Jump to content


Welcome to the eG Forums!

These forums are a service of the Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, a 501c3 nonprofit organization dedicated to advancement of the culinary arts. Anyone can read the forums, however if you would like to participate in active discussions please join the Society.

Photo

Strange wonderful fish.


  • Please log in to reply
34 replies to this topic

#1 Alex Parker

Alex Parker
  • participating member
  • 58 posts

Posted 05 November 2012 - 01:07 PM

I am doing a dinner for 15 people and the hostess has decided on Fish as one of the main courses. But she doesn't want anything too common. I have done Salmon and Tuna for her in the past. I was thinking something like Monk fish but its pricey here as its trendy as all hell at the moment.

Anyone have any recommendations as to a fun weird, great tasting fish?

Thanks in advance.


Alex

#2 haresfur

haresfur
  • participating member
  • 1,073 posts
  • Location:Bendigo Australia

Posted 05 November 2012 - 01:21 PM

What part of the world? Maybe whole sole or plaice.
It's almost never bad to feed someone.

#3 Nayan Gowda

Nayan Gowda
  • participating member
  • 185 posts
  • Location:UK currently

Posted 05 November 2012 - 01:21 PM

It would probably be helpful to know where in the world you are
Itinerant winemaker

Follow me on Twitter

#4 pacman1978

pacman1978
  • participating member
  • 59 posts

Posted 05 November 2012 - 01:23 PM

Monkfish for me is an amazing fish, so meaty and robust that it really stands up well to bold flavours. Few fish I can think of are:

Turbot - also slightly expensive but a beutiful clean tasting fish
Mackarel - nice and oily and so goes well with sharp flavours to cut through the oiliness. Cheap as hell here in the uk - goes really well with beetroot and horseradish
Swordfish - Very similar to tuna in texture, really meaty and can be handled in a similar way
Mullet - Mediterranean fish that can be nice stuffed with lemon, herbs, etc and roasted.
Trout - similar to salmon really nice cooked en pappiotte
Cod/Haddock - very common in the uk meaty clean tasting fish although probably a little boring for what you are after.
Sea Bream/Sea bass - really good with oriental flavours

What type of cuisine are you thinking of cooking as certain fish lend themselves to those styles? Hope these are some ideas!

#5 Mjx

Mjx
  • host
  • 5,676 posts

Posted 05 November 2012 - 02:21 PM

Catfish.
Michaela, aka "Mjx"
Host, eG Forums
mscioscia@egstaff.org

#6 seabream

seabream
  • participating member
  • 181 posts
  • Location:Seattle

Posted 05 November 2012 - 02:29 PM

Skate.

#7 pastrygirl

pastrygirl
  • society donor
  • 1,024 posts
  • Location:Seattle, WA USA

Posted 05 November 2012 - 02:37 PM

sturgeon

#8 Beebs

Beebs
  • participating member
  • 671 posts
  • Location:Vancouver, BC, Canada

Posted 05 November 2012 - 02:46 PM

+1 for mackerel. So freaking good, mouth waters when I think about it....

#9 Hendrik

Hendrik
  • participating member
  • 21 posts

Posted 05 November 2012 - 02:57 PM

Expensive:
halibut
brill
John Dory

Cheap:
lemon sole
whiting
plaice

#10 Baselerd

Baselerd
  • participating member
  • 454 posts
  • Location:Texas

Posted 05 November 2012 - 03:10 PM

Sea bass is nice, albeit expensive.

#11 Joe Blowe

Joe Blowe
  • participating member
  • 660 posts
  • Location:SoCal

Posted 05 November 2012 - 03:11 PM

Thread is now about throwing out random fish names :rolleyes:

My vote is for sanma. OP can Google it.
So we finish the eighteenth and he's gonna stiff me. And I say, "Hey, Lama, hey, how about a little something, you know, for the effort, you know." And he says, "Oh, uh, there won't be any money. But when you die, on your deathbed, you will receive total consciousness."

So I got that goin' for me, which is nice.

#12 pacman1978

pacman1978
  • participating member
  • 59 posts

Posted 05 November 2012 - 03:14 PM

You can get farmed sea bass as well which is smaller but cheaper and still pretty decent I think..

#13 Beebs

Beebs
  • participating member
  • 671 posts
  • Location:Vancouver, BC, Canada

Posted 05 November 2012 - 03:44 PM

Thread is now about throwing out random fish names :rolleyes:


:laugh:

Well, if we're talking about "weird" fish, I'll throw in shark, skate or eel. If you have access to one, hang out at an Asian fishmonger, there's plenty of "weird" stuff there without breaking the bank.

If you want "fun" fish - a heaping plate of deep-fried whitebait. Not really an entree type dish, but so much fun to snack on!

#14 pacman1978

pacman1978
  • participating member
  • 59 posts

Posted 05 November 2012 - 03:56 PM

Eel is lovely - once had an amazing soup in a chinese restaurant with eel and pork belly. Only thing is it can be tricky to eat as has the bone that runs through it

#15 ScottyBoy

ScottyBoy
  • society donor
  • 1,251 posts
  • Location:United States

Posted 05 November 2012 - 04:02 PM

Did you sneak in a "What types are you thinking?" for her? Sometimes they won't get too out of the box and it may be a fish you could save on food cost . Also are you doing this dinner all yourself? I always have to factor in the size of the group with how hard the fish is to work with.
Sleep, bike, cook, feed, repeat...
Oakland, CA
My Place
My eGullet Foodblog
eG Ethics Signatory

#16 Alex Parker

Alex Parker
  • participating member
  • 58 posts

Posted 05 November 2012 - 04:56 PM

Sorry. Wrote that in a hurry as I am busy here.

I am in Ontario Canada. I was thinking about shark but its pricey.

To the person who suggested the Pacific Saury, I never really thought of it. The dinner is in two weeks, and in keeping with a late Autumn theme, the fish would go well with that. Maybe do something with a Daikon lime reduction, as those flavours lend well to the fish. Hmm.. I know there was a shortage in 2010. Are prices still on the rebound because of that?

Keep them coming!


Alexander.

#17 GlorifiedRice

GlorifiedRice
  • participating member
  • 1,246 posts
  • Location:Philly Burbs

Posted 05 November 2012 - 05:25 PM

SWAI! What the hell is that stuff?
Wawa Sizzli FTW!

#18 Mjx

Mjx
  • host
  • 5,676 posts

Posted 05 November 2012 - 11:44 PM

Sorry. Wrote that in a hurry as I am busy here.

I am in Ontario Canada. I was thinking about shark but its pricey.

To the person who suggested the Pacific Saury, I never really thought of it. The dinner is in two weeks, and in keeping with a late Autumn theme, the fish would go well with that. Maybe do something with a Daikon lime reduction, as those flavours lend well to the fish. Hmm.. I know there was a shortage in 2010. Are prices still on the rebound because of that?

Keep them coming!


Alexander.


I had shark once, and it tasted faintly of ammonia; I was told this was usual and 'special', but regardless, I'd say that if it is usual for shark to taste like that, you might want to think twice about it.

Also, what sort of presentation are you going with? Whole, skin and head on? If not, regardless of how 'fun, weird' your fish looks when it's on the slab, when it's served, it's just going to be 'fish', in which case, I'd focus on finding the tastiest reasonably priced fish for your purposes, and if the name isn't 'fun' enough, just find out what it's called in another language (e.g.the one whose cuisine is inflecting the dish as a whole), and use that.
Michaela, aka "Mjx"
Host, eG Forums
mscioscia@egstaff.org

#19 Alex Parker

Alex Parker
  • participating member
  • 58 posts

Posted 06 November 2012 - 04:07 AM

Heh. Not basing it on the name. My client has a love of seafood, and as such her pallet is exceptional, so "fish" taste isn't really going to cut it. I am definitely wanting do a whole fish presentation, skin on etc, and I am going to probably plate it on slate.


Did shark when I was in culinary school. Didn't notice any ammonia tastes within it, so I cant say all shark tastes like that. What kind of shark was it?



Alex

#20 Panaderia Canadiense

Panaderia Canadiense
  • participating member
  • 2,036 posts
  • Location:Ambato, Ecuador

Posted 06 November 2012 - 05:20 AM

Can you get your hands on a whole Dorado (Mahi Mahi)? They're very unusual looking creatures and would respond well to that kind of plating.

The other ideas I have are both expensive and difficult to source in Canada - whole piranha, steamed in banana leaf with garlic and taro root, is particularly delicious and a conversation starter; Arrowana is also extremely decorative and tasty, but I think you'd have to source it at pet stores.
Elizabeth Campbell, baking 10,000 feet up at 1° South latitude.
My eG Food Blog (2011)My eG Foodblog (2012)

#21 Hendrik

Hendrik
  • participating member
  • 21 posts

Posted 06 November 2012 - 05:50 AM



I had shark once, and it tasted faintly of ammonia; I was told this was usual and 'special', but regardless, I'd say that if it is usual for shark to taste like that, you might want to think twice about it.

Ammonia smell and taste is a sign of seafood gone bad. I have never eaten shark myself so I don't know what it's supposed to taste like, but If it tasted like ammonia it is very likely the shark you ate just wasn't fresh.

#22 GlorifiedRice

GlorifiedRice
  • participating member
  • 1,246 posts
  • Location:Philly Burbs

Posted 06 November 2012 - 06:38 AM

Hendrik? I think shark , like skate, is one of those fish that have no urinary tract and pee thru their skin...Thats why the ammonia smell
Wawa Sizzli FTW!

#23 mkayahara

mkayahara
  • participating member
  • 1,795 posts
  • Location:Guelph, Ontario

Posted 06 November 2012 - 06:39 AM

Or maybe it was actually hákarl... :wink:
Matthew Kayahara
Kayahara.ca
@mtkayahara

#24 Bjs229

Bjs229
  • participating member
  • 40 posts

Posted 06 November 2012 - 06:42 AM

Hendrik? I think shark , like skate, is one of those fish that have no urinary tract and pee thru their skin...Thats why the ammonia smell

Yes. The urea in the blood is released thru the skin. That is why most shark has that ammonia flavor. I believe that there are a few species that are more tasty like the Mako. You still need to bleed them quickly so the urea doesn't turn to ammonia.
Sent from my Nexus 7 using Tapatalk 2

Edited by Bjs229, 06 November 2012 - 06:46 AM.


#25 haresfur

haresfur
  • participating member
  • 1,073 posts
  • Location:Bendigo Australia

Posted 06 November 2012 - 06:52 AM

I am going to probably plate it on slate.

Alex

Well, there you go - skate on slate :raz:
It's almost never bad to feed someone.

#26 Hendrik

Hendrik
  • participating member
  • 21 posts

Posted 06 November 2012 - 08:06 AM

Hendrik? I think shark , like skate, is one of those fish that have no urinary tract and pee thru their skin...Thats why the ammonia smell

Oh I didn't know that. Is there any way to get rid of that smell? Maybe a light brine?

I have smelled ammonia on both cod and langoustines gone bad and only even thinking about it makes me feel sick. You can imagine I'm very hesitant to try a fish that has a slight smell of ammonia even it's supposed to.

Edited by Hendrik, 06 November 2012 - 08:22 AM.


#27 GeneMachine

GeneMachine
  • participating member
  • 13 posts

Posted 06 November 2012 - 11:07 AM

Dorade provencale would fit the bill. Robuchon has two good recipes in "The complete Robuchon". Basically grilled whole with tomatoes, garlic, onions, olives, rosemary.

#28 GlorifiedRice

GlorifiedRice
  • participating member
  • 1,246 posts
  • Location:Philly Burbs

Posted 06 November 2012 - 11:15 AM

What about Beltfish found at Asian mkts?

Long flat, silvery and beautiful

http://sushiandpassi...-belt-fish.html
Wawa Sizzli FTW!

#29 GlorifiedRice

GlorifiedRice
  • participating member
  • 1,246 posts
  • Location:Philly Burbs

Posted 06 November 2012 - 11:23 AM



BTW ^^ that is a beautiful way to present Mackeral
Wawa Sizzli FTW!

#30 Alex Parker

Alex Parker
  • participating member
  • 58 posts

Posted 06 November 2012 - 12:55 PM

Holy cow thanks everyone! Lots of different options here. Skate on Slate is hilarious. Has a nice ring to it as well! :P

I will be doing all sorts of research when I return home tonight. Again thanks for all the responses. I will be up late tonight!

Alex.