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Cooking & Curing from "Charcuterie": Part 3

Charcuterie Cookbook

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596 replies to this topic

#481 qrn

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Posted 12 July 2006 - 03:51 PM

Hello Folks, My first post to this thread....
I have been looking at it for a few weeks, and it got me to dig out my sausage stuff. I got the Rhulman book and read it along with the others I already had...I have not made any sausage for about ten years, and this was a good thing to get me going again..
There was one thing that I thought might add to the thread so Here goes..
I am using an old old grinder , an Enterprise #22 that has to be from the 1930's and belonged to my grandfather..
The stuffer is one that I made 10 year ago or so, and it is interesting. It holds about 5 lb of meat and the total cost was probably less than $10.
Its a 4" i.d. , 1/4" wall plexiglass (cast acrylic) tube, with the mechanicals from an english caulking gun. The white plunger plates are 1/2" HDPE cutting board.
The front end has a PE threaded nipple on it to attach the feed tube to.
It lays on the counter and with one hand you squeeze the trigger on the thing and regulate the feed with the other...I have been routinely doing very small (1#)batches with it. The only waste is the little bit inside of the feed tube...
Getting ready to do a dried saussion sec to test out my drying area...I have a photo darkroom in the basement that stays 65º or less year round at 55-60% RH. Wish me luck, and will report back...(hope I got the Pics downloaded OK)
Bud

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#482 ronnie_suburban

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Posted 12 July 2006 - 08:50 PM

Nice, old-skool equipment, qrn. I look forward to reading about your projects. And . . . good luck (although, with this book, you won't need too much luck). :smile:

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#483 Michael Ruhlman

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Posted 13 July 2006 - 11:29 AM

The stuffer is one that I made 10 year ago or so, and it is interesting. It holds about 5 lb of meat and the total cost was probably less than $10.
Its a 4" i.d. , 1/4" wall plexiglass (cast acrylic) tube, with the mechanicals from an english caulking gun. The white plunger plates are 1/2" HDPE cutting board.
The front end has a PE threaded nipple on it to attach the feed tube to.
It lays on the counter and with one hand you squeeze the trigger on the thing and regulate the feed with the other...I have been routinely doing very small (1#)batches with it. The only waste is the little bit inside of the feed tube...
Getting ready to do a dried saussion sec to test out my drying area...I have a photo darkroom in the basement that stays 65º or less year round at 55-60% RH. Wish me luck, and will report back...(hope I got the Pics downloaded OK)
Bud


ingenious stuffer, you should market it. though i bet you have a Popeye forearm by the time you've pumped five pounds out.

and make sure you throw that grinder into the freezer the night before you grind.

good luck!

#484 qrn

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Posted 13 July 2006 - 11:50 AM

[

ingenious stuffer, you should market it.  though i bet you have a Popeye forearm by the time you've pumped five pounds out.




No it really quite easy, the mechanisim has a lot of mechanical advantage, Its made for really big tubes of caulking,and yes the grinder takes a lot of time to change temp..
Thanks for the comment, great book!

Bud

#485 Dave Weinstein

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Posted 14 July 2006 - 03:14 PM

So, I'm going to make some Pate this weekend. I'm planning on making it in 12oz ramekins, and I was thinking of lining it with caul fat. Does anyone know if this will give enough hold that I can pop the finished pates out of the ramekins intact?

#486 Abra

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Posted 14 July 2006 - 03:49 PM

The pate I just did was lined with caul fat. Granted, I did it in a terrine pan, but the caul really did hold it together. The only reservation I'd have about using caul in a ramekin is that it's mostly fat, and that fat renders, and your pate will be sitting in a fat puddle. Upside - it should come out easily. Downside - might need a bit of patting down so as not to be too greasy after it comes out.

#487 tristar

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Posted 15 July 2006 - 09:31 PM

My take on Pancetta from 'Charcuterie' using a loin and breast of lamb, substituted Rosemary and rainbow peppercorns in the recipe. What else to call it but Lambcetta! :rolleyes:

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I will let you know how it turns out after drying!

Regards,
Richard

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Well here is the finished product, slightly herby, sweet and peppery, fats are smooth and the meat is very tender, not a disapointment in any way!

Thanks again for the inspiration Michael.

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Best Regards from a steamy Jakarta,
Richard
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#488 Abra

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Posted 16 July 2006 - 07:22 AM

Beautiful, Richard! It's amazing how the fat stayed so white, instead of turning ivory, which is more what I get.

#489 Dave Weinstein

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Posted 16 July 2006 - 08:37 AM

The pate I just did was lined with caul fat.  Granted, I did it in a terrine pan, but the caul really  did hold it together.  The only reservation I'd have about using caul in a ramekin is that it's mostly fat, and that fat renders, and your pate will be sitting in a fat puddle.  Upside - it should come out easily.  Downside - might need a bit of patting down so as not to be too greasy after it comes out.

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Should I pat it down before or after the cool-down in the fridge?

#490 ronnie_suburban

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Posted 16 July 2006 - 08:45 AM

The pate I just did was lined with caul fat.  Granted, I did it in a terrine pan, but the caul really  did hold it together.  The only reservation I'd have about using caul in a ramekin is that it's mostly fat, and that fat renders, and your pate will be sitting in a fat puddle.  Upside - it should come out easily.  Downside - might need a bit of patting down so as not to be too greasy after it comes out.

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Should I pat it down before or after the cool-down in the fridge?

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Before. Try to find an object that fits exactly into opening of the cooking vessel and weigh it down with a (wrapped) brick or unopened #10 can.

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#491 ronnie_suburban

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Posted 16 July 2006 - 08:46 AM

Beautiful pics, Richard. That pancetta look gorgeous.

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#492 Dave Weinstein

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Posted 16 July 2006 - 09:26 AM


Should I pat it down before or after the cool-down in the fridge?

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Before. Try to find an object that fits exactly into opening of the cooking vessel and weigh it down with a (wrapped) brick or unopened #10 can.

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I was planning on a disk of tin foil and pie weights. I guess the question is, should I try to somehow remove the rendered fat before weighting it and cooling it?

#493 Irishgirl

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Posted 16 July 2006 - 10:19 AM


Should I pat it down before or after the cool-down in the fridge?

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Before. Try to find an object that fits exactly into opening of the cooking vessel and weigh it down with a (wrapped) brick or unopened #10 can.

View Post


I was planning on a disk of tin foil and pie weights. I guess the question is, should I try to somehow remove the rendered fat before weighting it and cooling it?

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When I have done large terrines/pates, I weight it upside down and let the weight of the terrine mold create the pressure against the block or object with which I am "weighting" it against. What happens is the rendered fat drains during the weighting process. It makes for a "cleaner" product.
So in answer, I would advise to drain the rendered fat, but I doubt if you can use my method as you are doing individual ramekins and the weight would be negligeable (sp?). Although, if you really want to try it, my advice would be to use a small can (Tomato paste or sauce?), put a piece of saran wrapped cardboard between it and the terrine(s) and then invert each one onto a sheet pan and cover a few at a time with a pizza stone or some such thing (cutting board with additional cans on top?). I wouldn't advise a brick as they are so small. You refrigerate them inverted overnight. If you are adverse to getting rendered fat on your cans, then just saran wrap them too.

Good luck! :smile:

#494 hwilson41

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Posted 16 July 2006 - 10:38 AM

Thanks, Doc-G and Michael, I appreciate it.  As with most things, this one follows the saying that "necessity is the mother of invention."  In my case, it's a necessity to find new and interesting things to do with bluefish.  By late August, they will almost literally be jumping into the boat, and while we throw back most of what we catch (50+ fish days aren't uncommon), you still end up with a lot of fillets.

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Rubashov, if you have acess to a smoker, bluefish cold smoked over Pecan is absolutely delicious. I used to own a hardwood lumber yard, and one day a customer came in and bought a lot of the low-grade Pecan that I couldn't sell to the cabinetmaking trade (at a steep discount, of course :raz:). At first, I didn't know what he was doing with it, but on his second or third trip, he brought me some smoked blues. Sacre bleu! They were just outstanding. Thereafter, I made him an even better deal on the low grade lumber, just so he'd keep bringing me the smoked blues after they were done :biggrin:.
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#495 Rubashov

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Posted 16 July 2006 - 12:24 PM

Rubashov, if you have acess to a smoker, bluefish cold smoked over Pecan is absolutely delicious.  I used to own a hardwood lumber yard, and one day a customer came in and bought a lot of the low-grade Pecan that I couldn't sell to the cabinetmaking trade (at a steep discount, of course :raz:).  At first, I didn't know what he was doing with it, but on his second or third trip, he brought me some smoked blues.  Sacre bleu!  They were just outstanding.  Thereafter, I made him an even better deal on the low grade lumber, just so he'd keep bringing me the smoked blues after they were done :biggrin:.

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Cool, that sounds great. I'll have to get my hands on some pecan around here in that case. I usually use hickory when I'm smoking beef, pork, ribs, etc., but I think that would be too harsh for the fish.

-Rob

#496 Rubashov

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Posted 16 July 2006 - 12:32 PM

In other news, I just hung my bone-in lamb prosciutto and a coppa (solid muscle, no casing) to dry. I'm taking off tomorrow to get married next weekend. By the time I return from the honeymoon in about 3 weeks, I'm hoping there will be some tasty progress on the charcuterie front.

Since it appeared that my bresaola dried a bit quicker on the outside than I would have liked (thus leaving the slight ring on it), I rubbed both pieces liberally with lard before I hung them. Definitely a job for latex gloves! It wasn't pretty, but it got much easier (albeit messier) once the lard warmed up a bit. Then I wrapped them in cheesecloth and hung them up in my curing chamber, which is a mini-fridge.

Of course, the out-of-town approach may be risky, as I won't be here to check the humidity levels and see whether there's any funky green stuff growing anywhere. However, to try to hedge my bets, I wiped down the whole interior of the fridge with a bleach solution just to kill anything that was thinking of messing with my stuff!

I'll report on the results when I get home, hopefully with some good news!

Best,
Rob

#497 Mallet

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Posted 16 July 2006 - 06:57 PM

In other news, I just hung my bone-in lamb prosciutto and a coppa (solid muscle, no casing) to dry.  I'm taking off tomorrow to get married next weekend.  By the time I return from the honeymoon in about 3 weeks, I'm hoping there will be some tasty progress on the charcuterie front.

Since it appeared that my bresaola dried a bit quicker on the outside than I would have liked (thus leaving the slight ring on it), I rubbed both pieces liberally with lard before I hung them.  Definitely a job for latex gloves!  It wasn't pretty, but it got much easier (albeit messier) once the lard warmed up a bit.  Then I wrapped them in cheesecloth and hung them up in my curing chamber, which is a mini-fridge.

Of course, the out-of-town approach may be risky, as I won't be here to check the humidity levels and see whether there's any funky green stuff growing anywhere.  However, to try to hedge my bets, I wiped down the whole interior of the fridge with a bleach solution just to kill anything that was thinking of messing with my stuff!

I'll report on the results when I get home, hopefully with some good news!

Best,
Rob

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I dunno, sounds a bit risky... Maybe you should come back from your honeymoon sooner ? :laugh:


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#498 Dave Weinstein

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Posted 17 July 2006 - 08:23 AM

Fortuitous Find of the Weekend: 28oz tomato cans are the perfect size to sit on top of pates in 12oz Ramekins.

I haven't cut into the individual pates yet, but I have sampled the leftover bit that I poached (and I brought that for lunch today).

Recipe: Pate de Campagne from the book, with duck eggs instead of hens eggs.

Notes so far: Reduce the parsley for the next batch. That's about it.

#499 Abra

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Posted 17 July 2006 - 09:17 AM

Dave, the pate will continue to improve with time. I left mine for a week before cutting it, and it was delicious. Two weeks later, when we ate the last scrap, it was 95% as delicious as after a 1 week cure. Let it rest, if you can.

#500 Dave Weinstein

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Posted 17 July 2006 - 09:35 AM

Dave, the pate will continue to improve with time.  I left mine for a week before cutting it, and it was delicious.  Two weeks later, when we ate the last scrap, it was 95% as delicious as after a 1 week cure.  Let it rest, if you can.

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Sounds like grounds for experimentation. One to open up in the next day or so, one when that is done, and I think the other two will go shrink wrapped into the deep freeze for future use.

#501 tristar

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Posted 20 July 2006 - 10:48 PM

Richard, tell us more about brisket bacon.  Now there's a concept!

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Hi All,

Maybe for the purists here, I should just call it smoke cured brisket! I know how some people get upset when they feel the word bacon is being stolen from the pig! :biggrin:

I have not eaten any pork for ten years , but I used to, and there is still something about the smell of a piece of bacon frying in the pan in the morning which gets my salivary glands working overtime! :smile:

Not eating pork I had to find something to replace it with, I had in the past purchased commercial beef bacon, but here in Indonesia it is incredibly expensive, when it is available! So after reading on sausagemaking.org about some of the forum members making their own bacon, I decided to have a go myself with beef. I realise that the commercial versions use beef plate, but that seems to be impossible to obtain here so I looked for the closest layering of beef and fat which was similar to pork belly. Brisket! I bought a commercial dry cure with smoke powder and rubbed up some brisket and stored in the fridge. 7 days later delicious Brisket Bacon! This is different from the American style bacon as it is not hot smoked and partially cooked, this is more akin to British Bacon which is only cold smoked!

It is a little tougher than real bacon, but the taste and more especially the cooking aroma is mouthwatering! and it still makes a good sandwich!

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Regards,
Richard

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Last week just before returning to Africa, I took the remains of my Brisket Bacon which by this time had been sitting uncovered in the fridge for 4 weeks, sliced it and packed it to take away with me. The 4 weeks drying had darkened the meat as would be expected but it had also firmed it up such that it was very easy to slice thinly. I sampled a couple of rashers and it seemed to have improved with age, being seemingly more tender, of course this could just be an effect of the thinner rasher. This morning I decide to open the presliced rashers and found to my suprise that on the end of the rasher was some "Bloom", white and dry, not furry or colourful I hasten to add. The rashers were cooked and were just as delicious as before.

My question is, "What exactly is the Bloom?" I am assuming it is a type of fungal growth, but am not sure. I certainly isn't salty to the taste at all!

Regards,
Richard
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#502 jbehmoaras

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Posted 21 July 2006 - 04:28 AM

I was thinking about making the dry cured duck breast but then I wondered why not use the recipe that includes maple syrup but instead use hoisin or plum sauce ... Any reason why this may not work?
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#503 Chris Amirault

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Posted 23 July 2006 - 10:31 AM

One way to find out! Try it and let us know.

Speaking of tweaking the recipes toward Asia, I found a cheap Niman Ranch tenderloin at Whole Foods and decided to make a pork rub using the sugar/salt/seasoning proportions in the book but with 2T black pepper, 2T roasted red chile powder, 1T galangal, and 1t cinnamon. Rubbed the loin, wrapped it tightly for two days, and roasted it in a 450F oven to 140F. It's great; just had a few slices for lunch, after last night's salad with it.
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#504 Bombdog

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Posted 23 July 2006 - 10:49 AM

Speaking of pork loin.

After my first attempt at lomo curado using a tenderloin (and failing miserably) I tried again with a loin.

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Wonderful, slightly sweet, with a nice fennel and garlic taste.
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#505 Dave Weinstein

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Posted 23 July 2006 - 09:38 PM

Country Pate with Vietnamese Flavors

This is a nice light country pate I made today, using the recipe in the book as a template. I wanted something I could use to make Vietnamese subs, especially since the heat is still oppressive. It uses pork, shrimp, and duck eggs, although hens eggs can also be used.

For ease (and since 4x$4.00 is a lot cheaper than a nice terrine mold), I use 12oz Ramekins for making pate. These are the perfect size for a tomato can to be used as a weight:

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I use caul fat to wrap the pate, so that it ends up in a nice tight shape and is easy to remove.

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And finally, a somewhat blurry cross-section:

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The white chunks in the cross section are pieces of shrimp.

#506 tristar

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Posted 23 July 2006 - 10:28 PM

Hi Dave V. and Dave W,

The Lomo and the Country Pate both look excellent, making my mouth water just looking at them!

Regards,
Richard
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#507 FoodMan

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Posted 26 July 2006 - 01:40 PM

Hi Dave V. and Dave W,

The Lomo and the Country Pate both look excellent, making my mouth water just looking at them!

Regards,
Richard

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Absolutly, both look great!

For the lomo, is that just a regular pork loin? It looks more sinewy and fatty than the one you typically find at the store. Details for this successful try would be greatly appreciated.

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#508 Abra

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Posted 26 July 2006 - 02:58 PM

Wow, you guys are making such nice stuff, even in this heat wave. How are you keeping what you have hanging cool? Er, you know what I mean!

#509 Chris Amirault

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Posted 26 July 2006 - 03:19 PM

Dave, that paté seems fantastic. How many cups of paté did you create? I'm trying to figure out the right sized mold.
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#510 Dave Weinstein

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Posted 26 July 2006 - 03:27 PM

Dave, that paté seems fantastic. How many cups of paté did you create? I'm trying to figure out the right sized mold.

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A standard batch (i.e. starting with around 2lbs of meat) gives a bit over four of the 12oz molds worth of pate.

I take what remains and roll it in plastic wrap and poach it.

I suspect, with a bit more extras folded in (I'm thinking chinese sausage, and possibly some sichuan pepper bacon for the next batch), I could go to a ffith ramekin.

Note to self. Buy fifth ramekin.





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