Jump to content


Welcome to the eG Forums!

These forums are a service of the Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, a 501c3 nonprofit organization dedicated to advancement of the culinary arts. Anyone can read the forums, however if you would like to participate in active discussions please join the Society.

Photo

Dinner! 2012


  • This topic is locked This topic is locked
3000 replies to this topic

#2431 FrogPrincesse

FrogPrincesse
  • society donor
  • 2,936 posts
  • Location:San Diego, CA

Posted 01 November 2012 - 11:45 PM

Frogprincesse - can you elaborate on the coconut spinach - it touches my comfort zone in so many areas

Heidi,
The coconut spinach is based on a traditional dish from the Caribbean, creamed callaloo (aka dasheen). It's from Ann Vanderhoof's book, the Spice Necklace, which tells of her culinary adventures aboard a sailing boat, a fun book which also happens to include recipes.
To summarize the recipe, you fry some garlic, onion, green onion, a small bell pepper and a piece of hot pepper. Then you add a couple of sliced okras, followed by the dasheen or spinach. When the spinach is wilted, you add about a cup of coconut milk and you season with s+p and nutmeg. At that point you cover and cook until soft (about 10 min for spinach). Finally, you blend for a short time with a stick blender making sure to retain some texture. You can also blend it a little longer and serve it as a soup.
It's very good with spinach and wonderful with dasheen, but I have no idea if the later is available in Southern California (I don't remember ever seeing it but I haven't actively looked for it).

Edited by FrogPrincesse, 01 November 2012 - 11:47 PM.


#2432 heidih

heidih
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 10,800 posts
  • Location:Los Angeles

Posted 02 November 2012 - 08:05 AM

Thanks FrogPrincesse - I have the book! On the menu for the weekend.

#2433 avaserfi

avaserfi
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 379 posts

Posted 02 November 2012 - 08:27 AM

Inspired by ramen.

Posted Image
malted pork jowl, xo demi, grano arso ramen, bacon and eggs

Posted Image
Andrew Vaserfirer aka avaserfi

Host, eG Forums

avaserfirer@egstaff.org



eG Ethics Signatory

#2434 Kim Shook

Kim Shook
  • participating member
  • 2,960 posts
  • Location:Richmond, VA

Posted 02 November 2012 - 12:47 PM

I can’t begin to go back over all of the fantastic food that I’ve peeked at over the past weeks that I haven’t been posting – I don’t think I’d be allowed to post that long a message mentioning everything that looked so good! Some of it looked like comfort food and some like pure indulgent escape from reality food and there were often times I needed one or the other!

But I do need to single one person out: Enrique, congratulations on the birth of your son! How wonderful for you and I wish you and your family so much happiness!

Thank you all for your expressions of sympathy and for the PMs I’ve received. We are slowly getting everything done and trying to get back to normal. The support and love that we’ve gotten from friends (including you ALL) and family has helped so much. I’ve passed on all the comments to my mother and she really appreciates it. She remembers when Ted used to post here and how much he loved taking the perfect photo to post and his joy when he could supply an answer to some query about English cooking/food. We used to lovingly say that he could Bore for England because he loved to instruct and lecture and eG gave him a lot of happy times that way. In spite of everything, I have been doing some cooking in the past few weeks.

10/12/2012 Dinner for Mr. Kim:
Posted Image
Sweet potato and turkey hash. This was a South Beach diet recipe that Mr. Kim found and wanted me to try. He and Momma loved it and thought that it would be great as a taco filling.

10/22/2012 I tried a Taste of Home recipe for brisket in a slow cooker with a sweet/sour cranberry-apple sauce. It was really good – the sauce was really rich and complex. I served it with sautéed green beans and long grain and wild rice – given that the sauce was so good, I think noodles or mashed potatoes would have been a better choice. Without sauce:
Posted Image

With sauce:
Posted Image

And the ubiquitous salad:
Posted Image
Which tasted more interesting than it looked. I found a ‘copycat’ recipe for Applebee’s Oriental chicken salad dressing (the only thing that I like when I’m dragged to an Applebee’s) and topped the salad with sliced almonds and fried noodles. A very successful copy.

10/27/2012 Tried a new recipe for a potato and caramelized onion tart:
Posted Image
This was good, but needs some work. I had a disc of Keller’s pâte brisée in the freezer and that was fantastic. I think that I’m finally cured of using prepared crusts! The potatoes were a bit hard still, in spite of me slicing them on the thinnest of the mandoline settings. I have this same problem with potatoes au gratin. The only recipe that ever works for me is Bourdain’s – in his method you slightly cook the potato slices by simmering them in the cream you are using in the recipe. That exact method won’t work here, because you don’t want the extra moisture, but I’m thinking that I could parboil whole potatoes and slice thin and then build the tart. Any advice for me here? We also had Dianne’s garlic shrimp, which was divine, as always:
Posted Image

Served with Aidell’s smoked chicken sausage with bacon and pineapple:
Posted Image
Mr. Kim wanted the sausage and Momma wasn’t sure that she’d like it (she did), so I made both. They were surprisingly suited to one another!

10/28/2012
Started dinner with some crusty bread, olives, herbs and olive oil and tapenade:
Posted Image
The oil and herbs was a Christmas gift and I’d tucked it away thinking that it was one of those crappy gift sets that people buy for ‘foodies’. I took a closer look and realized that it was from an olive oil store in Charlottesville. This is a new breed of stores for our area (we have one here, too) – basically a tap room for an assortment of high quality oils and vinegars. I can’t imagine it lasting a long time (here, at least), but I really hope it does. Anyway, the oil was excellent and is now sitting out on the counter to use! Dinner was spaghetti alla bolognese:
Posted Image

10/31/2012 late dinner after the goblin visits:
Posted Image

Posted Image
Ham, Brussels sprouts, baked beans, mac and cheese and biscuits. Those sprouts are TINY – about the size of a nickel. They were so tender and sweet – the best I’ve had for ages. The biscuits are frozen – Mary B’s – and were a Christmas experiment. I’m changing things up a bit this year and the centerpiece of the buffet will be a platter of Mr. Kim’s smoked ham and a pile of biscuits. These are the small tea biscuits and I wanted to play with them a bit – see if I could bake them ahead of time and heat just at the last minute. They worked very well and I think I’m firm on using them.

11/1/2012 Mr. Kim’s dinner:
Posted Image
Chicken w/ BBQ sauce, baked beans, slaw and a biscuit. Mine:
Posted Image

Posted Image
Chicken macaroni salad, biscuits, beans and a bowl of Momma’s vegetable soup.

#2435 dcarch

dcarch
  • participating member
  • 2,448 posts

Posted 02 November 2012 - 04:48 PM

Good to have you back Kim.

Good to hear things are back to normal.

Good to see you are betting even better in cooking!

dcarch

#2436 Norm Matthews

Norm Matthews
  • participating member
  • 814 posts
  • Location:Kansas City , Kansas

Posted 03 November 2012 - 07:57 AM

Kim, if interested, you might try this shrimp boil. It makes really good shrimp



2 tablespoons rosemary
2 teaspoons dried thyme
1 teaspoon black pepper
5 garlic cloves, peeled and chopped
1 teaspoon celery seeds
1 teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes
2 quarts chicken broth
3 ounces tomato paste
½ cup butter
1 ½ pounds shrimp, peeled, tails on, save shrimp shells.

Combine all the ingredients with the peeled shrimp shells and simmer 30 to 45 minutes, Strain out the shells, return to heat and cook shrimp a few minutes, until just opaque.

#2437 Nicolai

Nicolai
  • participating member
  • 265 posts

Posted 03 November 2012 - 09:59 AM

Dinner tonight, Burrata and Chablis, a marriage made in culinary heaven.
muhamara.com

#2438 patrickamory

patrickamory
  • participating member
  • 1,535 posts
  • Location:New York

Posted 03 November 2012 - 11:29 AM

Hey Prawncrackers, sorry for delayed response on the massmun curries and peanuttiness, and that was not meant to be a loaded question!

I like peanuts in their whole form, and sometimes crumbled. But anything that resembles peanut butter in even the slightest way is something I cannot abide, and sauces and curries incorporating peanuts sometimes get there. (Same goes for peanut oil in some applications, and even sesame pastes for some reason). Crumbled peanuts on top of a curry don't seem to evoke peanut butter usually.

I've had bad experiences with penang and massamun curries in restaurants because of this association in my mind, and was wondering whether homecooked versions have to be like that, and what yours was like specifically. As you know I love Thai cooking and am pretty deep into it, but those are two dishes I haven't attempted for this reason.

#2439 rotuts

rotuts
  • participating member
  • 5,571 posts
  • Location:Boston MA

Posted 03 November 2012 - 11:36 AM

Nicolai


Chablis! Yum and not from the Trader!

Kim: consider microwaving the prepared potatoes a bit (carefully re time) in an enclosed container I do this all the time. if the skin is left on and not cut up I micro wave whole with fork stabbings to release some steam.

cuts down on cook time a lot and does not release potato goodness into the liquid

Edited by rotuts, 03 November 2012 - 11:37 AM.


#2440 ScottyBoy

ScottyBoy
  • society donor
  • 1,254 posts
  • Location:United States

Posted 03 November 2012 - 12:48 PM

Dinner tonight, Burrata and Chablis, a marriage made in culinary heaven.


God I love good Burrata....
Sleep, bike, cook, feed, repeat...
Oakland, CA
My Place
My eGullet Foodblog
eG Ethics Signatory

#2441 rod rock

rod rock
  • participating member
  • 292 posts

Posted 05 November 2012 - 06:58 AM

Buratta is wonderful! Combination of mozzarella and Italian cheese is simply wonderful. I like herb decorations, they always give me more apetite.

"The way you cut your meat reflects the way you live."

 

Franchise Takeaway
 

 


#2442 Rico

Rico
  • participating member
  • 271 posts
  • Location:Dallas

Posted 05 November 2012 - 08:11 AM

I've been doing loads of lazy lurking in lieu of actual participation - for shame, I know, but it's so easy to merely meander through in the food on this thread!

I got a steak-like cut from the chuck the other day from my butcher. Threw it in the SVS for an hour at 141 and seared it before the chimichurri. It was good, but still had a little too much chew; going to try a significantly longer time at a little lower temp next time. The flavor is killer, though. Marinated bell peppers in the back.

Posted Image


Edited because, despite the fact that I have been on egullet for years, I have only just now figured out how to post links to photos. See what I mean about this lazy thing?

Edited by Rico, 05 November 2012 - 08:15 AM.


#2443 munchymom

munchymom
  • participating member
  • 441 posts
  • Location:West Palm Beach, FL

Posted 06 November 2012 - 11:13 AM

Yellow curry with tofu and mixed vegetables, brown rice, and cucumbers in vinegar:
DSCN0230.jpg
"There is nothing like a good tomato sandwich now and then."
-Harriet M. Welsch

Visit my food blog! http://goodformeblog.blogspot.com/

#2444 EnriqueB

EnriqueB
  • participating member
  • 288 posts
  • Location:Madrid, Spain

Posted 06 November 2012 - 11:32 AM

But I do need to single one person out: Enrique, congratulations on the birth of your son! How wonderful for you and I wish you and your family so much happiness!

Many thanks Kim! And I'm sorry for your loss, hope things go better little by little.

#2445 EnriqueB

EnriqueB
  • participating member
  • 288 posts
  • Location:Madrid, Spain

Posted 06 November 2012 - 11:40 AM

Red cabagge gazpacho, from Heston Blumenthal at Home. I didn't love the flavour profile, but it had a pretty color!
gazpacho-de-lombarda.JPG

Veal tongue sous-vide (48 hours at 65ºC), apple, fast-pickled cucumber (from Momofuku), and marcona almonds. Sauce from the reduced bag juices plus créme fraîche. From the Umami Madrid spanish blog: http://www.umami-mad...8-horas/lengua/
lengua-ternera-sv-manzana-pepino-encurtido.JPG

#2446 mm84321

mm84321
  • participating member
  • 769 posts

Posted 06 November 2012 - 03:09 PM

Posted Image
Posted Image
Sole glazed in lobster coral with caviar, champagne and leeks.
Posted Image

#2447 ScottyBoy

ScottyBoy
  • society donor
  • 1,254 posts
  • Location:United States

Posted 06 November 2012 - 03:16 PM

Had you been saving the coral from when you made other lobster dishes or could you buy it straight? I usually blend mine into butter and make blocks for the freezer if I'm using it for that same dish.
Sleep, bike, cook, feed, repeat...
Oakland, CA
My Place
My eGullet Foodblog
eG Ethics Signatory

#2448 mm84321

mm84321
  • participating member
  • 769 posts

Posted 06 November 2012 - 03:29 PM

I bought this. Basically, I did what you do, and blended it with softened butter. Then, you make a stock from the sole bones, reduce to a glaze, mount with a bit of butter, chill, then mix in the coral butter. After the sole is cooked sous vide for 4 minutes, you pat it dry, spread over this mixture, and stick it under the broiler (or salamander, if you have it) and let it color and glaze.

#2449 ScottyBoy

ScottyBoy
  • society donor
  • 1,254 posts
  • Location:United States

Posted 06 November 2012 - 03:35 PM

Oh man, Flavor Town.
Sleep, bike, cook, feed, repeat...
Oakland, CA
My Place
My eGullet Foodblog
eG Ethics Signatory

#2450 David Ross

David Ross
  • host
  • 3,361 posts
  • Location:Spokane

Posted 06 November 2012 - 06:56 PM

Very simple and easy but a very tasty weeknight dinner that didn't take a lot of work. Fried giant prawn. Steamed rice with black sesame seed and sea salt. Store-bought seaweed salad and fermented vegetables, (out of a little can off the shelf at the Asian market). Then a dipping sauce of citrus-flavored soy sauce, fish sauce, sesame oil and julienned ginger.

015.JPG

#2451 Kim Shook

Kim Shook
  • participating member
  • 2,960 posts
  • Location:Richmond, VA

Posted 06 November 2012 - 10:33 PM

dcarch – thanks so much. Things really are getting better – still lots to go through, but I’m feeling so much better about my grandmother and that helps everything.

Norm – thank you – that shrimp boil sounds great! I’ll try that soon.

Enrique – thank you for your good wishes!

Had my mom and sister over for dinner the other night. Didn’t know my sister was in town until lunchtime, so I made an easy pot roast:
Posted Image
Ronald Johnson’s Italian pot roast, egg noodles and more lovely little Brussels sprouts.

#2452 dcarch

dcarch
  • participating member
  • 2,448 posts

Posted 07 November 2012 - 07:35 PM

Kim - Pot roast may be easy for you, but I find it not alway come out the way I like.

David Ross - That fried shrimp dish is not easy either.

mm84321 - ugly fish, beautiful dish.

Rico - nice looking steak, so what it's a little chewy.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Storm after storm here in NY. There was not much to do, everything was shut down, Only boring weather reports and campaign commercials on TV. So I turned off the TV and cooked

dcarch

Salmon can have three textures: Raw as in sushi, fully cooked flaky like canned salmon, then there is Sous vide salmon. Salmon cooked at very low temperature has this amazing tender juicy creamy consistence.
Posted Image
Posted Image
Posted Image




Roasted pork with roasted pepper

Posted Image


Posted Image


Baked ribs with baked cauliflower
Posted Image
Posted Image


Sometimes, just too lazy to fry green tomatoes. Season the slices and pop them in the waffle iron
Posted Image
Posted Image

#2453 mm84321

mm84321
  • participating member
  • 769 posts

Posted 07 November 2012 - 07:57 PM

Salmon is also nice seared, skin side down (without skin), and poached in olive oil at 140ºF for 20 minutes. Gives a very nice texture.
Posted Image

#2454 dcarch

dcarch
  • participating member
  • 2,448 posts

Posted 07 November 2012 - 08:02 PM

Salmon is also nice seared, skin side down (without skin), and poached in olive oil at 140ºF for 20 minutes. Gives a very nice texture.


Actually I have been able to get crispy skin, I mean crackling crispy without over cooking the fish. The salmon was SV at 120F.

dcarch

Edited by dcarch, 07 November 2012 - 08:07 PM.


#2455 mm84321

mm84321
  • participating member
  • 769 posts

Posted 07 November 2012 - 08:12 PM

I will have to try it.

#2456 mm84321

mm84321
  • participating member
  • 769 posts

Posted 08 November 2012 - 03:56 PM

Woodcock from Pennsylvania
Posted Image
Hung for only 2 days
Posted Image
Trussed by sticking the beak through the fat of the thighs. The gizzards, eyes and tongue are all removed.
Posted Image
White cabbage is blanched, seasoned with fleur de sel and pepper, then cooked sous vide with truffle juice for 7 hours.
Posted Image
Posted Image
Posted Image
It is then cut into circles, colored in clarified butter, and deglazed with the cooking juices.
Posted Image
The woodcock is roasted whole, carved, the bones used to make the sauce, the innards removed, chopped and added to a mixture of chopped foie gras and cognac. Bread is sauteed in the cooking fat, and cut in half (melba style), then spread with this mixture and cooked quickly in the oven.
Posted Image
The legs are deboned, and both the breasts and legs are wrapped with cabbage. The sauce is served on the side in a sauceboat.
Posted Image

#2457 pacman1978

pacman1978
  • participating member
  • 59 posts

Posted 08 November 2012 - 04:28 PM

Nicolai - I love love love buratta! I'm from the UK but just got married in Italy and we had it at our wedding. Fantastic just as you served it but even more decadent with some shaved truffle on top!

To those who don't know it, it is a mozzarella that has cream inside and if you're looking for a unique antipasti dish it can be the centrepiece to elevate it!

#2458 patrickamory

patrickamory
  • participating member
  • 1,535 posts
  • Location:New York

Posted 08 November 2012 - 07:25 PM

OMG mm that woodcock. Trussed with the beak!

#2459 Kim Shook

Kim Shook
  • participating member
  • 2,960 posts
  • Location:Richmond, VA

Posted 09 November 2012 - 09:00 AM

dcarch – Your salmon is beautiful. And I’m QUITE sure that you would make a lovely pot roast! I love the waffle ironed green tomatoes!

mm – I’d love to try that woodcock. The entire dish looks and sounds delectable!

Pot roast soup is what all good pot roast wants to be when it’s time comes. When I make that pot roast, I always double up on the sauce ingredients so that I have plenty for soup. Picked apart meat, all the sauce, some of the leftover noodles and a handful of peas make good soup – and what we had for dinner a couple of nights ago:
Posted Image

And Biscoff spread and banana crepes:
Posted Image
I make ugly crepes, but they were very good!

Night before last - pot roast soup again, with a side of cheese, hummus and really good local bread:
Posted Image
Cheeses are Ca De Ambros Taleggio and Soignon goat brie. Both were lovely, but I’m kicking myself that I forgot I had a jar of preserved figs that a friend gave to me. That would have been incredible. Oh, well, back to Whole Foods, I guess!

I also made cranberry sauce for Christmas dinner to put in the freezer.

#2460 EnriqueB

EnriqueB
  • participating member
  • 288 posts
  • Location:Madrid, Spain

Posted 09 November 2012 - 01:32 PM

I guess talking again about the fantastic compositions of dcarch, or the wonderful technique and platings of mm84321 and avaserfi would be repetitive, so I will not insist...

Kim, I could be eating that soup the whole winter!

Sous-Vide Duck day! First, one of the best French foie gras I've ever eaten, cooked sous-vide in torchon style, 57ºC for 45 minutes:
foie-sv-57c_P.JPG

Then leg confit sous-vide, from Modernist Cuisine:
duck-leg-confit-sv.JPG