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Egg life


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35 replies to this topic

#31 FeChef

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Posted 01 April 2015 - 05:39 PM

When in doubt, throw it out. No egg is worth days worshiping the porcelain god. You've been through enough already - don't ask for trouble.

Normally I dont agree with worry warts, but eggs are cheap, not worth getting sick for a few dollars.


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#32 palo

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Posted 03 April 2015 - 08:08 AM

I have an unusual problem in that I am allergic to eggs. That being said I do buy eggs to use as a binder, wash or as part of a breading process, seems I can tolerate them in those instances. I end up using 2 eggs out of a dozen and tossing the rest due to expiration issues. I don't have a reliable "nose" to use as an evaluation discriminater. I would appreciate a definitive process to help me.

p

#33 AlaMoi

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Posted 03 April 2015 - 08:43 AM

eggs will keep in the fridge for many weeks - two months even - past their "date"

 

it's really simple:  when you want to use the egg, crack it into a separate bowl and sniff.

if there is any 'off odour' toss them.

 

as an aside, don't go with the popular floating egg theory. . . .



#34 JoNorvelleWalker

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Posted 03 April 2015 - 09:24 AM

I have an unusual problem in that I am allergic to eggs. That being said I do buy eggs to use as a binder, wash or as part of a breading process, seems I can tolerate them in those instances. I end up using 2 eggs out of a dozen and tossing the rest due to expiration issues. I don't have a reliable "nose" to use as an evaluation discriminater. I would appreciate a definitive process to help me.

p

 

Pasteurize the eggs after you bring them home if you are concerned.  That being said I've left raw eggs in the refrigerator for a very long time.



#35 Smithy

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Posted 03 April 2015 - 03:47 PM

I have an unusual problem in that I am allergic to eggs. That being said I do buy eggs to use as a binder, wash or as part of a breading process, seems I can tolerate them in those instances. I end up using 2 eggs out of a dozen and tossing the rest due to expiration issues. I don't have a reliable "nose" to use as an evaluation discriminater. I would appreciate a definitive process to help me.
p

I agree that eggs keep well past their 'expiration date', as others have noted; I take weeks to go through a dozen. I don't have a definitive "good/bad" test for you, but here are three more ways to avoid the problem:
* Buy only half a dozen at a time, if your stores offer that option (many do on this side of the border);
* Split a purchase with a friend;
* Separate the eggs and freeze the yolks and whites, to be thawed as you need them. This last idea is the most work, but for washes and bindings you should be able to keep excess eggs indefinitely. (It may be just as practical to freeze whole eggs after shelling them, but I haven't deliberately done it. Eggs that I've accidentally frozen have split their shells but been fine except for possible textural changes.)

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#36 radtek

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Posted 04 April 2015 - 08:27 AM

In the fridge they appear to last quite a while but I keep mine just above freezing.

 

My friend with the MS in Biology eats a lot of eggs. He states that American "commercial" chicken including their eggs are rife with salmonella down to the DNA. So inescapable, that leaving unfertilized eggs out at room temp is obviously a bad idea as they are the ideal bacterial breeding ground which can end up comprising the bulk of an eggs' contents if left at room temp for too long.

 

I didn't find anything conclusive online except for a paper's reference to the egg's albumin rising pH possibly inhibiting further growth of the salmonella organism after the first 24 hours. So that might be the other side of the equation.