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Dinner! 2012


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#31 nikkib

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Posted 03 January 2012 - 04:16 AM

Franci - am I right in thinking you are in Monaco or Nice? The salad and fritters scream "riveria chic" at me and are the exact sort of dishes I would be hoping to eat when holidaying in the south of France..
"Experience is something you gain just after you needed it" ....A Wise man

#32 Franci

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Posted 03 January 2012 - 05:47 AM

dcarch, how did you get that beautiful skin on the duck?
Last year I made Szechuanese duck three times at least, deep fried, taste was wonderful but I could never achieve a perfect coloration on the skin.

C. sapidus, I wish my children will turn out as adventurous eaters as yours. So far I cannot even have them eat zhou, jook, and they are half Chinese. Is there a secret?

Here there is a HUGE Filipino population but only a couple Asian (in the British sense) shops which carry some ingredients which "cover" :wacko: all asian cuisines.

Nikkib, yes, I'm on the Riviera, right in Monaco. I'm going to miss some stuff when we leave (my assiette de fruit de mer, foie gras as emergency food in the fridge, my offals, the weather) but this has been the most boring place for me.

#33 ambra

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Posted 03 January 2012 - 06:06 AM

Franci, why is it boring?


Nikkib, I had the most wonderful cod fritters in Nice a couple of months ago.... and fought over them with my 3 year old. Too bad he always won!

#34 dcarch

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Posted 03 January 2012 - 06:33 AM

"dcarch, how did you get that beautiful skin on the duck?
Last year I made Szechuanese duck three times at least, deep fried, taste was wonderful but I could never achieve a perfect coloration on the skin. "

Franci, take the duck to a nice sunny beach to get a nice tan. :biggrin:

OK, if I tell you the secret, promise not to tell anyone here? :cool:

There are two kinds of soy sauces in general, light and dark. Two table spoons of dark soy sauce in the marinate will do the job.

The rest is following Peking duck roasting method to get the skin cracklin crispy.

Including this step, Me blowing up a duck:



Have fun.

dcarch

#35 Paul Bacino

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Posted 03 January 2012 - 06:58 AM

dcarch,

How did you do the Sous vide Rib Roast? Just time and temp ?

Thanks Paul
Its good to have Morels

#36 nikkib

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Posted 03 January 2012 - 07:19 AM

Franci - where are you moving to? Yes, i can imagine you would miss all that!!
"Experience is something you gain just after you needed it" ....A Wise man

#37 C. sapidus

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Posted 03 January 2012 - 08:09 AM

C. sapidus, I wish my children will turn out as adventurous eaters as yours. So far I cannot even have them eat zhou, jook, and they are half Chinese. Is there a secret?

Franci – Thanks! Re secrets: 1) Start with foods that they like, slowly expand their comfort zone, and steer clear of power struggles; 2) If they don’t like something, try to figure out why (texture, a particular ingredient, etc.); 3) Children become much less picky when they are hungry; and 4) When all else fails, add bacon!

It does take time, though. Children often need to try a new food several times before they will enjoy it. Our boys are teenagers, so they have become inured to my cooking. :wink:


Here there is a HUGE Filipino population but only a couple Asian (in the British sense) shops which carry some ingredients which "cover" :wacko: all asian cuisines.

Sounds like our small town (minus the beach :rolleyes: ) – we have one pan-Asian market and one Indian grocery. Availability of Latino and Caribbean ingredients is increasing nicely, though . . .

#38 menuinprogress

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Posted 03 January 2012 - 12:59 PM

Did I just see smoked bay scallop custard up there? Let me check ... yeah, I did.
That just blew my mind, menuinprogress. I'd be interested in hearing a little bit more about how you went about creating it.

It is pretty much the same technique as making a sweet custard - but without sugar. We've been experimenting with different combinations/ratios of eggs, milk, and fish stock for the custard base. They have all been good, but with different textures to the custard depending on the egg to liquid ratio.
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#39 dcarch

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Posted 03 January 2012 - 01:11 PM

dcarch,

How did you do the Sous vide Rib Roast? Just time and temp ?

Thanks Paul


The biggest issue with sous vide a 12 lb rib roast is having a tank that is big enough.

I used a beer cooler. In the bag, nothing special, rosemary, salt, pepper, a little Liquid Smoke, soy sauce, sugar, bacon fat, garlic paste.

I had the temperature set at 130F. I don't remember how long, 8 hours?

After that, I put the whole thing in the freezer for 15 minutes, then I had my pet fire breathing dragon (my torch :biggrin: ) to give it the crust.

dcarch

#40 Franci

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Posted 03 January 2012 - 02:41 PM

Franci, why is it boring?


Monaco is really a village and might be boring or not depending on your lifestyle. At this time of my life I would really prefer the convenience of London.


"dcarch, how did you get that beautiful skin on the duck?
Last year I made Szechuanese duck three times at least, deep fried, taste was wonderful but I could never achieve a perfect coloration on the skin. "

Franci, take the duck to a nice sunny beach to get a nice tan. :biggrin:

OK, if I tell you the secret, promise not to tell anyone here? :cool:

There are two kinds of soy sauces in general, light and dark. Two table spoons of dark soy sauce in the marinate will do the job.

The rest is following Peking duck roasting method to get the skin cracklin crispy.

Including this step, Me blowing up a duck:



Have fun.

dcarch

:laugh:
Yes, indeed, today we had 17 C.

Nice job. I went the Szechanese route with the duck because I don't have a compressor nor a big enough oven. I used dark soy sauce in the final basting before deep frying.
But I used a grill to dry the duck (didn't have a neck or enough skin for hanging :rolleyes:) , so I got those anaesthetic marks, then dusted with flour (as for recipe) which evolved in patches of dark color (in the picture looks worse than it was in reality). Taste still was very good. I'll attempt again soon or later or will go to have duck in NY or China :laugh:
Posted Image
anatra fritta di Francesca Spalluto, su Flickr

Franci - where are you moving to? Yes, i can imagine you would miss all that!!

Not sure. If husband stays with his current job maybe back to London. Or in the States, somewhere we feel comfortable (NY, SF or Philly


C. sapidus, I wish my children will turn out as adventurous eaters as yours. So far I cannot even have them eat zhou, jook, and they are half Chinese. Is there a secret?

Franci – Thanks! Re secrets: 1) Start with foods that they like, slowly expand their comfort zone, and steer clear of power struggles; 2) If they don’t like something, try to figure out why (texture, a particular ingredient, etc.); 3) Children become much less picky when they are hungry; and 4) When all else fails, add bacon!


thanks for the advice. Hopefully they would turn ok. My son for now could dip everything in ketchup (not homemade) or eat carbs.


Tonight we had
Veal heart with dates and preserved lemons very, very nice and to go along, not pictured,a pilaf of rice and chickpeas.
heart dates preserved lemons.JPG

#41 mm84321

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Posted 03 January 2012 - 03:23 PM

So, since Dover sole fillet are quite thin, I stacked them together and then vacuum sealed to create a nice fat piece to roast in butter. Half way through I added some preserved lemon to the pan, and served it with squash, also cooked in butter, and a drizzle of the cooking butter. It was very tasty.

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#42 C. sapidus

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Posted 03 January 2012 - 07:28 PM

. . . Hopefully they would turn ok. My son for now could dip everything in ketchup (not homemade) or eat carbs.

Hah! When our boys were younger, their favorite meal was spaghetti with ketchup. :shock: Your little ones will be fine (and well-traveled!).

mm84321 – looks good!

Garlic-black bean pan-fried mahi mahi, from Dancing Shrimp. Mrs. C picked up the fish while I chopped garlic, ginger, fermented black beans, and cilantro stems. Black soy sauce, sugar, rice wine, black pepper, and cayenne rounded out the flavors. Served over jasmine rice, with our usual side salad of lettuce, cucumbers, tomatoes, and scallions.

Posted Image

#43 Paul Bacino

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Posted 03 January 2012 - 09:08 PM


dcarch,

How did you do the Sous vide Rib Roast? Just time and temp ?

Thanks Paul


The biggest issue with sous vide a 12 lb rib roast is having a tank that is big enough.

I used a beer cooler. In the bag, nothing special, rosemary, salt, pepper, a little Liquid Smoke, soy sauce, sugar, bacon fat, garlic paste.

I had the temperature set at 130F. I don't remember how long, 8 hours?

After that, I put the whole thing in the freezer for 15 minutes, then I had my pet fire breathing dragon (my torch :biggrin: ) to give it the crust.

dcarch

Nice...i didnt think it was that big.dude you ate well...thanks

And im sure slept well that nigbt..:)

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Its good to have Morels

#44 SobaAddict70

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Posted 03 January 2012 - 10:04 PM

As usual, I made too much arroz caldo so now I have leftovers. At least it improves with age.

Had a side of this tonight:

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Sautéed watercress, with crispy fried breadcrumbs

#45 rarerollingobject

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Posted 04 January 2012 - 12:57 AM

New Year's Eve dinner was grilled beef, a bit of a tradition in our little circle. Here's some photos.


Dakki, that MEAT! It's meat-henge. And I'm with you..medium rare, or rare. Anything else is sacrilege to the beast IMO.

Franci, lovely fritters. I don't think I've ever had salt cod, but I'm sure I'd like them..salty, crispy, deep-fried..yep.

dcarch, what are the things on the plate with the mussels? Sensational meal.

mm83421, what kind of squash is that? I don't think we have any vegetable that shape in Australia (the ridges, I mean..I realise they're slices) so I'm quite perplexed!

And C. Sapidus..what happened to the eternal cucumbers? :wink:

I'd become concerned that our diets were beginning to lack in pure pork fat lately, so made bossam; a Korean dish of poached sliced pork belly, kimchi, ssamjang (a sauce made by mixing doenjang soybean paste and gochujang chilli paste) and oysters.

Wrap a bit of meat, a dab of sauce, an oyster and a slice of kimchi up in a leaf of butter lettuce and gobble down. Also added slivers of raw garlic to each parcel halfway through the meal, so no photo of that.

Pork fat levels: restored.

2012-01-04 at 18.27.26.jpg

2012-01-04 at 18.29.58.jpg

Edited by rarerollingobject, 04 January 2012 - 12:58 AM.


#46 pastameshugana

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Posted 04 January 2012 - 08:38 AM

Wrap a bit of meat, a dab of sauce, an oyster and a slice of kimchi up in a leaf of butter lettuce and gobble down. Also added slivers of raw garlic to each parcel halfway through the meal, so no photo of that.


That is amazing. And I'm glad to hear your pork fat levels are back up to normal. Wouldn't want you wasting away...
PastaMeshugana
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#47 mm84321

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Posted 04 January 2012 - 10:42 AM

mm83421, what kind of squash is that? I don't think we have any vegetable that shape in Australia (the ridges, I mean..I realise they're slices) so I'm quite perplexed!


It's acorn squash.

#48 rotuts

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Posted 04 January 2012 - 10:45 AM

My dinners never approach what these look like, with a rare exception. But Id like to thank those who contribute, esp. the pics as I find it inspirational.


:smile:

#49 dcarch

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Posted 04 January 2012 - 11:43 AM

"---dcarch, what are the things on the plate with the mussels? Sensational meal.------"

Thanks rarerollingobject.

It is a very healthy vegetable which you may be unfamiliar with, Brassica Rapa Chinensis

(otherwise known as Bok Choi, LOL!)

After I sautéed the beets, I stir fried the bok choi in some of the beet juice, and that’s the way they came out.

dcarch

#50 patrickamory

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Posted 04 January 2012 - 09:21 PM

C. sapidus, what was the recipe for the Malaccan beef and vegetable stew? That looks DELICIOUS.

SobaAddict70, thanks for the Arroz Caldo link - I'm definitely giving that a try! We have lots of high-quality saffron in the house that we need to use too.

#51 rarerollingobject

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Posted 05 January 2012 - 12:42 AM

Laksa tonight, made even tastier with homemade prawn stock to bolster an already very good laksa paste (Tean's brand).

With the component parts of noodles, sliced fish cakes, fried tofu puffs, bean sprouts, blanched squid, fried onions and garlic, coriander, and a spoonful of Malaysian crispy prawn sambal.

2012-01-05 at 18.11.51.jpg

With soup added.

2012-01-05 at 18.13.40.jpg

#52 nikkib

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Posted 05 January 2012 - 12:57 AM

Yum!
"Experience is something you gain just after you needed it" ....A Wise man

#53 mm84321

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Posted 05 January 2012 - 04:59 PM

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Posted Image
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Chestnut Velouté with Foie Gras, Bacon and Celery Root.
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Salsify with Veal Jus and Chervil.
Posted Image

Edited by mm84321, 05 January 2012 - 05:06 PM.


#54 C. sapidus

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Posted 05 January 2012 - 06:05 PM

And C. Sapidus..what happened to the eternal cucumbers? :wink:

Da boyz have become fans of salad, but I usually throw in some cukes for old times' sake.

Speaking of pork fat, tonight younger son baked a pound of bacon with maple syrup. It didn't last long.

C. sapidus, what was the recipe for the Malaccan beef and vegetable stew? That looks DELICIOUS.

Thank you, Patrick. The recipe is from James Oseland's Cradle of Flavor, a book that I can recommend unreservedly. An adaptation of the recipe can be found here (clicky). Send me a PM if you would like more info.

#55 SobaAddict70

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Posted 06 January 2012 - 01:12 AM

Yum!



oh yes

I think I shall go to Sripraphai this weekend so I can satisfy my laska craving :wub: thanks to RRO...

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Warm chicory salad, with shallots, Kalamata olives and blood orange

Sushi
Green tea with honey and ginseng
Mochi stuffed with red bean ice cream

#56 Shelby

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Posted 06 January 2012 - 08:48 AM

I'd give my right arm for some sushi.

#57 Paul Bacino

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Posted 06 January 2012 - 11:50 AM

How Bout a Lunch Shot

" Chicken Fajitas "



Posted Image
Its good to have Morels

#58 Franci

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Posted 06 January 2012 - 02:27 PM

I heard about this dish but never tried it, so, the other day, when I was at Carrefour and I saw "pieds et paquets" I could restrain myself


pieds et paquets 1.JPG

I love offals in general but I don't eat tripe. I said to myself, maybe it's the way my mom cooks it that I don't like, I need to give to it another chance.
The pieds and paquets cooked in the oven for 6 hours with lardons fume, onion, garlic, tomatoes, carrots, bay leaf, quattre epice and a whole bottle of white wine

pieds et paquets 2.JPG

I'm glad I had a plan B: calf's liver! Maybe if I ordered from my butcher the quality would have been much better.
The lambs trotter where actually very tender and delicious but everything got spoiled by the paquets, even the sauce that I was planning to eat with steamed potatoes. My husband declared he likes the Chinese way, no smell, no taste pure textural experience. Oh, well, we cannot like everything. Good that I have sweetbreads soaking :rolleyes:

Edited by Franci, 06 January 2012 - 02:30 PM.


#59 heidih

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Posted 06 January 2012 - 03:00 PM

Franci - you might enjoy some other eGulleters adventures with pigs feet and tripe here. Apparently the opinions varied. You are a brave cook.

#60 rarerollingobject

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Posted 06 January 2012 - 08:02 PM

mm84321, I'm so jealous you can get salsify! I've only ever seen it once here, bought the whole stock, and promptly massacred it with fritters so leaden and chewy they could have been used as doorstops. :sad:

Lovely salad, Soba. Just the sort of salad I love, with THINGS in it.

And Franci, you are indeed a brave cook! Pig trotters I love, but never thought of eating lamb's trotters..wow.

Dinner here was all a bit twee English summer; a salad of greens and nasturtiums, dressed with shallot/honey/Dijon mustard/walnut oil, a pan fried trout (OK, left most of the skin in the pan..cook's treat) and a good old Pimms and ginger ale.

trout.jpg