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Great Yarmouth Gingerbread


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18 replies to this topic

#1 Creola

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Posted 26 November 2012 - 07:37 PM

I am in search of a gingerbread recipe like the one served at St. Marys school in Gt. Yarmouth. It was served with a pouring custard and had a unique flavor i can't discern.This was forty years ago by the way.Any tips would help , thank in advance.

#2 antdad

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Posted 27 November 2012 - 02:09 AM

The gingerbread known here in the UK is actually a cookie, I expect what you had is a ginger cake if it was served with custard so have a search for that, recipes appear to be similar on both sides of the Atlantic.

#3 Lindsey

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Posted 27 November 2012 - 02:36 AM

We have Gingerbread here in Scotland that is a cake not a biscuit. Try searching Kirriemuir Gingerbread

#4 Creola

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Posted 28 November 2012 - 04:44 PM

The gingerbread known here in the UK is actually a cookie, I expect what you had is a ginger cake if it was served with custard so have a search for that, recipes appear to be similar on both sides of the Atlantic.

Yes, it was a cake , I forgot about the different naming. I think the difference must be in ingredients used,like trecle versus molasses. I guess I was hoping for a more local recipe as even within the country the recipes I've seen have varied. I'm even wondering if if might not have been a ginger pudding of sorts.

Edited by Creola, 28 November 2012 - 04:47 PM.


#5 Creola

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Posted 28 November 2012 - 06:49 PM

We have Gingerbread here in Scotland that is a cake not a biscuit. Try searching Kirriemuir Gingerbread

I found a recipe for the Kirriemuir gingerbread on the Glasgow Guide Discuission Boards,she said when cooking it in school for the "weans"it would be steamed to serve with custard or baked when iced. I think this is the difference I'm looking for as it deepened the flavor when steamed , thank you.

#6 janeer

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Posted 28 November 2012 - 08:49 PM

I have no idea what the Yarmouth version is, but here in America we are big gingerbread (cake) eaters and it sounds like you are looking for something similar. It is usually baked, may be iced, most often served with custard or whipped cream (and in my family, also chocolate sauce). A steamed pudding (like a plum or Christmas pudding but ginger) is quite different, although great. Here are a few typical recipes to look at:

http://allrecipes.co...ed-gingerbread/

http://www.kingarthu...gerbread-recipe

My own favorite uses some whole wheat flour and dry mustard. I like it very moist and very strong and spicy.

Hope this is of some use.

#7 andiesenji

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Posted 28 November 2012 - 09:31 PM

A couple of decades ago (when I was still showing dogs) a friend from England, from a town in Norfolk, stayed with me for a couple of weeks while judging some dog shows here.

I made gingerbread and she "corrected" my recipe so it was more similar to "Fenland ginger cake" .

This recipe is very close to the one I made, "triple" ginger. She said it was usually served with lemon custard or during the holidays, brandied hard sauce.

I don't make this now because I am diabetic and it is just too full of sugar.

Edited by andiesenji, 28 November 2012 - 09:32 PM.

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett
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#8 Creola

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Posted 28 November 2012 - 09:57 PM

janeer- I like my gingerbread spicy also and have tried many American recipes but find I was missing something.It could be my memory as it was forty years ago I was in school there. andiesenji- your recipe looks like the Scottish recipe Lindsey told me to search for . I am going to try it because I think it looks like what I am looking for. The recipe I found is the same process also. Norfolk is where we were, so it might be the regional type.With fingers crossed I will be making gingerbread this week.
Thanks to both of you for your help

#9 SylviaLovegren

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Posted 29 November 2012 - 07:37 AM

There's a recipe in an old Joy of Cooking for "Parkin" which they describe as "made in Yorkshire especially for Guy Fawkes Day". I've made it many times and prefer it to most other gingerbreads -- I do add a smidge of cardamom to the spice mix:

1/2 cup butter
2/3 cup treacle -- melt together over hot water.
Mix in bowl:
2/3 cup rolled oats
1 cup flour
1 tablespoon sugar
1/2 t ginger
1/4 t cloves
1/2 t salt
1/2 t baking soda
Stir the dry ingredients, then the butter mixture alternating with
2/3 cup milk.
combine swiftly and don't over beat, the batter will be thin. Bake in 8x8 inch pan for 35 minutes at 350F or cake pulls away from sides.

It's very moist and if the treacle (or molasses) is dark, the flavor is intense. I always serve it with hot lemon sauce.

Edited by SylviaLovegren, 29 November 2012 - 07:38 AM.


#10 andiesenji

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Posted 29 November 2012 - 04:45 PM

I've got an old, old recipe for "Sticky Parkin" that is extremely sweet. One of the ingredients is ginger marmalade and a particular brand is specified. I can't find it right at the moment but will see if I can find it in one of my card files. I don't know if I ever transferred it to computer.
"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett
My blog:Books,Cooks,Gadgets&Gardening

#11 Creola

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Posted 29 November 2012 - 05:06 PM

There's a recipe in an old Joy of Cooking for "Parkin" which they describe as "made in Yorkshire especially for Guy Fawkes Day". I've made it many times and prefer it to most other gingerbreads -- I do add a smidge of cardamom to the spice mix:

1/2 cup butter
2/3 cup treacle -- melt together over hot water.
Mix in bowl:
2/3 cup rolled oats
1 cup flour
1 tablespoon sugar
1/2 t ginger
1/4 t cloves
1/2 t salt
1/2 t baking soda
Stir the dry ingredients, then the butter mixture alternating with
2/3 cup milk.
combine swiftly and don't over beat, the batter will be thin. Bake in 8x8 inch pan for 35 minutes at 350F or cake pulls away from sides.

It's very moist and if the treacle (or molasses) is dark, the flavor is intense. I always serve it with hot lemon sauce.

Thank you for the recipe,I will put it on my list to try. I had seen the Parkin but wasn't sure about the oatmeal in it. Didn't know if it would be drier than what I am looking for,but I do love oatmeal so I'll give it a go.

#12 Creola

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Posted 29 November 2012 - 05:26 PM

I've got an old, old recipe for "Sticky Parkin" that is extremely sweet. One of the ingredients is ginger marmalade and a particular brand is specified. I can't find it right at the moment but will see if I can find it in one of my card files. I don't know if I ever transferred it to computer.

That does sound good, I adore orange marmalade,and would like to try my hand at ginger marmalade even if it is for toast. I am going to try making some "jar ginger", I assume it is ginger cooked in a syrup. I think that will give the cake a lot of moisture. I think I will sub molasses for black treacle, unless I can locate some in New Orleans when go to get some fresh ginger. I did notice on my bottle of lyles syrup it is made with cane sugar so to sub corn syrup would give it a different taste.I'm trying to stay true to the ingredients . Thanks again.

#13 andiesenji

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Posted 29 November 2012 - 07:02 PM

Found the recipe.
Bunty Bowers' Sticky Parkin

Ingredients:
1 lb fine oatmeal
1 lb medium oatmeal
6 oz butter
6 oz lard
1 lb A-P flour
1 1/2 lb treacle (black)
1 lb Duerrs Chunky Ginger Preserve
3 teaspoons bicarb
2 eggs - large
1/2 oz ground ginger
Beer or ale - Bunty recommended Theakston's Old Peculiar - a Yorkshire product!

Method:
Sift the flour and ginger into a basin, then mix in the oatmeal.
Rub in the butter and lard then stir in the warmed treacle and ginger preserve.
Lastly, dissolve the soda in half a glass of beer, then mix it into the other ingredients.
The dough should be dry enough to fall in drops. It must not run.
Turn into well buttered cake tins lined with greaseproof paper, but only fill them three-quarters full.

Baking time:
About one and a half hours in a slow oven until firm.

Cool in the tins for half an hour then turn out and cool completely on a wire rack.
Wrap in wax paper and foil and store in a cool place for a week before you cut into it.
Cut into smallish squares, it's more like candy than cake.

Note by Andie - I use 4 8-inch square cake pans and have enough left over for a small (4-inch) tart tin.

According to Bunty, Duerrs is or was the oldest commercial marmalade maker.
"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett
My blog:Books,Cooks,Gadgets&Gardening

#14 janeer

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Posted 29 November 2012 - 09:41 PM

Found the recipe.
Bunty Bowers' Sticky Parkin

Ingredients:
1 lb fine oatmeal
1 lb medium oatmeal
6 oz butter
6 oz lard
1 lb A-P flour
1 1/2 lb treacle (black)
1 lb Duerrs Chunky Ginger Preserve
3 teaspoons bicarb
2 eggs - large
1/2 oz ground ginger
Beer or ale - Bunty recommended Theakston's Old Peculiar - a Yorkshire product!

Method:
Sift the flour and ginger into a basin, then mix in the oatmeal.
Rub in the butter and lard then stir in the warmed treacle and ginger preserve.
Lastly, dissolve the soda in half a glass of beer, then mix it into the other ingredients.
The dough should be dry enough to fall in drops. It must not run.
Turn into well buttered cake tins lined with greaseproof paper, but only fill them three-quarters full.

Baking time:
About one and a half hours in a slow oven until firm.

Cool in the tins for half an hour then turn out and cool completely on a wire rack.
Wrap in wax paper and foil and store in a cool place for a week before you cut into it.
Cut into smallish squares, it's more like candy than cake.

Note by Andie - I use 4 8-inch square cake pans and have enough left over for a small (4-inch) tart tin.

According to Bunty, Duerrs is or was the oldest commercial marmalade maker.

That sounds awfully interesting to me.

#15 andiesenji

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Posted 29 November 2012 - 10:24 PM

I left out a single line.
The eggs are beaten and added with the treacle and marmalade.
"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett
My blog:Books,Cooks,Gadgets&Gardening

#16 Creola

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Posted 30 November 2012 - 06:36 PM

I left out a single line.
The eggs are beaten and added with the treacle and marmalade.

Noted, thanks again

#17 Harters

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Posted 02 December 2012 - 06:26 AM

Another recipe for parkin here which, to my tastebuds, seems a more accurate version of the cake we eat in northern England.
http://britishfood.a...yorksparkin.htm
John Hartley

#18 SylviaLovegren

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Posted 02 December 2012 - 06:42 AM

Time for a Parkin tasting party! Who's with me?

#19 Creola

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Posted 03 December 2012 - 07:54 AM

Are you coming to Louisiana are am I going up there? Ha,I have just joined so I haven't done this before, but I'm in. What are the rules ? I'm a baker by profession, can I make it at my shop or do I have to do it at home? Is it just Parkin or can it be and /or gingerbread also? Is there a time span?