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Cooking & Curing from "Charcuterie": Part 3

Charcuterie Cookbook

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596 replies to this topic

#91 Richard Kilgore

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Posted 04 June 2006 - 10:43 PM

pedrissimo, I don't recall the word for belly. My Spanish is weak and their English is limited but we manage to communicate well enough to get a belly out the door. Point and gesture when needed. I would have no problem with getting it from the Vietnamese market I shop at regularly either. Just let your eyes and nose be your guide just like they would anywhere. There are plenty of good asian and hispanic markets in most Texas cities.

That's a beautiful peperone, Ron. Congratulations!

#92 mdbasile

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Posted 05 June 2006 - 12:58 AM

Ron WOW! Those are most beautiful!

Congratulations!

#93 mdbasile

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Posted 05 June 2006 - 01:06 AM

White mold question

I have collected my Chirizo and Tuscan Salami - will post once I charge my camera battery...

I have question about the white mold. I have some pretty heavy white mold on the Tuscan - do I wash it or brush it off?

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Bump...

Looks like the Tuscan will need a couple more days, and the chirizo also. Still wondering about the mold.

#94 mdbasile

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Posted 05 June 2006 - 01:08 AM

Well, last weekend i finally put up in cure 2 more coppe, and took the opportunity to take pictures of the butchery. I figured people would be interested in how to "harvest" the coppa from the shoulder.

This is a boneless shoulder from costco. You can see the bone was removed on the left of the picture. The coppa is circled in blue on the right. Notice the characteristic fat striations. This is the part that is at the top of the shoulder, right above/behind the head on the back.

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This picture has the shoulder flipped over, and the coppa is in my hand. It is just the backside of hte piece in the above picture in my left hand.

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This is the coppa removed. How you remove it and how much meat you leave around it and shape it is not super critical..it is pretty hard to see exactly where it begins and where it ends.
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This is the coppa again, just showing the fat striations. They are very evident and quite large in the middle of hte coppa.
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Another picture of the coppa
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If you can make bresaola, you can make coppa, it is MUCH easier than salame, as there is no acidification needed. Just salt cure, then put in casing, then hang.

good luck!

jason

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Nice pictoral....thanks

#95 Michael Ruhlman

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Posted 05 June 2006 - 06:12 AM

White mold question

I have collected my Chirizo and Tuscan Salami - will post once I charge my camera battery...

I have question about the white mold. I have some pretty heavy white mold on the Tuscan - do I wash it or brush it off?

View Post


hard to say withoug seeing it but unless it's furry, it should be fine. I would leave it on while it's drying--good mold competes with bad mold so the more good you have the better--and then brush it off when it's finished.

the only reason you would want mold at all, as far as i'm concerned, is because it prevents bad mold from growing.

#96 Michael Ruhlman

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Posted 05 June 2006 - 06:15 AM

Pork Belly question:

In my search for great pork belly here mentioned up thread, I talked to Central Market about geting a Berkshire pork belly. Today I looked at the bershire site and they list only a pork belly with skin off. Michael and Brian call for a skin-on pork belly. So should I avoid the Berkshire and have a grocery store source a commercial skin-on belly, or look for a local farm-raised skin-on belly?

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The skin does help retain moisture, it also helps retain the shape. and skin of course is loaded with collagen and so skin is fantastic to add to stocks and stews for great body. and it's sublime when cooked till crispy. but you don't need skin. I would go for the best quality pork.

#97 jmolinari

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Posted 05 June 2006 - 06:31 AM

Michael, i've read that good mold acutally consumes some of the lactic acid in the paste, making it a little less tangy, whcih is why it is desireable.

Is this just an "old wives tale" ?

j

#98 Mallet

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Posted 05 June 2006 - 06:59 AM

I'm not Michael but I would think that since mold is not supposed to penetrate the casing then it couldn't consume anything in it.
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#99 Abra

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Posted 05 June 2006 - 07:00 AM

I just want to post a teaser image from our Charcuterie Play Day. Twelve of us made sausage and smoked bacon and pastrami all day long, and ate and drank enough to sustain ourselves through our mighty efforts. There were five Kitchen Aids in attendance with their owners, although I think our vertical stuffer did all the stuffing, while the KAs were relegated to what they do best: grinding and binding.

This is actually an evening-after shot
Posted Image
Duck Sausage with Roasted Garlic and Sage on the far left, nestled in next to Chicken Sausage with Green Chile. And their friends, grilled poblano pepper, grilled plaintain, Rum-Soaked Baked Beans, and salad with walnut mayonnaise dressing.

By the way, the slo-mo sight of a folding table collapsing and four KAs crashing slowly to the floor is one you never want to see, take it from me!

#100 ronnie_suburban

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Posted 05 June 2006 - 07:42 AM

Damn, Abra! That looks (and sounds) great and I cannot wait for the full report. :smile:

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#101 davecap

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Posted 05 June 2006 - 09:05 AM

Damn, Abra!  That looks (and sounds) great and I cannot wait for the full report. :smile:

=R=

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I am working on some pancetta and it is hanging in my garage with a black bag around it to keep the light out. After two weeks of walking right by it, my wife finally said "what is that?" and I told her it was my pancetta, like, what, you never see pancetta hanging in here before?! She just gave the roll the eyes and said she must have the only husband making his own pancetta in the county. It really is kinda funny when you think about it! But when I slice that baby up, she will be more than happy to have some.

#102 snowangel

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Posted 05 June 2006 - 11:01 AM

Question time. I'm ready to rig up a curing chamber (ala Chris). I have a nice place in the basement that will remain cool and dark all summer. But, we have a cabin up north and I periodically get away with the kids, and I'm thinking I need to time dry curing so it coincides with a time I will be home for the number of days it needs, right? Or can this stuff sit unattended and unloved for 3-4 days?
Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"

#103 ronnie_suburban

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Posted 05 June 2006 - 11:38 AM

Question time.  I'm ready to rig up a curing chamber (ala Chris).  I have a nice place in the basement that will remain cool and dark all summer.  But, we have a cabin up north and I periodically get away with the kids, and I'm thinking I need to time dry curing so it coincides with a time I will be home for the number of days it needs, right?  Or can this stuff sit unattended and unloved for 3-4 days?

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I think this really depends on the humidity in your curing area and whether or not you need to run a humidifier to maintain the proper level. If no humidity maintenance is needed, you'd probably be ok leaving it unattended for a few days. I doubt that in a MN basement, you'd have significant temperature fluctuations over the course of just a few days.

I'd be curious to hear what others think about this, as well.

=R=
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#104 Bombdog

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Posted 05 June 2006 - 11:51 AM

I don't think I'd be too worried about it, unless you are right on the brink of pulling something out. I can't imagine you are going to have something in there for less than a couple weeks normally. Hell, my proscuitto went in in March and won't be anywhere near ready before September at the earliest. Okay, I do admit that is a bit of an extreme example. Even if you were to leave something in 3/4 days past the 30 percent time I still don't think you are going to suffer. It's all pretty subjective anyway.
Dave Valentin
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"Got what backwards?" I ask.
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#105 Chris Amirault

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Posted 05 June 2006 - 11:54 AM

Based on what you've written, I think you'll be fine to let 'em sit for 3-4 days. Only one way to find out....
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#106 snowangel

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Posted 05 June 2006 - 12:07 PM

Given what you all have said, I think I'll give it a whirl. Although I can get bactoferm locally, it's an awful, 1 hour trip each way, so I'm going to order some. If I want to do pepperone, what size casings do I want from butcher packer? And, it doesn't seem like there's a lot of fat in the recipe in the book. What cut of beef did you all use? For the Tuscan salame, what size casings? (My credit card is sitting here just waiting to be used!).
Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"

#107 Chris Amirault

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Posted 05 June 2006 - 12:13 PM

If I want to do pepperone, what size casings do I want from butcher packer? 

I used standard hog casings and they were fine. Traditional is thinner (sheep I think?).

And, it doesn't seem like there's a lot of fat in the recipe in the book.  What cut of beef did you all use?


I used a chuck roast and kept in the tiny bits of fat on it.
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#108 Bombdog

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Posted 05 June 2006 - 12:39 PM

If I want to do pepperone, what size casings do I want from butcher packer? 

I used standard hog casings and they were fine. Traditional is thinner (sheep I think?).

And, it doesn't seem like there's a lot of fat in the recipe in the book.  What cut of beef did you all use?


I used a chuck roast and kept in the tiny bits of fat on it.

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Ditto
Dave Valentin
Retired Explosive Detection K9 Handler
"So, what if we've got it all backwards?" asks my son.
"Got what backwards?" I ask.
"What if chicken tastes like rattlesnake?" My son, the Einstein of the family.


#109 ronnie_suburban

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Posted 05 June 2006 - 01:35 PM

Given what you all have said, I think I'll give it a whirl.  Although I can get bactoferm locally, it's an awful, 1 hour trip each way, so I'm going to order some.  If I want to do pepperone, what size casings do I want from butcher packer?  And, it doesn't seem like there's a lot of fat in the recipe in the book.  What cut of beef did you all use?  For the Tuscan salame, what size casings?  (My credit card is sitting here just waiting to be used!).

View Post

For the peperone, I used pork butt :shock:

=R=
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#110 snowangel

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Posted 05 June 2006 - 01:44 PM

How much bactoferm should I order? (and thanks for holding my hand)
Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"

#111 Bombdog

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Posted 05 June 2006 - 02:20 PM

Well....my first time out I ordered one pkg (25g) from Butcher-Packer. I ended up going through that pretty fast. So on my next order I got two pkgs. Everyone here has said that it keeps fine, and I pretty much think that I'll use it up before it goes bad.
Dave Valentin
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"So, what if we've got it all backwards?" asks my son.
"Got what backwards?" I ask.
"What if chicken tastes like rattlesnake?" My son, the Einstein of the family.


#112 mdbasile

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Posted 05 June 2006 - 05:59 PM

I just want to post a teaser image from our Charcuterie Play Day.  Twelve of us made sausage and smoked bacon and pastrami all day long, and ate and drank enough to sustain ourselves through our mighty efforts.  There were five Kitchen Aids in attendance with their owners, although I think our vertical stuffer did all the stuffing, while the KAs were relegated to what they do best: grinding and binding.

This is actually an evening-after shot
Posted Image
Duck Sausage with Roasted Garlic and Sage on the far left, nestled in next to Chicken Sausage with Green Chile.  And their friends, grilled poblano pepper, grilled plaintain, Rum-Soaked Baked Beans, and salad with walnut mayonnaise dressing.

By the way, the slo-mo sight of a folding table collapsing and four KAs crashing slowly to the floor is one you never want to see, take it from me!

View Post


I prefer the sight of those sausages!!! Yum

#113 jmolinari

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Posted 05 June 2006 - 05:59 PM

I'm not sure how you guys are going through the bactoferm so fast. Each package makes 200lbs of meat!! You only need to add a 1/4 tsp or so to 5 lbs of salame.

#114 Chris Amirault

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Posted 05 June 2006 - 06:02 PM

It's the proportions in the book, Jason. They suggest far higher quantities than the packaging.
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#115 mdbasile

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Posted 05 June 2006 - 06:04 PM

Here is my Chorizo and Tuscan left to right in all the photos.

Yummy - some of the Chorizo needs some more time. Flavor is excellent and texture seems perfect. I am very happy. I didn't even brush off the mold... I was eating some bucheron with a nice baguet and the salami's and they all had white mold on the outside!!

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Posted Image

Edited by mdbasile, 05 June 2006 - 06:10 PM.


#116 ronnie_suburban

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Posted 05 June 2006 - 06:09 PM

I'm not sure how you guys are going through the bactoferm so fast. Each package makes 200lbs of meat!! You only need to add a 1/4 tsp or so to 5 lbs of salame.

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It's the proportions in the book, Jason. They suggest far higher quantities than the packaging.

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Yeah, now that you mention it, I scaled it back a bit too, based on the instructions on the Bactoferm packet. For my peperone, I ended up using about twice the amount called for on the packet, which was still substantially less than called for in the book.

=R=
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ronnie_suburban 'at' yahoo.com

#117 ronnie_suburban

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Posted 05 June 2006 - 06:10 PM

Nice job, mdbasile. I definitely have mold envy too.

What was the overall cure time on those?

=R=
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#118 Bombdog

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Posted 05 June 2006 - 06:29 PM

Mark
That stuff looks great! Congrats!

Jason, I have since reduced my bactoferm amounts somewhat after a waaaay earlier discussion here on the subject. Still, I found myself going though the stuff pretty fast at first.

I've since become overloaded in cured salame and am not making it as fast as I did a few months ago.
Dave Valentin
Retired Explosive Detection K9 Handler
"So, what if we've got it all backwards?" asks my son.
"Got what backwards?" I ask.
"What if chicken tastes like rattlesnake?" My son, the Einstein of the family.


#119 Ore

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Posted 05 June 2006 - 06:35 PM

I have to say...all the meats on this topice look great. Glad to see there is such a huge interest!

#120 snowangel

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Posted 05 June 2006 - 07:30 PM

Given what you all have said, I think I'll give it a whirl.  Although I can get bactoferm locally, it's an awful, 1 hour trip each way, so I'm going to order some.  If I want to do pepperone, what size casings do I want from butcher packer?  And, it doesn't seem like there's a lot of fat in the recipe in the book.  What cut of beef did you all use?  For the Tuscan salame, what size casings?  (My credit card is sitting here just waiting to be used!).

View Post

For the peperone, I used pork butt :shock:

=R=

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Has anyone does a side by side comparison of butt ( :wub: :wub: :wub: ) with beef?
Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"





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