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Your most disliked trend in the food industry.


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#271 gfweb

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Posted 27 May 2013 - 10:31 AM

Children in elementary schools are served their noon meal with a "spork" like a prisoner.  How are these kids ever going to learn to manipulate a knife and fork?

 
 
From what I see in restaurants, the kids' parents don't know how to use utensils either.



#272 annabelle

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Posted 27 May 2013 - 11:56 AM

That's true, gfweb.  I guess you can't teach what you never learned yourself!

 

This really is a pet peeve of mine, is the constant snacking.  I grew up in a household that did not serve snacks and when I was grown, I never learned to like them since I wouldn't eat my meals if I ate a snack.  Consequently, I have really never had to watch my weight even though I enjoy desserts and bake a great deal.  Of course, this isn't true for everyone and it is just an anecdote.  Still, looking around at my shlubby townsfolk with their giant drinks and giant bags of snacks always at arm's length gives one pause.



#273 Shalmanese

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Posted 27 May 2013 - 06:46 PM

Michel Roux related a story of something that happened in his restaurant in a letter republished in Sat Bains' new book "Too many chiefs and only one Indian."
 
I'll summarise.
 
Two couples come into the restaurant five minutes apart, both order aperitifs and the five-course tasting menu.
 
After the meal, which spread over a few hours, they both asked for their bills. The first husband said "I hope it comes quicker than the meal did." Michel went to see him and was told that the service was slow and apparently inefficient.
 
The second couple then asked for their bill. The husband said that the meal was good but serving five courses in two hours was just too rushed to let them enjoy it.
 
Michel said to the second gentlemen "let me introduce you to someone who doesn't seem to share your point of view."
 
He the asked them to see if they could mutually come up with a solution to what he should do to make people happy. Needless to say they disagreed and continue to do so.
 
This story may help us all to put perspective on comments that there is such a thing as "proper" pacing and that restaurants are "doing it wrong."

Why don't you just ask me and I can tell you how fast I'd like the food to come out!
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#274 Twyst

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Posted 27 May 2013 - 09:20 PM

Water lists (and even water sommeliers in a few places!).   Ridiculous.


Edited by Twyst, 27 May 2013 - 09:26 PM.


#275 scubadoo97

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Posted 28 May 2013 - 05:19 AM

Water lists (and even water sommeliers in a few places!). Ridiculous.


Beyond ridiculous

#276 Mofassah

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Posted 28 May 2013 - 06:05 AM

Water lists (and even water sommeliers in a few places!).   Ridiculous.

Good grief. You are joking now right? I mean it's OK to list a couple of waters on the beverage menu, like with or without bubbles, with or without a lemon twist and maybe even a couple of brands, since they actually do taste a bit different, but make a standalone water list is just stoopid. And "water sommeliers" got to be a joke. Please tell me it's a joke.



#277 Panaderia Canadiense

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Posted 28 May 2013 - 07:04 AM

It's not a joke.

 

Speaking now from a third-world country, the worst trend here is pre-packaged everything.  It's killing kitchen skills.


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#278 Twyst

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Posted 28 May 2013 - 08:44 AM

The number of people who are choosing to go dairy and gluten free is also getting really annoying, and more annoying than that are the steadily number of people who don't inform restaurants of dietary restrictions when they make their reservations (we even make it a point to ask when they make their reservation).  I work in a restaurant that only offers a tasting menu, so if we don't know you are coming in with a GF, dairy free, allergic to onions and garlic dietary request you probably aren't going to get anywhere near the quality of food you would have had we had time to prepare for you.


Edited by Twyst, 28 May 2013 - 08:47 AM.


#279 PSmith

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Posted 29 May 2013 - 12:57 PM

Twyst - you are so right.  I have an issue with dairy products being an eczema sufferer, but I won’t ever phone up a restaurant in advance to ask for a non-dairy meal.  I much prefer to try and work round it or even throw caution to the wind and enjoy the full experience – dairy included.

 

I have an acquaintance who has just invited herself over to an annual lunch.  However she is a vegetarian (the attention whore type) and I know the restaurant involved is not vegetarian friendly.  I cannot face the drama of her realising that she will have to make do with a plate of chips. As yet I have managed to fend her off.


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#280 furzzy

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Posted 03 June 2013 - 10:11 AM

Lots of papers presented above. Many from the dark ages. Some not relevant. Some maybe relevant...hard to judge without looking up the whole reference.

I'm sure plenty of studies also exist that fail to show dangers from irradiated food.

Whatever the case with irradiation one needs to see it in context with other things we do to food...like grilling it or baking it..and what potentially toxic stuff is generated the old fashioned way.


But with Irradiated foods, as with GMO's, these are things done to the "foods" before they reach us. Grilling or baking is something we decide for ourselves.

#281 furzzy

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Posted 03 June 2013 - 10:16 AM

Making it really really difficult to find cream that's not ultra-pasteurized. Stuff has a dead taste that I dislike intensely but even a lot of health food stores sell only organic ultra-pasteurized. Grrrrr.



YES!!! Not only that, the ultra-pasteurized doesn't increase in volume when whipped. It's finally reached the point that I simply can't find plain old pasteurized...and I continue to ask, & ask, & ask. Wish I were in an area where I could raw milk, where the cream floats to the top.

#282 furzzy

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Posted 03 June 2013 - 11:17 AM

Idiotic menu items such as "Cornish hen coq au vin".If you don't know basic biology, I don't trust you to make my food.Didn't you get a sex education?Did you really import your HEN from Cornwall to Canada?Or are you just being pompous? And ignorant?


This is a plac where quotes might be appropriate: Cornish Hen a la "Coq au Vin"
Or: Cornish Hen in the method of "Coq au Vin"

(sorry about the missing accent grave over the "a" - got a new Logitech keyboard for my iPad, & have it set up for both French & English, but when I get to the French, I can't get the accents & other diacritical marks to work properly -- yet!)

#283 furzzy

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Posted 03 June 2013 - 11:33 AM

re: GMOs and Irradiation resistance not logical.Someone could also make the argument that eating Oscar Meyer Lunchables on a regular basis is a logical thing to do!Sorry, it's not for me!!I think that the food sovereignty and freedom of choice are defensible positions.~Martin

Of course they are defensible. They just have nothing to do with whether irradiation is safe. You can choose not to eat irradiated food, but we aren't discussing your choice.

We are (were) discussing choices...disliked trends in the food industry. Not food safety, safe food trends, unsafe foods trends. So...he doesn't like GMO's and Irradiation. That's okay. It's his choice to dislike those things for whatever reason, or no reason at all.

#284 annabelle

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Posted 03 June 2013 - 01:39 PM

Disliking a trend or a thing for no reason at all is silly and not a respectable position to take and be taken seriously.  Irradiated foods have been sold for decades in Europe.  GMOs give us the ability to reduce famine and disease.   Being against practices that are nationwide, indeed worldwide and decades old "for no reason at all" is preposterous.



#285 lesliec

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Posted 03 June 2013 - 07:24 PM

I'm not sure if this is an international trend - it's certainly not entirely local, judging by some California oranges I bought recently - but I'm increasingly maddened by the little stickers on my apples, oranges, tomatoes and various other individual items of produce.

 

These things seem to serve little purpose other than to tell me the variety of fruit and/or where it came from.  I already know that; I can read the side of the box, or the sign at the market.  The little beasts are a fiddle to remove; they won't break down in the compost if I don't take them off, and they're not fun to bite if I miss one.  And surely they must add (albeit slightly) to the cost of bringing the fruit to market.

 

Consumers of the world, rise up.  You have nothing to lose but the stickers on your tomatoes.  I hope ...


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#286 mkayahara

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Posted 04 June 2013 - 06:16 AM

These things seem to serve little purpose other than to tell me the variety of fruit and/or where it came from.

I've always assumed their purpose was to save stores from having to train their cashiers to distinguish between Granny Smith and Mutsu apples on sight...


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#287 annabelle

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Posted 04 June 2013 - 08:39 AM

It's inventory control.  If all of the Fuji apples are just sitting around and the Granny Smiths are flying off the shelves or vice versa, the stores will know which apples to order more or less of.



#288 lesliec

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Posted 05 June 2013 - 06:14 PM

But they'll know that just by looking at the shelves!

 

The way our supermarket works, the weighing machines allow you to select what you've bought then print a price label based on the exact weight and type of fruit/veg.  Granted not evrey market does that, but even the ones that don't generally give you the means of writing a product code on the bag.  So stock control is based on the checkout registering that I've bought, say, 1.5kg of Granny Smiths or Fujis.  Individual stickers don't help that at all.

 

Yeah, I know, lost cause ...


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#289 annabelle

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Posted 05 June 2013 - 06:44 PM

The stickers are fixed at the processing plants.  The produce goes out to vendors who in turn sell it to the markets.  The inventory control goes far beyond what you may be picking up at Trader Joe's or the gas station, even.



#290 Ashen

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Posted 06 June 2013 - 12:47 AM

most of those stickers have plu numbers..  product look up..     the numbers do give you a bit of info though.. 4 digit numbers starting with 3 or 4 are conventionally grown..  5 digit starting with a 9 is organic produce.    plu's are voluntary so  even though there is 5 number  number combination that starts with 8 that is supposed to  tell you whether something is GM   almost no producers use it as they don't want to advertise it being gm. they just use  the conventional plu's 


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#291 liuzhou

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Posted 06 June 2013 - 04:43 AM

Idiotic menu items such as "Cornish hen coq au vin".If you don't know basic biology, I don't trust you to make my food.

 

 

Cow Cod (or Cock) Soup has been a favourite in Jamaica for a very long time. 



#292 pep.

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Posted 06 June 2013 - 02:59 PM

Disliking a trend or a thing for no reason at all is silly and not a respectable position to take and be taken seriously.  Irradiated foods have been sold for decades in Europe.  GMOs give us the ability to reduce famine and disease.   Being against practices that are nationwide, indeed worldwide and decades old "for no reason at all" is preposterous.

 

Actually, irradiated food is seen as a US thing in (at least this part of) Europe. Only dried spices and herbs may be irradiated at all and it has to be labeled as having been treated with ionizing radiation. Other European countries allow more types of food to be treated this way, but there's a lot of controversy about it.



#293 Twyst

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Posted 07 August 2013 - 12:39 PM

Water lists (and even water sommeliers in a few places!).   Ridiculous.

Good grief. You are joking now right? I mean it's OK to list a couple of waters on the beverage menu, like with or without bubbles, with or without a lemon twist and maybe even a couple of brands, since they actually do taste a bit different, but make a standalone water list is just stoopid. And "water sommeliers" got to be a joke. Please tell me it's a joke.

Saw  this today  :laugh:

 

http://eater.com/arc...-water-menu.php



#294 Tri2Cook

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Posted 08 August 2013 - 03:42 AM

 

Water lists (and even water sommeliers in a few places!).   Ridiculous.

Good grief. You are joking now right? I mean it's OK to list a couple of waters on the beverage menu, like with or without bubbles, with or without a lemon twist and maybe even a couple of brands, since they actually do taste a bit different, but make a standalone water list is just stoopid. And "water sommeliers" got to be a joke. Please tell me it's a joke.

Saw  this today  :laugh:

 

http://eater.com/arc...-water-menu.php


A water sommelier? I think we've reached the point where some great celestial being should reach down and give us, as a species, a giant collective wedgie and tell us to get over ourselves.


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#295 gfweb

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Posted 08 August 2013 - 04:52 AM

How much does one tip on water?



#296 Porthos

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Posted 08 August 2013 - 09:23 AM

This water had a very light nose and a wet finish. And the waiter did not let me look at the cap first.


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#297 annabelle

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Posted 08 August 2013 - 01:28 PM

Worse, they wouldn't let you inspect the tap.


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#298 rx6006

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Posted 17 August 2013 - 06:34 PM

I never thought I'd speak ill of such a treat, but...bacon. The proliferation of bacon into every possible facet of cuisine, from the greasiest of spoons to the most cutting edge of cuisine nouveau establishments. While I believe bacon has a place of honor in the culinary pantheon of ingredients, I do not believe that adding bacon to an otherwise poorly executed dish magically removes all impediments to flavor and delivers a winning bite. 


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