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Cook-Off 61: Gels, Jell-O and Aspic

Cookoff

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65 replies to this topic

#61 Shelby

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Posted 19 October 2012 - 07:46 AM

My mouth is watering, David. It's a work of art!

#62 David Ross

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Posted 19 October 2012 - 03:59 PM

My mouth is watering, David. It's a work of art!


Thanks. After all that planning and testing I finally got to the end. It was one of those moments in the kitchen that we all have when we realize we've created someting very special and delicious.

#63 David Ross

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Posted 19 October 2012 - 05:29 PM

Tasting-
Gel Cook-Off 075.JPG

Sometimes words don't fully describe the senses you feel when you taste something memorable. One can use all the obligatory adjectives so often associated with foie gras, (often with terrible, overly-dramatic affect). But I don't really need to tell you anything more do I? As cooks and students of cuisine, we know that the true test is the taste test, and one hopes that these final photos portray my experience.

Until this Cook-Off, I never realized the legacy my Grandmother Pink had left me. I didn't even realize I had her gelatine molds until I looked in that back cupboard in search of my collection of molds. A call to my dear Mother, Janet Pink Ross, some 88 years old, turned my mission into something deeper than a Cook-Off. It became a journey of discovery and a remembrance of family.

Edna May Yount Pink was born in Lewiston, Idaho, in the 1890's. She graduated from Whitman College in Walla Walla, Washington, with a teaching degree in home economics--an incredible achievement for a woman in the early decades of the 1900's.

Those years at Whitman were the foundation of my Grandmother's passion for food, cooking and entertaining. Her first teaching job took her to Twin Falls, Idaho, where she met my Grandfather, Ralph Pierce Pink, who worked for his Father Max Pink at the family's wool pelt trading company. My Grandparents married in Kansas in 1917, where Grandfather was in basic training with the Army. (As the tuba player in the regimental band, Grandfather Pink was spared being sent to fight in Europe).

I never met my Grandmother Pink. She died in 1951, the same year my parents were married. A few years ago, my Mother passed-down her Mother's recipes to me. The collection includes a worn, black leather booklet holding forth a vast number of recipes for gelatine dishes. I have no doubt that my Grandmother served fancy gelatine salads to the ladies in her bridge club. Now, some 61 years after she passed away, I'm proud that I discovered the legacy that my Grandmother Pink left me--those little gelatine molds.

Gel Cook-Off 088.JPG

#64 janeer

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Posted 19 October 2012 - 11:33 PM

That is a beautiful thing, David. I have similar molds that I bought at a church fair in Rhode Island. Some have "swastikas" on them but I think (hope?) at the time they were made they were just an ancient cross design; they are quite old. Some say "Jell-o."

#65 Mjx

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Posted 20 October 2012 - 01:18 AM

Tasting-
Gel Cook-Off 075.JPG

Sometimes words don't fully describe the senses you feel when you taste something memorable. One can use all the obligatory adjectives so often associated with foie gras, (often with terrible, overly-dramatic affect). But I don't really need to tell you anything more do I? As cooks and students of cuisine, we know that the true test is the taste test, and one hopes that these final photos portray my experience.

Until this Cook-Off, I never realized the legacy my Grandmother Pink had left me. I didn't even realize I had her gelatine molds until I looked in that back cupboard in search of my collection of molds. A call to my dear Mother, Janet Pink Ross, some 88 years old, turned my mission into something deeper than a Cook-Off. It became a journey of discovery and a remembrance of family.

Edna May Yount Pink was born in Lewiston, Idaho, in the 1890's. She graduated from Whitman College in Walla Walla, Washington, with a teaching degree in home economics--an incredible achievement for a woman in the early decades of the 1900's.

Those years at Whitman were the foundation of my Grandmother's passion for food, cooking and entertaining. Her first teaching job took her to Twin Falls, Idaho, where she met my Grandfather, Ralph Pierce Pink, who worked for his Father Max Pink at the family's wool pelt trading company. My Grandparents married in Kansas in 1917, where Grandfather was in basic training with the Army. (As the tuba player in the regimental band, Grandfather Pink was spared being sent to fight in Europe).

I never met my Grandmother Pink. She died in 1951, the same year my parents were married. A few years ago, my Mother passed-down her Mother's recipes to me. The collection includes a worn, black leather booklet holding forth a vast number of recipes for gelatine dishes. I have no doubt that my Grandmother served fancy gelatine salads to the ladies in her bridge club. Now, some 61 years after she passed away, I'm proud that I discovered the legacy that my Grandmother Pink left me--those little gelatine molds.

Gel Cook-Off 088.JPG


I'm going to have to go with 'wow', which I realize is spectacularly inarticulate. This is the the first time I can recall seeing a savoury gel and thinking, 'I need to do that'.

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#66 David Ross

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Posted 20 October 2012 - 07:49 AM


Tasting-
Gel Cook-Off 075.JPG

Sometimes words don't fully describe the senses you feel when you taste something memorable. One can use all the obligatory adjectives so often associated with foie gras, (often with terrible, overly-dramatic affect). But I don't really need to tell you anything more do I? As cooks and students of cuisine, we know that the true test is the taste test, and one hopes that these final photos portray my experience.

Until this Cook-Off, I never realized the legacy my Grandmother Pink had left me. I didn't even realize I had her gelatine molds until I looked in that back cupboard in search of my collection of molds. A call to my dear Mother, Janet Pink Ross, some 88 years old, turned my mission into something deeper than a Cook-Off. It became a journey of discovery and a remembrance of family.

Edna May Yount Pink was born in Lewiston, Idaho, in the 1890's. She graduated from Whitman College in Walla Walla, Washington, with a teaching degree in home economics--an incredible achievement for a woman in the early decades of the 1900's.

Those years at Whitman were the foundation of my Grandmother's passion for food, cooking and entertaining. Her first teaching job took her to Twin Falls, Idaho, where she met my Grandfather, Ralph Pierce Pink, who worked for his Father Max Pink at the family's wool pelt trading company. My Grandparents married in Kansas in 1917, where Grandfather was in basic training with the Army. (As the tuba player in the regimental band, Grandfather Pink was spared being sent to fight in Europe).

I never met my Grandmother Pink. She died in 1951, the same year my parents were married. A few years ago, my Mother passed-down her Mother's recipes to me. The collection includes a worn, black leather booklet holding forth a vast number of recipes for gelatine dishes. I have no doubt that my Grandmother served fancy gelatine salads to the ladies in her bridge club. Now, some 61 years after she passed away, I'm proud that I discovered the legacy that my Grandmother Pink left me--those little gelatine molds.

Gel Cook-Off 088.JPG


I'm going to have to go with 'wow', which I realize is spectacularly inarticulate. This is the the first time I can recall seeing a savoury gel and thinking, 'I need to do that'.

Thank you, and I agree with you about savoury gels. From this dish forward I'm not going to think first about lime Jell-O and shredded carrots dressed with Miracle Whip. Nor will I consider the vision of trays of "Ambrosia" raspberry Jell-O with whipped cream. No, my thoughts of gel have forever been changed by the taste of Ice Wine Jelly and Foie Gras. The Holidays are fast approaching, so I think that's going to be the perfect time to craft more of these little beauties.





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