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eG Foodblog - Dave Hatfield, La France Profonde

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#31 KennethT

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Posted 08 October 2012 - 11:13 AM

Is gas that expensive in CA? Seems like the price is like $7.75 a gallon (using an exchange rate of 1.3 and a rough estimate of 4l per gallon.

#32 rotuts

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Posted 08 October 2012 - 11:24 AM

bad math, nothing new. :shock:

#33 Dave Hatfield

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Posted 08 October 2012 - 11:43 AM

Rotuis & Sapidus - The hyper Markets are common. Don't know about Mammouth as I wasn't paying attention in the 80's.

Just in Villefranche, a town of maybe 50,000, there are three big ones. That's in addition to at least three smaller discount type markets that I know of. They're very competitive with one another. One recently built a new store & both of the others quickly followed with major expansions. They all send out weekly flyer with their sale items & deals and they all have point based loyalty systems.

All in all they're pretty competitive, but they can't seem to beat the traditional outdoor markets for both price & quality.

#34 Dave Hatfield

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Posted 08 October 2012 - 11:51 AM

I forgot to explain the last photo in the Hyper Market post.

The Rentree is sort of 'back to school' equivalent here in France. All the stores make a big deal of it.

#35 rotuts

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Posted 08 October 2012 - 11:53 AM

How often do you have outdoor markets? is the food there 'local?'

#36 Dave Hatfield

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Posted 08 October 2012 - 12:05 PM

How often do you have outdoor markets? is the food there 'local?'


We could go to an outdoor market every day if we wanted to. Within a 30 minute drive that is.

Much of the vegetables & fruit is local, but, obviously, limited. Nobody grows oranges in our area for instance yet they are available at the outdoor markets.Much of the meat & fowl is local as is much of the charcuterie, but not all. Over time one learns to pick & choose for price/quality.

#37 Dave Hatfield

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Posted 08 October 2012 - 12:46 PM

I promised you a dinner dish so Ihope you've bought your chicken thighs, mushrooms, cream & tarragon.

Actually this dish arose because we feed our lovely standard Poodle, Rupert, on chicken thighs & dog biscuit. Linda was hungry one day after I'd roasted his chicken so stole a bit and pronounced it delicious. I guess it was the herbs I'd added. In any case I then developed it into a simple, but nice dinner dish.

Place your chicken thight into an oven proof container and liberally sprinkle the with: Salt, Pepper, Herbs de Province ans Garlic granules. Meanwhile cut up your mushrooms into slices.

IMG_1579.JPG

Put this into a 200 degree C oven and bake for about 20 minutes. first cook.JPG

Bring them out of the oven and turn them over.

2ond cook.JPG

Cook for another 10- 15 minutes until he skin is browned. Then remove from the oven & set the chicken thighs aside. Put the container over high heat on your stove top & add the sliced mushrooms. DO NOT POUR OFF ANY FAT. In fact you may need to add a bit of olive oil. Stir until the mushrooms just start to give off their juices.

mushrooms in.JPG mush cooked.JPG


Add some cream and tarrogon, stir and let reduce a bit.

Place 2 or 3 (depending upon how hungry you are) thighs on a place and spoon over some of the mushroom & their sauce. Enjoy!

on plate.JPG

We had ours with a baked potato and some broccoli. A nice, but simple main course.

ready to eat.JPG

Meanwhile because I'd done a second dish Rupert had chicken thighs ready for his dinner for the next couple of day. Spoiled mutt that he is.

#38 Anna N

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Posted 08 October 2012 - 01:31 PM

I promised you a dinner dish so Ihope you've bought your chicken thighs, mushrooms, cream & tarragon.
......


I am hungry just reading about this simple dinner. Right up my alley. Thank you for sharing. Am enjoying your blog.
Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

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#39 sigma

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Posted 08 October 2012 - 02:51 PM

Gosh, well done! My mystery object turned out to be not much of a mystery.

When can we expect you for dinner?

I'll have to think hard and see what else I can come up with.


Great! We are in between Sarlat and Perigueux. Just a short drive.

#40 Shelby

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Posted 08 October 2012 - 03:11 PM

Looks delicious! I definitely will be making this.

#41 David Ross

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Posted 08 October 2012 - 07:00 PM

I could easily be a hungry dog at your house.

#42 janeer

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Posted 08 October 2012 - 07:26 PM

Gosh, I can hardly keep up. The two kitchens: both lovely, but the rationale for two?

#43 Dave Hatfield

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Posted 09 October 2012 - 01:06 AM

Sigma - I'll send you a PM to start setting up the dinner or lunch. Not next week as I'm off for a golfing holiday.

Janeer- A few reasons for two kitchens. Space for storage, as you can see from the pictures the IKEA kitchen is fully loaded with stuff. In addition this gives us a self contained apartment on the ground floor which facilitates house swaps. A third reason is that we mainly use this kitchen during the hot summer months. The BBQ is just outside as is a nice shaded eating area with good views. Very pleasant place to have lunch or dinner.

David - Rupert like most dogs is never satisfied. He thinks he's hungry no matter what.

#44 Dave Hatfield

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Posted 09 October 2012 - 02:45 AM

.Its Tuesday morning and I thought that I'd share a morning routine with you. Lots of pictures, some are extra's to show you places of interest in our village.

#1.JPG As Rupert and I go to the garage to get the car its a bit foggy. But by the time we drive up the hill its pretty clear.


favel sign.JPG road 1.JPG .v2.JPG



The places listed on the sign are farmhouses not hameaux. Since we're at the top we have a nice view of the valley below. Its foggy now, but that will soon burn off.


v3.JPG Rupert's anxious to get on with his walk, no time for my picture taking. r4.JPG



parisot.JPG Although not very clear this picture shows our old village, Parisot, across the valley. If you know where to look one can actually see our old farmhouse.


wall.JPG We passed this nice stone wall and looked down at a little hameau. hameau.JPG


r5.JPG We retraced our steps and headed down the hill for Verfeil.


As we entered the village we passed the sign for the 'new' farm shop. botique sing.JPG sign 2.JPG

Actually the official sign put up by the village is nicer.

square.JPG We walked up to the village square as I wanted to take pictures for you.

halle.JPG restaurant.JPG farm shop.JPG



Here you have the old market (halle), the restaurant, Le Seye et vous, (The old village dog likes to hang out here in hope of a handout) and the now famous farm shop.

So much for the scenic tour. There are a lot of interesting old houses & the church is nice as is the marie (town hall) and the Salle des Fetes. Now we're off to the shop.


shop 1.JPG shop 2.JPG shop 3.JPG



As you can see this is a combination food shop, bakery and tabac. The tabac is a good source of revenue as is the bakery. Its also where all the notices for local events are posted. There's always a lot going on.


shop 4.JPG An array of their breads all freshly baked. shop 5.JPG


I'm refusing to be tempted by the croissants, pain au raisin or the pain au chocolate.



shop 9.JPG Hopefully you can just read the prices. Bread is sold by weight in France. Our favorite bread from this shop is their whole grain loaf, or as its called cereal.


shop 6.JPG shop 7.JPG The French are great newspaper and magazine readers. There's a magazine for every subject it seems; lots & lots devoted to cooking. Many are very good and I've learned to interpret most of them.

What would a French shop be without wine?


post box.JPG As we left the shop I took this picture of someone's letter box. Ingenious & effective.


poubelles.JPG As we left for home we passed the poubelles. The yellow tops are for paper & plastic, the grey tops for general household garbage. Not shown is the large bottle bank.


road home 1.JPG road home 2.JPG This is our road home.

The first thing when we got home was to feed Rupert. He likes his routine and didn't want to wait for his chicken and kibble.

Hope you've enjoyed this little tour. I'll post more later after I've decided what's for dinner today.

#45 Shelby

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Posted 09 October 2012 - 06:27 AM

It's so pretty there. I bet when the leaves begin changing it's stunning.

I laughed at the mailbox. I think if I did that here in Kansas that would be a federal crime.

#46 rotuts

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Posted 09 October 2012 - 11:14 AM

Paradise. fantastic cheese. fantastic bread. good wine. fine dog, and panoramic Dog Walks. all you need is a Cat to be best pals with the dog at home.

#47 Dave Hatfield

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Posted 09 October 2012 - 11:53 AM

OK, its dinner time. Since a couple of people sort of drooled over the Toulouse sausage in Monesties yesterday I decided to cook some at home today. Its the heart of a very simple supper for Linda & I.

First, however, our pre-dinner wine. wine.JPG with a few peanut to wash it down. .

A look at the view while I drank my wine. The second picture is of the church in Ginals across the valley.


view 1.JPG view 2.JPG


Next I started the salad salad greens.JPG

salad stuff.JPG cheese.JPG dressing.JPG

The salad ingredients are: Mache & rocette, Tomatoes, onion & cucumber, Blue de Auvergne cheese and my special creamy vinaigrette. I'll mix everything later.

sausage in pack.JPG bbq 1.JPG sausage 1.JPG


As you can see the sausage went onto our gas BBQ which I'd heated up to a high level.


saus 2.JPG saus 2-001.JPG saus not done.JPG

As you can see even though the skin is cooked the middle isn't fully cooked. The next thing was to cut the sausage into bite sized chunks & crisp it up a bit.


sauc cut up.JPG sauc finished.JPG



mixing salad.JPG The salad got mixed and the sausages put on the plates and we were off to eat our dinner while watching a BBC program called eggheads.


on plate.JPG


Not sure what I'll be doing tomorrow so I'll have to think about it. I may just try to pull out an old recipe. We'll see.

#48 rotuts

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Posted 09 October 2012 - 12:09 PM

What is that yellow topped 'puppy' with the dressing (sic) in it ?

Im dying here Id love dinner just like that !

wait: where was the cheese selection?

bummer. burnt sausage no cheese. :laugh:

Edited by rotuts, 09 October 2012 - 12:15 PM.


#49 Anna N

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Posted 09 October 2012 - 12:12 PM

.....
and my special creamy vinaigrette.

.....


And the recipe is? Please?
Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

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#50 Dave Hatfield

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Posted 09 October 2012 - 12:38 PM

The sausage wasn't burnt. We like the skin to be seared.

No cheese tonight as we had cheese for lunch. Cantal, Brique de Brebis and St Félicien with smoked garlic sausage.

The salad dressing which I make in my special dressing plastic 'decanter' is: (the decanter is just an ordinary container with a special top which seals closely and also has a flip up spout. Makes for great shaking up..)

3 parts olive oil
1 part white wine vinegar
A good dollup of Dijon mustard
salt to taste
Fresh ground pepper to taste
A good dose of herbs de province
a good dose of garlic granules.

Mix all of this well then add full cream until its amount equals that of the oil & vinegar.

Stir &/or shake vigorously until the ingredients fully mix.

This dressing will keep in the fridge for about a week if kept tightly sealed.

Edited by Dave Hatfield, 09 October 2012 - 12:41 PM.


#51 Dave Hatfield

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Posted 10 October 2012 - 03:20 AM

Lunch time. A friend has come over so I'm doing a bit larger portions of our toasted sandwich.

We're starting with some leek & celery root soup. Hot this time as the weather has turned.

It will go nicely with the simple little open faced sandwiches I'm doing. All you need is bread, garlic sausage, cheese plus some Dijon mustard & herbs de Province.

bread mustard.JPG Cut the bread into rounds and very lightly spread it with the mustard. As you can see a baguette is about the right size.


sausage on.JPG Place the garlic sausage slice on top. About 1/4 inch thick is good.


cheese on.JPG Put the cheese on top of the garlic sausage. Here I use Cantal, but a good sharp cheddar would be equally good.


h de p on.JPG Next sprinkle on a good amount of Herbs de Province. If that's not available then use a mixture of thyme & oregano.


on tray.JPG Place the sandwiches on a baking tray and roast in the oven or under a grill until the cheese melts and bubbles a bit.


done.JPG Remove from heat and serve immediately.


Very simple, but delicious. I normally add a few cornichons to the plate as I like them with these little sandwiches. Well, to be honest I like them with most things.

#52 LindaK

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Posted 10 October 2012 - 04:45 AM

Dave, thanks for sharing your quartier de la belle France. Much envy here, especially around the cheeses and good restaurants tucked away in small towns.

I made your celeriac soup last night. It was just the thing to use up the celeriac I'd bought on impulse. I didn't have any cream but added a bit of creme fraiche. Easy and delicious. Merci!


 


#53 SylviaLovegren

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Posted 10 October 2012 - 06:03 AM

The food looks delicious. The wine and peanuts and the view --- sigh. Need any house guests? :rolleyes:

#54 Dave Hatfield

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Posted 10 October 2012 - 06:42 AM

Lindak - Glad you liked the soup. I bet the creme fraiche worked a treat.

SylviaLovegren - Thanks for the kind comments. We do do occasional house swaps.

#55 FrogPrincesse

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Posted 10 October 2012 - 09:26 AM

Dave - you blog is making me so hungry! This is great. And thank you for the soup recipes, I will make sure to try at least one or two. Do you think the courgette/zucchini recipe would work with sorrel instead of watercress? I am trying to use what I already have. Thanks!

#56 Dave Hatfield

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Posted 10 October 2012 - 09:40 AM

Dave - you blog is making me so hungry! This is great. And thank you for the soup recipes, I will make sure to try at least one or two. Do you think the courgette/zucchini recipe would work with sorrel instead of watercress? I am trying to use what I already have. Thanks!


Glad you're enjoying it.

Don't know about sorrel, but its certainly worth a try. U
Iactually used mache (lamb's lettuce) in mine because water cress is hard to find here. Lamb's lettuce probably difficult in the states

Busy making a fish pie for dinner. Full report and post later. After we've eaten it that is.

#57 rotuts

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Posted 10 October 2012 - 11:38 AM

Yum! thanks for so many pic!

#58 Dave Hatfield

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Posted 10 October 2012 - 11:44 AM

Linda was out to lunch today, but it wasn't very good she said. Rupert & I were home and ate lightly; just some cheese & sausage.

Everybody was ready for a substantial dinner, but I didn't have a lot of time. I decided to make a one dish meal. In this case a fish pie. Pretty easy & pretty quick.

Here's the full recipe:


Ingredients: (this pie fill a 12" shallow round baking tin)
  • 1/2 pound scallops
  • 1 pound white fish (any nice types of fish will do. Or salmon would be nice as well)
  • 1 pound potatoes
  • 2 medium size onions
  • About 1 pint of milk or cream
  • 2-3 tablespoons of flour
  • 2-3 ounces of unsalted butter
  • a good handful of chopped chives
  • about a tablespoon of chopped fresh Thyme or the same of dried Thyme.
  • Salt & Pepper to taste.
  • On sheet of premade flaky pastry
Method:
  • Prepare everything. Cut the fish into bite sized pieces; Peel and cut the potatoes into bite sized pieces, chop the onions up finely. chop the chives & thyme.
  • Boil the potatoes until they are just soft.
  • Melt the butter in a large frying pan then gently sauté the onions until they are soft.
  • Add the flour to the pan & stir well until it just starts to color.
  • Add milk or cream, stirring until it thickens. Keep adding & stirring until you have enough thick white sauce to half fill the pan.
  • Add the fish & stir. You may want to add the white fish then wait 2-3 minutes before adding the scallops.
  • Add the drained potatoes & stir.
  • Add salt & pepper to taste.
  • add the chives & stir in.
  • Continue cooking, stirring, until the fish is cooked through.
  • Butter the baking dish then pour in the fish mixture & spread it around evenly.
  • Sprinkle the thyme over the top.
  • Lay the sheet of flaky pastry over the top, trim the edges and pinch the edges to seal.
  • Optionally; brush the pastry with milk or egg yolk & decorate with little fish shapes.
  • Bake in a 375 degree F oven until the crust is nice & golden brown.
Its just not that difficult and doesn't take much prep time. Mainly a bit of chopping. BUY the crust! Here are a few pictures:

fish.JPG onions sautee.JPG roux.JPG


Making the roux is the tricky part, but if you're careful and keep balancing the flour and cream you'll be Ok.


in pan.JPG DSC_0011.JPG Add the peas.

Put the crust on crust.JPG I goofed in the the bought pastry had warmed up too much so was sticky.


It still looked good coming out of the oven and when I cut it. out of oven.JPG cut.JPG

on plate.JPG


It tasted great and we both had double portions. Rupert got a small share and wolfed it down.

Quick & easy, have a go.

Market tomorrow!

#59 Anna N

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Posted 10 October 2012 - 12:08 PM

......

The salad dressing which I make in my special dressing plastic 'decanter' is: (the decanter is just an ordinary container with a special top which seals closely and also has a flip up spout. Makes for great shaking up..)

3 parts olive oil
1 part white wine vinegar
A good dollup of Dijon mustard
salt to taste
Fresh ground pepper to taste
A good dose of herbs de province
a good dose of garlic granules.

Mix all of this well then add full cream until its amount equals that of the oil & vinegar.

Stir &/or shake vigorously until the ingredients fully mix.

This dressing will keep in the fridge for about a week if kept tightly sealed.


Thank you. I have made a dressing from J. Pepin that uses cream and enjoyed it also.

Last night I made the chicken with mushrooms and cream and will be finishing it off tonight. Very tasty. Next time I would be sure to use a bit of oil in the pan though as my thighs stuck and left most of their lovely skin behind. My bad - should have thought of that. Will definitely make again as it is simple and fast.
Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

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#60 weinoo

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Posted 10 October 2012 - 02:44 PM

Dave - are you using fresh herbs in the herbs de Provence, or are they a dried mix, as is typically sold?

You make reference to garlic granules - same question - fresh or dried garlic?
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