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Ganache: How do you make it?


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35 replies to this topic

#31 Panaderia Canadiense

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Posted 24 January 2014 - 05:42 PM

You'll get better emulsification adding solid chocolate to warm cream.


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#32 Lisa Shock

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Posted 24 January 2014 - 05:45 PM

You can, but, be careful about your temperatures. If you melt the chocolate first it's easy to burn it when the cream is added. Depending on the manufacturer, white chocolate can burn at 108°F and above, milk chocolate at 115°F+, and, dark chocolate at 118°F+.



#33 Alleguede

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Posted 26 January 2014 - 03:43 AM

You have your answer above by Kerry. But the answer is yes. If you do so you have to make sure that your chocolate mixture stays exclusively above 36C. You can add your cream in a 3 to 4 time pattern. Each cream addition needs to be emulsified. The first one will look as if everything went wrong, second will be better and finally you will have an elastic, smooth, beautiful ganache.

Never ever add boiling 95C an over cream to chocolate.

#34 Jim D.

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Posted 26 January 2014 - 08:14 AM

Never ever add boiling 95C an over cream to chocolate.

 

I always have the feeling that I am doing something bad when I add boiling cream to chocolate (previously I have posted the question, why doesn't this take the chocolate totally out of temper?), but that is what most cream ganache recipes call for--including many of the published experts (Greweling, Notter, Wybauw).  Can you explain more about your advice?



#35 Kerry Beal

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Posted 26 January 2014 - 11:21 AM

The other thing I've done with hot cream is to mix part of the hot cream with all of the unmelted chocolate - then add remaining cream part at a time and emulsify with a stick blender.  

 

Here is a link to the place I learned that.  


Edited by Kerry Beal, 26 January 2014 - 11:29 AM.


#36 Alleguede

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Posted 26 January 2014 - 04:03 PM

Never ever add boiling 95C an over cream to chocolate.

 
I always have the feeling that I am doing something bad when I add boiling cream to chocolate (previously I have posted the question, why doesn't this take the chocolate totally out of temper?), but that is what most cream ganache recipes call for--including many of the published experts (Greweling, Notter, Wybauw).  Can you explain more about your advice?

Kerry's view and link are true and so are the techniques she mentions. I have been to demos, classes, and test sessions with a lot of different brands and chefs and each time they show you one or two different techniques to make a ganache. Thermomix, whisk, kitchen aid, hand blender, emulsifier, spatula, Stephan, robot coupe,...

Anyway, when cacao butter goes higher then 50 degrees, it's particle reaction changes and the setting of your product loses many properties.

If your ganache stays within the 30/35degree range, all stays in temper. The mouthfeel, the texture, the elasticity,.... The binding all stays together. Which creates also a longer shelf life and all the rest.

A lot of it is chemistry linked to the cristals in the chocolate (beta) as well as properties of the different ingredients too.

Hope I answered the question. If not please pm me.

Edited by Alleguede, 26 January 2014 - 04:22 PM.