage and then store them. Or would poaching be proper.

I did grill some up today though and served them with the staff meal, and they were mighty tasty. Also I jsut got the call that my fat back is in, so I think the next project will be the chicken and basil sausage. Damn ths suff is too fun to make, even when I'm making it a disaster, I still just want to make more.

#370 snowangel

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Posted 16 November 2006 - 10:57 PM

That makes sense, thanks jason.

Has any one made the garlic sausage before? After teh stuffing the book says to cook to 150, but in other recipes the book says to freeze or refrigerate until ready to cook. Does that mena these whould be cooked right away, and then kept? I don't think it's right to grill or roast all these sausage and then store them. Or would poaching be proper.

I did grill some up today though and served them with the staff meal, and they were mighty tasty. Also I jsut got the call that my fat back is in, so I think the next project will be the chicken and basil sausage. Damn ths suff is too fun to make, even when I'm making it a disaster, I still just want to make more.

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When I made these, I smoked some of them (to please my husband) and froze the rest of them, uncooked, and we grilled them.
Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"

#371 Abra

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Posted 18 November 2006 - 06:10 PM

Michael, I have a question. Today I started some maple-cured bacon with half a pork belly, and having already stolen the rind from the other half to make daube, I needed to use half a skinless belly. I made Jim Drohman's pork belly confit, and as I was pouring a bottle of wine over the meat I got to thinking about the cooked wine thing again.

I'm pretty convinced that it's a good thing to cook wine before using it in marinade, but this recipe didn't call for that. Is it that the salt will get the wine into the meat, even though the acids might "cook" the surface? Or is it that the belly is at least half fat, which is not likely to be "cooked" by the wine? Or something else? The mouse of doubt is gnawing at me over this one!

If anyone besides Michael wants to weigh in on this one, of course, have at it!

#372 Bombdog

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Posted 20 November 2006 - 12:47 PM

Well, after what seems like a long time, I FINALLY think I got the coppa right.

Posted Image

Hot in the foreground, and sweet in the back. Both recipes from the book.


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After removing the collagen casings, sweet on the left, hot on the right.
Dave Valentin
Retired Explosive Detection K9 Handler
"So, what if we've got it all backwards?" asks my son.
"Got what backwards?" I ask.
"What if chicken tastes like rattlesnake?" My son, the Einstein of the family.


#373 dls

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Posted 20 November 2006 - 12:57 PM

Well, after what seems like a long time, I FINALLY think I got the coppa right.

Posted Image

Hot in the foreground, and sweet in the back.  Both recipes from the book.


Posted Image

After removing the collagen casings, sweet on the left, hot on the right.

View Post


Looks beautiful. How's the taste?

#374 Bombdog

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Posted 20 November 2006 - 01:14 PM

Looks beautiful. How's the taste?

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Great flavor, reminiscent of the lomo I did a few months ago. I'm quite satisfied with it.
Dave Valentin
Retired Explosive Detection K9 Handler
"So, what if we've got it all backwards?" asks my son.
"Got what backwards?" I ask.
"What if chicken tastes like rattlesnake?" My son, the Einstein of the family.


#375 dls

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Posted 20 November 2006 - 01:21 PM


Looks beautiful. How's the taste?

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Great flavor, reminiscent of the lomo I did a few months ago. I'm quite satisfied with it.

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Glad to hear it. I've not yet done the coppa. You've inspired me to give it a go. Did you follow the recipe from the book verbatim, or did you make any alterations?

#376 Bombdog

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Posted 20 November 2006 - 01:49 PM

Glad to hear it. I've not yet done the coppa. You've inspired me to give it a go. Did you follow the recipe from the book verbatim, or did you make any alterations?

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I used the method of removing the whole coppa from the shoulder that Jason posted WAY upthread, and then followed the recipes pretty much as written.
Dave Valentin
Retired Explosive Detection K9 Handler
"So, what if we've got it all backwards?" asks my son.
"Got what backwards?" I ask.
"What if chicken tastes like rattlesnake?" My son, the Einstein of the family.


#377 Abra

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Posted 20 November 2006 - 02:01 PM

Beautiful! And the fat is still so snowy white - great contrast.

#378 Bombdog

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Posted 20 November 2006 - 02:04 PM

Beautiful!  And the fat is still so snowy white - great contrast.

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Thank you Abra!
Dave Valentin
Retired Explosive Detection K9 Handler
"So, what if we've got it all backwards?" asks my son.
"Got what backwards?" I ask.
"What if chicken tastes like rattlesnake?" My son, the Einstein of the family.


#379 lennyk

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Posted 21 November 2006 - 06:32 PM

first attempt at bacon
dried it with a fan
Posted Image
in the weber smokey mountain cooker
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sliced
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MMMmmmmmmmm
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#380 Bombdog

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Posted 21 November 2006 - 06:37 PM

first attempt at bacon
dried it with a fan

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Lenny, that is some great looking LEAN bacon....
Dave Valentin
Retired Explosive Detection K9 Handler
"So, what if we've got it all backwards?" asks my son.
"Got what backwards?" I ask.
"What if chicken tastes like rattlesnake?" My son, the Einstein of the family.


#381 lennyk

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Posted 21 November 2006 - 06:43 PM

yeah, finding quality thick belly is hit and miss here

Lenny, that is some great looking LEAN bacon....



#382 Rubashov

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Posted 21 November 2006 - 10:47 PM

Hi everyone,
I just successfully completed my first emulsified sausage, and boy, do I feel cool! It's a recipe not in the book - a Swedish sausage named "jalkorv" - but I followed the book's procedure and even modified the recipe a little bit to conform to book's guidelines. In short, it turned out great. We're spending Thanksgiving with a family of Swedish descent, and this was a special request when they heard I make sausage. It's fun to be in demand!

My only question is regarding consistency. I used the mixer method (as opposed to the food processor method), and yet the sausages still seem more fluffy and airy than I'd like. Has anyone else run into this issue? If so, how does one get around it?

On a different note, I'm curious how others will be incorporating charcuterie into their Thanksgiving meals. Last year I did an appetizer for a holiday party that I called "Thanksgiving in one bite." It was a round of Italian toast (to simulate the stuffing), topped by a turkey-cranberry sausage, with some mashed potatoes piped on top. Delicious!

Take care, and happy Thanksgiving, everyone.

-Rob

#383 Joisey

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Posted 22 November 2006 - 01:00 PM

--On a different note, I'm curious how others will be incorporating charcuterie into their Thanksgiving meals.--

Boning & Tying Cornish Game Hens, stuffing with a Pheasant-Apricot sausage.

#384 ronnie_suburban

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Posted 22 November 2006 - 01:15 PM

On a different note, I'm curious how others will be incorporating charcuterie into their Thanksgiving meals.

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For the first time, the sausage in my Thanksgiving stuffing will be homemade. I have to say that for an improv job, the sausage turned out pretty well. Here's the recipe, in case anyone's interested:

5# fatty pork butt
3 T Kosher salt
4 T high-quality dried sage
2 T Maple sugar
1 T freshly-minced garlic
1.5 T red pepper flakes
4 t freshly-ground black pepper
1 C ice water

Happy Thanksgiving!! :smile:

=R=
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#385 qrn

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Posted 25 November 2006 - 11:19 AM

Hi All,,
I just finished up a batch of dried Spanish chorizo, tuscan, and sopressa venta da friuili, in hog casings. Served them as appitizers for thanksgiving dinner...They were really good...
They have lost about 35% of moisture.
Now the question...If I wrap them in paper and refrigerate, will they dry much more in the frige??? I am leery that they will turn into really,dry hard sticks..

Since commericial sausages are vac packed in bags, would that be a viable way to extend their life??? Any direction would be appreciated....

Bud

#386 jmolinari

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Posted 25 November 2006 - 11:47 AM

if you put them in a zip lock bag they'll keep their moisture quite well.

#387 Bombdog

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Posted 25 November 2006 - 01:08 PM

I've kept them in zip locks in the crisper with no ill effects. Since purchasing a foodsaver I vacuum seal them, also with no ill effects. In all honesty, nothing lasts so long that it would go bad, especially this time of year.
Dave Valentin
Retired Explosive Detection K9 Handler
"So, what if we've got it all backwards?" asks my son.
"Got what backwards?" I ask.
"What if chicken tastes like rattlesnake?" My son, the Einstein of the family.


#388 qrn

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Posted 25 November 2006 - 07:12 PM

Ok , that is what I was wondering...I was having visions of all sorts of things growing in them if I packed them in vac pac or ziplocks...Thanks for the great advice...
I found some jowls last week, and the place has all kinds of hog parts....When I was picking up the jowls I asked about back fat. "sure, look in that case" and I got about 6 pounds for a couple bucks...Gonna get a picnic and do a prosciutto.

While at a middle east market the other day, there was a whole lamb cut up in chunks on the counter, so I am gonna try Jasons lamb prosciutto..along with some merquez...
So much to do and so little time!
Bud

#389 FoodMan

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Posted 27 November 2006 - 10:16 AM

I am planning on making Cassoulet de Toulouse sometime soon from Paula Wolfert's book and of course I wanted some good homemade sausage in it. So, last night I used the Garlic Sausage recipe and altered it by adding some fresh thyme, grated nutmeg and white wine instead of red. Using white wine was based on Paula Wolfert's recipe for Toulouse sausages.

I ended up with about 5.5 lbs of lovely fresh sausage
Posted Image


I had about four patties worth that I did not stuff and I fried them up for breakfast this morning with eggs. Deliciouse! This is going to be one memorable Cassoulet. I will report back when I do make it. Now the stuffed sausages are in the freezer tightly packed.

E. Nassar
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#390 Abra

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Posted 27 November 2006 - 02:19 PM

Elie, howzabout you bring that sausage over here to go with the duck confit and pork belly confit I have curing for cassoulet, and we will so be in business!





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