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Substitution for Maltose in David Chang's rotisserie duck?


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12 replies to this topic

#1 abadoozy

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Posted 17 November 2012 - 07:07 AM

I'm thinking of making the "Chinese Turkey" recipe in the latest Lucky Peach, which is subtitled as Momofuku SSam Bar's rotisserie duck. Not going to do it for Thanksgiving, because that would give my poor parents a heart attack, but maybe sometime before Christmas.

The recipe calls for 2 cups of maltose for the glaze. There are no Asian grocers anywhere near me, nor can I find it on Amazon (where I can count on free or cheap shipping).

I did a little googling, and some sites say that it's a very neutral sweet flavor, and honey or corn syrup can be substituted with very little difference. True?

I'll find it online and ship it in if it's truly required, but I'm guessing it'd cost me at least $10-$15 by the time I pay shipping, so if it's true that I can substitute something more easily aquired, I'll do that. But I'd like to hear from someone with more experience - am I going to end up with something vastly different if I substitute?

#2 Kerry Beal

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Posted 17 November 2012 - 08:15 AM

Is barley malt syrup the same thing?

#3 radtek

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Posted 17 November 2012 - 08:21 AM

Not really. Barley malt syrup is only 65% maltose and isn't neutral at all. Has a very distinctive malty flavor which might play well in this recipe. Corn syrup would be more neutral; but I almost always eschew CS when possible.

#4 Kerry Beal

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Posted 17 November 2012 - 10:52 AM

Looks like you'll find it in places for brewing your own beer. They seem to be calling it brewing sugar/syrup.

#5 radtek

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Posted 17 November 2012 - 11:28 AM

Looks like you'll find it in places for brewing your own beer. They seem to be calling it brewing sugar/syrup.


Liquid malt extract Or LME. The lightest would be preferable. I would recommend the dry version or DME as it stores better and is easier to handle.

#6 abadoozy

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Posted 18 November 2012 - 06:10 AM

Once again, small town. There's no beer-brewing place, either. My husband brews; he ships his materials in.

I'm leaning towards trying honey. Anyone think that would be a total disaster?

#7 radtek

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Posted 18 November 2012 - 07:24 AM

I don't. Sometime you gotta use what's on hand. It may not be "true" to the recipe but IMO sometimes that's unavoidable or even preferable.

#8 Kerry Beal

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Posted 18 November 2012 - 07:32 AM

I'd use white corn syrup instead - less sweet - honey is sweeter than sugar, glucose less than.

#9 Doodad

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Posted 20 November 2012 - 03:30 PM

Another vote for corn syrup. The stuff from brew stores will have some flavor additives.

#10 radtek

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Posted 20 November 2012 - 05:46 PM

Another vote for corn syrup. The stuff from brew stores will have some flavor additives.


Like what? And corn syrup is hardly unadulterated.

#11 Doodad

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Posted 21 November 2012 - 06:01 AM


Another vote for corn syrup. The stuff from brew stores will have some flavor additives.


Like what? And corn syrup is hardly unadulterated.


But corn syrup is more neutral than the brewers malt syrup which has some definite flavors from degrees of malting of the barley.

#12 radtek

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Posted 21 November 2012 - 07:26 AM

The varying flavors of malt extract come from the different types of grain that make up the recipe. Some of these malts may be roasted by varying techniques and are included along with the base malt. Some are different strains with different malting methods. But there are no flavoring additives.

Despite my loathing of corn syrup it probably will be closer to Chang's intent; but if he uses maltose this is for the particular flavor it brings.

#13 Kerry Beal

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Posted 21 November 2012 - 05:25 PM

Have a little read here - looks like there are quite a variety of colours and flavours depending on the treatment.