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Best way to transfer bulk hot liquid


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33 replies to this topic

#1 Fat Guy

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Posted 16 November 2012 - 05:23 AM

What's the safest way to get 12 quarts of hot cocoa from a stock pot into a dispenser contraption? The require maneuver involves filling the dispenser from the top through about a 4" mouth.
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#2 HungryC

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Posted 16 November 2012 - 05:27 AM

I use a small long handled saucepan for such jobs. It holds about a quart and a half, is easily dipped into the large stockpot, and if you find one with a decent rim, it will pour nicely. You can buy mega ladles, but the longer handles get on the way. I use a little enameled 1.5 qt saucepan to transfer hot liquids from 80 qt pots....works great for me.

#3 Kerry Beal

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Posted 16 November 2012 - 05:51 AM

I'd add a canning funnel to the set up above.

#4 radtek

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Posted 16 November 2012 - 05:55 AM

I like to use a cheap plastic pitcher. Scoop and pour. Scoop and pour.

#5 mkayahara

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Posted 16 November 2012 - 07:21 AM

Siphon.

(No, not the whipped cream kind.)
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#6 HungryChris

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Posted 16 November 2012 - 07:36 AM

I don't do that kind of volume, but use a funnel and ladle for putting soup from a pot into a thermos. I got so tired of cleanup I now put the thermos in the sink with the wide mouth funnel in place and move the pot next to it. Same kind of thing.

HC

#7 lancastermike

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Posted 16 November 2012 - 08:22 AM

One of these would do the trick


http://www.acehardwa...2631240.1260936

#8 Fat Guy

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Posted 16 November 2012 - 08:38 AM

Love the saucepan idea. Totally did not think of that.

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Steven A. Shaw aka "Fat Guy"
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#9 Darienne

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Posted 16 November 2012 - 08:38 AM

Those wide mouth funnels have so many uses. I couldn't function without them.
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#10 radtek

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Posted 16 November 2012 - 10:21 AM

One of these would do the trick


http://www.acehardwa...2631240.1260936


Clever but is it food-grade rated for hot liquids? Probably not.

Considering the long-handled sauce-pan approach- holding a weighty sloshing hot liquid at the end of a sauce-pan and then extending it's length further sounds extremely awkward and hazardous. It'll have to be held uncomfortably with two hands most likely pouring will be difficult in the best scenario. Maybe a trip to the ER in the worst.

My $0.02

#11 slkinsey

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Posted 16 November 2012 - 01:25 PM

I second the siphoning idea. That's how I get the stock out of my gigantic pressure cooker.
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#12 f00b4r

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Posted 16 November 2012 - 01:32 PM

I use a squat plastic measuring jug that holds about 1.25 litres.
It is lightweight, designed to pour easily, easy to scoop the liquid into and to handle once full.

#13 lancastermike

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Posted 16 November 2012 - 01:33 PM

My favorite device for bailing liquids is my 4 cup Pyrex measuring cup. has a spout for pouring. Once you get it down to a reasonable amount go with the funnel and the free pour.

#14 HungryC

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Posted 16 November 2012 - 01:34 PM


One of these would do the trick


http://www.acehardwa...2631240.1260936


Considering the long-handled sauce-pan approach- holding a weighty sloshing hot liquid at the end of a sauce-pan and then extending it's length further sounds extremely awkward and hazardous. It'll have to be held uncomfortably with two hands most likely pouring will be difficult in the best scenario. Maybe a trip to the ER in the worst.

My $0.02

I'm not suggesting the use of a heavy high quality pot....a dime store enameled steel saucepan is lightweight, only takes one hand even when full, and is easier to hold than a stainless steel ladle. Here's my little pot in action, transferring pounds of raw shrimp into a large gumbo pot. It is equally useful in skimming fat off the top of a boiling 80 qt or quickly dipping out lots of boiling liquid. No burns or ER trips, at least 20 years + of use.
image.jpg

#15 dcarch

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Posted 16 November 2012 - 02:22 PM

One of these would do the trick


http://www.acehardwa...2631240.1260936


This will not work, if it is based on the Venturi effect, which I think it is.

dcarch

Edited by dcarch, 16 November 2012 - 02:22 PM.


#16 radtek

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Posted 16 November 2012 - 03:16 PM

OK Celeste I believe you. I was converted by that magnificent pot of scrimps! :biggrin:

#17 HowardLi

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Posted 16 November 2012 - 05:17 PM


One of these would do the trick


http://www.acehardwa...2631240.1260936


This will not work, if it is based on the Venturi effect, which I think it is.

dcarch

Yes. Unless you want to dilute your soups and stocks with water of unknown quality.

#18 Fat Guy

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Posted 16 November 2012 - 09:39 PM

Those who use siphons, is it just a piece of flexible tubing and you get it started with your mouth?
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#19 pbear

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Posted 16 November 2012 - 10:00 PM

Love the saucepan idea. Totally did not think of that.

If you go this way, be aware that Emeril has a line of saucepans with pouring spouts. They're not great pans (though okay), but relatively inexpensive and handy for this sort of thing. (I use them mainly for reductions and hot-packing sauces for pressure canning).

#20 Ashen

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Posted 16 November 2012 - 10:53 PM

I would use my large pyrex measuring jug (holds a little over 2 quarts) and a canning funnel. basically how I dispense large volumes of liquids for various purposes. this set up works well with a large freezer zip bag placed in an empty tall container with the zip folder over the sides for things like sauce and stock for freezing.. It keeps the zipper nice and clean.
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#21 HowardLi

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Posted 17 November 2012 - 02:11 AM

Those who use siphons, is it just a piece of flexible tubing and you get it started with your mouth?

Not necessarily, but you can certainly do so. All you need to maintain the flow is to have the discharge of the tube lower than the level of the supply. You just need to make sure you prime the tube first (evacuate the air). This can be done in many ways.

#22 dcarch

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Posted 17 November 2012 - 07:07 AM

Siphonig thick liquid does not work very well.

Also most tubing gets soft if used for hot liquid and tends to collapse.

dcarch

#23 slkinsey

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Posted 17 November 2012 - 08:28 AM

Those who use siphons, is it just a piece of flexible tubing and you get it started with your mouth?

You can do it that way if you're not too worried about sanitation (in your situation you would have no reason to be worried). Or, you can fill the tubing with water, pinch both ends closed, put one end into the pot of liquid, letting go of the pinch on that end once it is below water level, and then lower the other end of the tube into the target vessel and let go of the pinch. You get some small amount of water in the target vessel, but no mouth germs. You can also let the water discharge into a glass or something and switch to the target vessel once it starts pulling liquid from the pot (this can be a little messy).
Samuel Lloyd Kinsey

#24 IndyRob

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Posted 17 November 2012 - 09:09 AM

When I brew beer I just immerse the tube in the wort, cover the end with a thumb, and draw it out into the other vessel (on a lower level) and let go. A thick rubber glove might be required.

#25 Fat Guy

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Posted 17 November 2012 - 07:16 PM

What kind of tubing does one need to use in order to accommodate hot liquid?
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#26 dcarch

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Posted 17 November 2012 - 09:14 PM

Someting like this may work:
http://www.ebay.com/...=item5ae3a0f9bb

Also, I remember there is another kind of pump which can work. It is basically a round tube squeezed continually by two motorized wheels rotating in one direction. It is self-priming (poitive displacement pump without a piston.)

dcarch

#27 radtek

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Posted 17 November 2012 - 09:57 PM

What kind of tubing does one need to use in order to accommodate hot liquid?


Silicone but it is expensive. We use it in brewing.

Dcarch- it's called a peristaltic pump.

#28 HowardLi

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Posted 18 November 2012 - 12:14 AM

Someting like this may work:
http://www.ebay.com/...=item5ae3a0f9bb

Also, I remember there is another kind of pump which can work. It is basically a round tube squeezed continually by two motorized wheels rotating in one direction. It is self-priming (poitive displacement pump without a piston.)

dcarch

Oy, good luck cleaning that thing haha

#29 HowardLi

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Posted 18 November 2012 - 12:16 AM


What kind of tubing does one need to use in order to accommodate hot liquid?


Silicone but it is expensive. We use it in brewing.

Dcarch- it's called a peristaltic pump.

If moving the liquid were a usual part of the work flow I would recommend a peristaltic pump. Very easy to clean, robust, quiet, self-priming, does not shear the fluid much.

#30 dcarch

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Posted 18 November 2012 - 07:45 AM


Someting like this may work:
http://www.ebay.com/...=item5ae3a0f9bb

Also, I remember there is another kind of pump which can work. It is basically a round tube squeezed continually by two motorized wheels rotating in one direction. It is self-priming (poitive displacement pump without a piston.)

dcarch

Oy, good luck cleaning that thing haha


Cleaning a drum pump is not that problematic. There are no valves and pistons. It's like a centrifugal pump, except centrifugal pump is not self-priming.

Inside drum pump:
http://www.globalspe...0eaf4c9186e.png

A peristaltic pump is ideal, but difficult to find one with high capacity.

dcarch