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#61 Anna N

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Posted 16 June 2014 - 04:10 PM

This "open braise" is a favourite of the Nielsen family:

http://www.epicuriou...Duck-Legs-14324
Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

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#62 liuzhou

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Posted 16 June 2014 - 06:47 PM

 

For instance, I love the thought of using duck fat instead of butter when making scrambled eggs.

 

I've done it. With duck eggs. It works, although I prefer butter.

 

 I have more happily fried duck eggs in duck fat.



#63 Hassouni

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Posted 16 June 2014 - 06:48 PM

 I haven't tried my hand at confit yet but that's a great option if you have enough fat or if you have a sous-vide unit - I am anxiously waiting for mine, which was primarily bought with the intention of making confit!

 

Mine was bought entirely on impulse, but as I anxiously await it, I'm thinking of confit possibilities too...That said, it's been said elsewhere that a typical Long Island duck will have enough fat on it to confit the legs (what's the right French verb there, confiser?)



#64 huiray

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Posted 16 June 2014 - 06:54 PM

...using duck fat instead of butter when making scrambled eggs...

 

I've done it, with chicken eggs, but I do it the "quick scramble" way, not the French slow-cooked way.  I like it.

 

Or with fried rice (so the eggs are scrambled in situ) like here.  :-)


Edited by huiray, 16 June 2014 - 07:12 PM.


#65 FrogPrincesse

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Posted 16 June 2014 - 07:40 PM

Mine was bought entirely on impulse, but as I anxiously await it, I'm thinking of confit possibilities too...That said, it's been said elsewhere that a typical Long Island duck will have enough fat on it to confit the legs (what's the right French verb there, confiser?)

My ears! It's confire :-)
I have a stock of duck fat that I've been collecting for a while in the freezer all ready to go for confit.

Edited by FrogPrincesse, 16 June 2014 - 07:42 PM.

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#66 huiray

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Posted 16 June 2014 - 08:13 PM

I have a stock of duck fat that I've been collecting for a while in the freezer all ready to go for confit.

 

I've recently started buying rendered duck fat.  In small amounts (like a ~1lb small tub-let I got, for ~$10, from my local butcher) it's relatively more expensive but in bulk it can be much cheaper.  Not the "imported from France" fancy stuff, that is.  This place is one of the lowest-priced places I've found and there are of course other places too.  (Shipping, of course, bumps up the effective cost)  Is there a place in San Diego where you can buy it in semi-bulk?



#67 FrogPrincesse

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Posted 16 June 2014 - 08:17 PM

It's just rendered fat that I've been collecting every time I cook duck.

#68 MikeMac

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Posted 16 June 2014 - 09:37 PM

I eat a lot of duck. Because I like it. It is also widely available and cheap here in China; cheaper than chicken.

 

95% of what I buy is farmed duck which I usually get directly from the farm near my country home. If I'm in the city, the local farmer's market does just as good birds.

 

Very occasionally, I will get my hands on a wild duck. They are great when they are great and miserable when they are not. The meat is very favoursome when you get a good, relatively young one, but often they are old, tired and stringy. The lack of fat doesn't help and the end result can be dry as .... No matter what one  you do to counteract the dryness.

 

Farmed duck are a lot more consistent and have enough flavour. Plus you get all that lovely fat.

This is so cool !!  I am a Canadian posting on an American web site learning from someone in CHINA!!

I consider Chinese cuisine one of the "mother cuisine's"  3.000 plus years of history in every dish.

Its a privilege to learn from you.


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#69 liuzhou

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Posted 17 June 2014 - 05:11 AM

This is so cool !! I am a Canadian posting on an American web site learning from someone in CHINA!!

 

It's more complicated than that. You are a Canadian posting on an American web site learning from someone from the UK who has lived for 20 years in CHINA!!

 

I'm not sure it is really an American website though. Sure it is based in the US, but you'll find it is very international.

 

 

I consider Chinese cuisine one of the "mother cuisine's" 3.000 plus years of history in every dish.

 

Actually many dishes and cuisines are relatively new. Sichuan and Hunan cuisine, for example, relies heavily on the use of chilli peppers which were unknown in China until introduced from the Americas by the Portuguese about 200 years ago. So dependent are they on them today, it is all but impossible to imagine what they ate before that.

 

Similarly, corn (sweetcorn, maize whatever you call it) is massively popular but was unknown 200 years ago.

 

Ditto, pumpkin and the other squashes.

 

Of course, the traffic hasn't been all one way, as I discovered today with Long Island ducks turning out to be just a variety of Pekin duck introduced to the US from China. There are many other examples. 


Edited by liuzhou, 17 June 2014 - 05:14 AM.


#70 Rico

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Posted 17 June 2014 - 05:31 AM

 

Shelby, on 13 Jun 2014 - 9:48 PM, said:snapback.png

Um, the "wild stuff with no fat that has spent it's life flying" is what we eat.  

How do you find the farmed duck varies from the wild?

 

Right there with you, Shelby, though I'll occasionally buy the farmed stuff if I want the fat or am dry curing them. Seems like down here they've all already used up their fat stores by the time they arrive. I'm lucky to get any at all on them. They do make great pastrami. Each has its place; they are almost completely different different ingredients. Like beef to venison.

 

As for SV prep of the wild ones, gfweb, I've done it a few times with a decent amount of success. My favorite prep is to take them whole (each breast is maybe two ounces), dip in a little batter and throw them in the frying pan for a couple minutes.