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Your Daily Sweets: What are you making and baking? (2012–2014)


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#61 Darienne

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Posted 05 January 2013 - 01:03 PM

I made this again, using 2 layers of sponge cake instead of ladyfingers. Love this cake!
Mexican Chocolate Icebox Cake
http://www.epicuriou...box-Cake-101955

Oh my goodness. Does this sound delicious. I read some of the original reviews about dipping the lady fingers in Kahlua and thought about dipping them in a Margarita mixture (my current obsession). Why not I ask. I think this is my next public dessert.
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Cheers & Chocolates

#62 merstar

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Posted 05 January 2013 - 01:45 PM


I made this again, using 2 layers of sponge cake instead of ladyfingers. Love this cake!
Mexican Chocolate Icebox Cake
http://www.epicuriou...box-Cake-101955

Oh my goodness. Does this sound delicious. I read some of the original reviews about dipping the lady fingers in Kahlua and thought about dipping them in a Margarita mixture (my current obsession). Why not I ask. I think this is my next public dessert.


There's nothing better than a good friend, except a good friend with CHOCOLATE.

#63 merstar

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Posted 05 January 2013 - 01:54 PM


I made this again, using 2 layers of sponge cake instead of ladyfingers. Love this cake!
Mexican Chocolate Icebox Cake
http://www.epicuriou...box-Cake-101955

Oh my goodness. Does this sound delicious. I read some of the original reviews about dipping the lady fingers in Kahlua and thought about dipping them in a Margarita mixture (my current obsession). Why not I ask. I think this is my next public dessert.


I've been making this cake since 2000, and it's fantastic. The only thing I do differently now (besides using sponge cake layers), is I replace 2 Tbsp of the butter with cream cheese for the filling. It comes out creamier that way. Some reviewers replace all the butter with cream cheese, but I thought it would compromise the taste too much, and taste too cheesecakey. Anyway, if you decide to make this as is, ie, with all butter, make sure you let it come to a cool room temperature before serving, and not straight out of the refrigerator - otherwise, the filling will be a little too dry, especially if you leave it overnight, which I recommend. But, if you substitute just a little cream cheese, as I do, it will be fine right from the refrigerator.

If you make this, let me know how it turns out!

Edited by merstar, 05 January 2013 - 01:55 PM.

There's nothing better than a good friend, except a good friend with CHOCOLATE.

#64 Darienne

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Posted 05 January 2013 - 04:09 PM

I've been making this cake since 2000, and it's fantastic. The only thing I do differently now (besides using sponge cake layers), is I replace 2 Tbsp of the butter with cream cheese for the filling. It comes out creamier that way. Some reviewers replace all the butter with cream cheese, but I thought it would compromise the taste too much, and taste too cheesecakey. Anyway, if you decide to make this as is, ie, with all butter, make sure you let it come to a cool room temperature before serving, and not straight out of the refrigerator - otherwise, the filling will be a little too dry, especially if you leave it overnight, which I recommend. But, if you substitute just a little cream cheese, as I do, it will be fine right from the refrigerator.

If you make this, let me know how it turns out!


With the holidays just over, it may be some time until the next fancy dessert, but I shall report back and thanks for the extra instructions.
Darienne


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Cheers & Chocolates

#65 deensiebat

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Posted 08 January 2013 - 09:42 AM

I made Mozza's butterscotch budino with caramel sauce, flaky salt and whipped cream.

Posted Image

It is insanely good.

#66 jmacnaughtan

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Posted 09 January 2013 - 01:24 AM

I made Mozza's butterscotch budino with caramel sauce, flaky salt and whipped cream.

It is insanely good.


What's the difference between budino, pudding and pot de crème?

Looks great, by the way.

Edited by jmacnaughtan, 09 January 2013 - 01:24 AM.


#67 jmacnaughtan

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Posted 09 January 2013 - 11:38 AM

The old favorite, the Paris-Brest. There's a pâte à choux "inner tube" holding it up, so it's not just a mass of praliné mousseline.

Paris Brest.jpg

#68 deensiebat

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Posted 09 January 2013 - 12:24 PM

What's the difference between budino, pudding and pot de crème?

Looks great, by the way.


I feel like people play fast and loose with the terms, but pudding (budino being the Italian version thereof) is stovetop, custards (like pot de creme) are in the oven. Puddings can use either flour/cornstarch or that plus egg yolks to thicken, whereas custards use just eggs because the starches would settle out before it sets in the oven.

#69 flourgirl

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Posted 17 January 2013 - 05:13 PM

The old favorite, the Paris-Brest. There's a pâte à choux "inner tube" holding it up, so it's not just a mass of praliné mousseline.

Paris Brest.jpg

Wow! That looks fabulous!

#70 minas6907

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Posted 20 January 2013 - 03:50 PM

Not sure if this belongs here, but I made a coco today and enjoyed some cinnamon nutmeg marshmallows I made earlier this week, those things are extra wonderful in the drink!

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#71 RWood

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Posted 20 January 2013 - 05:04 PM

I finally got around to making a bacon ice cream. It came out soooo good :). I used a basic base made with brown sugar and baked the bacon with dark brown sugar. I think what made it extra good is that I used the house cured bacon at work . It's so good on it's own, I knew it would come out great.
The top got mushed from the lid before I could get the picture.

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#72 Kim Shook

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Posted 22 January 2013 - 08:43 PM

jmacnaughtan – your Paris-Brest is beautiful. I would LOVE to taste that.

minas – what lovely marshmallows. I promised myself that one of the things that I would tackle when I was able to quit work was marshmallows. It’s been almost a year and I haven’t yet, but you give me some inspiration!

Baked a cake for one of Mr. Kim’s coworkers:
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My usual Chocolate Bar Cake with Michael Ruhlman’s Chocolate Buttercream Icing. Slice:
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This was delicious (Mr. Kim was able to save me a slice) and Michael’s icing is so light and delicate. It’s almost texture-less – just pure chocolate taste.

#73 Baselerd

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Posted 23 January 2013 - 07:53 AM

Out of the Elements of Dessert: Fig Ice Cream, Jasmine Tea Cake, Scottish Shortbread Crumble, Chocolate Sauce. The entire dessert was supposed to be contained within a melting chocolate box, but I gave up on that...

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#74 pquinene

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Posted 23 January 2013 - 09:46 AM

Chocolate mud cake with strawberry ganache filled chocolates and fresh strawberries. 21st birthday cake (& our present!) for my brother-in-law's girlfriend (Her name begins with 'M' hence the chocolates :))

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I would so love a piece of that cake!!!!

#75 pquinene

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Posted 23 January 2013 - 09:49 AM

I've been craving champulado. I made a small pot a few hours ago. It's short or medium-grain rice, water, milk, sugar, cocoa powder and a bit of corn starch:

Posted Image


Edited by pquinene, 23 January 2013 - 09:51 AM.


#76 jmacnaughtan

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Posted 23 January 2013 - 12:26 PM

Out of the Elements of Dessert: Fig Ice Cream, Jasmine Tea Cake, Scottish Shortbread Crumble, Chocolate Sauce. The entire dessert was supposed to be contained within a melting chocolate box, but I gave up on that...



I've been looking at this recipe- how well do the flavors work? Does the chocolate not just overpower the fairly delicate fig and jasmine?

#77 Baselerd

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Posted 23 January 2013 - 01:00 PM


Out of the Elements of Dessert: Fig Ice Cream, Jasmine Tea Cake, Scottish Shortbread Crumble, Chocolate Sauce. The entire dessert was supposed to be contained within a melting chocolate box, but I gave up on that...



I've been looking at this recipe- how well do the flavors work? Does the chocolate not just overpower the fairly delicate fig and jasmine?


I have to first say that for the ice cream I did not have access to fig leaves so I used diced figs instead. The fig flavor was slightly overpowered by the chocolate, but not so much to where I couldn't appreciate it. The jasmine cake flavor was a bit light (probably by design, it was nice and refreshing), but it worked well - although I might increase the amount of ground jasmine tea if I make it next time since I prefer heavier desserts usually.

#78 rod rock

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Posted 23 January 2013 - 01:51 PM

That is one yummy looking champulado Pquinene!

Edited by rod rock, 23 January 2013 - 01:51 PM.

"The way you cut your meat reflects the way you live."

 

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#79 pquinene

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Posted 27 January 2013 - 02:27 PM

My first attempt at making macarons was from a volume-measured recipe. They looked pretty but were hollow and crispy. Below is a pic of my second attempt using this link:

http://www.eatlivetr...#comment-61857.

An oven thermometer is an absolute must. Also, using this specific recipe, pull the macs out at 16 minutes. They don't come off the parchment paper until they are completely cooled! Forget about being able to lift them off the sheet while the pan is still in the oven or you will cook them to a crisp.

Then end result was delicious and you must absolutely wait till the next day to enjoy their best taste and texture.

Chocolate and Coconut Macarons


Posted Image


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#80 Kim Shook

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Posted 29 January 2013 - 02:30 PM

Paula – I’ve bookmarked that site. They look amazing.

I did two desserts for our daughter Jessica’s family birthday celebration on the 25th. Daiquiri Poundcake:
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And Pumpkin Poundcake with lemon curd:
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The curd is home made by my step-sister's English mother (we have odd connections in my family) and she gives it to us every year for Christmas. Absolutely delicious and completely unlike store bought.

She had a celebration for friends at her apartment on the 26th and my contribution was PB&J cupcakes:
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Since I haven’t yet found a great yellow cake, I did these with angel food cake. I used angel food for them the last time that I did them and liked that change a lot.

#81 Darienne

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Posted 29 January 2013 - 03:25 PM

Well done, KS
Darienne


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Cheers & Chocolates

#82 flourgirl

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Posted 02 February 2013 - 09:13 AM

I finally got around to making a bacon ice cream. It came out soooo good :). I used a basic base made with brown sugar and baked the bacon with dark brown sugar. I think what made it extra good is that I used the house cured bacon at work . It's so good on it's own, I knew it would come out great.
The top got mushed from the lid before I could get the picture.

My husband will think he died and is in bacon-haven. Looks yummy.

#83 RWood

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Posted 02 February 2013 - 06:39 PM


I finally got around to making a bacon ice cream. It came out soooo good :). I used a basic base made with brown sugar and baked the bacon with dark brown sugar. I think what made it extra good is that I used the house cured bacon at work . It's so good on it's own, I knew it would come out great.
The top got mushed from the lid before I could get the picture.

My husband will think he died and is in bacon-haven. Looks yummy.


It is really good. I only made a gallon the first time, and it sold out over the weekend. I just made another gallon yesterday. We'll see how long that one lasts :raz: .

#84 jmacnaughtan

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Posted 11 February 2013 - 04:30 AM

Zumbo entremet n°2: Tanzanie.

I used a standard 4.5cm high cake frame- the recipe doesn't state the height you need, and I should have used 6cm. That meant I couldn't fit in the chocolate jelly, but the rest of the layers are (sorry for no cut pictures, the cake disappeared too quickly):

Flourless chocolate cake
Tanzanie 75% cocoa ganache with salted chocolate shards
Cocoa meringue
Vanilla "crème brûlée" (I just made an anglaise and set it with 1% gelatin)
Chocolate sabayon mousse
Standard chocolate glaze

Tanzanie.jpg

#85 janeer

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Posted 11 February 2013 - 10:13 PM

That is beautiful

#86 Baselerd

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Posted 12 February 2013 - 08:46 AM

Here's the coconut vacherin from Eleven Madison Park, quite a few components. It was a ton of work (even by EMP standards), but the result was delicious - especially considering the lack of chocolate.

-Coconut Sorbet
-Passion fruit kaffir lime sorbet
-Coconut crumble
-Coconut meringue filled with passion fruit curd
-Pineapple (Bruléed and compressed with coconut syrup)
-Green Mango salad
-Coconut-Lime Yogurt
-Passion fruit pulp, mango, papaya
-Coconut oil

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#87 DianaM

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Posted 12 February 2013 - 08:49 AM

That looks beautiful! Am very jealous of your quennelling skills. :smile:

#88 Baselerd

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Posted 12 February 2013 - 10:03 AM

Thanks! It's not as hard as it seems - you just need to temper the ice cream/sorbet to the right texture and make sure you soak your spoon in hot water between quenelles.

#89 Kim Shook

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Posted 17 February 2013 - 10:16 PM

Darienne – thank you, ma’am!

 

Baselerd – all that coconut goodness!  I would SO love to taste that.

 

For Valentine’s Day dinner, I did Mr. Kim’s favorite – caramel apple crème brulee:

 

With an excessively brulee-d brulee.  I’ve never had that problem before.  I’ve always used one of those little kitchen torches before and now I have a big one and I’m wondering if it is too intense?  Anyone else ever have this happen?  This is just a regular vanilla bean crème brulee with a layer of sautéed apples and dulce de leche under the custard:

 

 

It makes for a messy looking crème brulee once you start eating, but it’s really, really good:



 



#90 Kerry Beal

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Posted 24 February 2013 - 05:18 PM

IMG_0494.jpg

 

Texas Cowboy Cake from the Just a Pinch website.  

 

Haven't tasted it yet - gave my dad a small loaf and will take another to work tomorrow.  Interesting technique - boil the sugar, water, coffee, butter, dates and raisins together then add to the dry.  No eggs.