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The Iced Tea Topic 2012


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37 replies to this topic

#31 Tony Boulton

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Posted 24 August 2012 - 11:07 AM

Aahh... the 60's! Those were the days. I would probably have held the same view about iced tea myself back then.

Even 10 years ago, I remember having lunch with a business asociate in Chicago and my choice of iced tea (on a warm Chicago day, I might add) was treated with some curiosity. Since then it seems to have become much more popular. So many good things have come from the South!

More on topic, I discovered this week that Tazo have taken out the citrus flavor from their black iced tea. I dare not break that to my wife, who despite her being the ultimate afficiando (in my eyes) has not noticed. It still tastes good to me though. But how would I know? I am just a Brit. ;-)

#32 Jaymes

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Posted 24 August 2012 - 12:59 PM

Also perhaps "more on topic," my "comadre" seems to think everyone needs an iced-tea maker and she keeps saying she's going to buy me one. I've never been much for gadgets in general, and I feel like it's a little late in my personal game to suddenly require a new one for which I never previously have felt even the slightest need.

Anybody have an iced-tea maker? If you do, do you use it? Does it justify the space it occupies when it's not in use?

"KNOWLEDGE TENDS TO ELEVATE THE HORSES" - cdh


#33 Wholemeal Crank

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Posted 24 August 2012 - 07:05 PM

I'd had no idea someone made such a device. It's so easy to prepare a bit of hot tea and chill it, and even easier to just take some tea and drop it into cool water and wait....

#34 Jaymes

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Posted 25 August 2012 - 10:14 AM

I'd had no idea someone made such a device. .


Neither did I. But she sure loves hers. The thing is big and cumbersome, but she has it out on her counter at all times. And after I was introduced to hers, I did a bit of googling, and it turns out several companies make them, so someone must be buying them.

I'm more of a "sun tea" gal myself, and really love the look of that sparkling amber liquid brewing in its big gallon glass jar out in the sunshine, but I do appreciate the large pitcher that comes with her iced-tea maker.

And god knows it's quicker. You put ice in that big pitcher, add your tea and water to the machine, select a strength, push a button, and ten minutes later, Bob's your uncle.

http://www.amazon.co...c/dp/B00008VSCO


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Edited by Jaymes, 25 August 2012 - 10:36 AM.

"KNOWLEDGE TENDS TO ELEVATE THE HORSES" - cdh


#35 Tony Boulton

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Posted 25 August 2012 - 11:07 AM

And god knows it's quicker. You put ice in that big pitcher, add your tea and water to the machine, select a strength, push a button, and ten minutes later, Bob's your uncle.


The iced tea maker was declared to be obsolete on these shores when we discovered the cordless electric kettle. And there is yet another great invention to come from the Mother Country. Even in Texas in August it is faster than Sun Tea.

#36 Jaymes

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Posted 25 August 2012 - 11:47 AM


And god knows it's quicker. You put ice in that big pitcher, add your tea and water to the machine, select a strength, push a button, and ten minutes later, Bob's your uncle.


The iced tea maker was declared to be obsolete on these shores when we discovered the cordless electric kettle. And there is yet another great invention to come from the Mother Country. Even in Texas in August it is faster than Sun Tea.


Oh, I know Sun Tea is hopelessly inefficient. And, truth to tell, I don't think it tastes much better, either, if at all.

But I just like looking at it.

Not only is it beautiful, it reminds me of the days in the US south when a big jar of sun tea out on the front verandah was a sort of a signal of hospitality within. Often that would be the first thing that greeted you when you had been invited to some sort of ladies social "do" - a coffee or brunch or book club or bridge luncheon or something.

As you probably know, the pineapple was a symbol of hospitality in the olden days. When the seafaring men sailed home from tropical locales, they often brought with them an assortment of fruit. The hostess of the house would set a pineapple out on the front porch to let all of the neighbors and friends know that her hubby was home from the sea, and that there would be excellent hospitality to be had within, most likely including a taste of sweet, exotic fruit.

I always saw a big jar of sun tea brewing on someone's front porch as being much the same.


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Edited by Jaymes, 25 August 2012 - 11:50 AM.

"KNOWLEDGE TENDS TO ELEVATE THE HORSES" - cdh


#37 heidih

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Posted 26 August 2012 - 08:14 AM

I made an enjoyable pitcher yesterday with a loose jasmine tea. The light floral taste and smell along with the almost natural hint of sweetness was refreshing after a vigorous gardening session.

#38 heidih

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Posted 12 September 2012 - 07:08 PM

It has been not only hot but also humid - unusual for Los Angeles. I took a stab at something along the lines of the Tazo passion tea mentioned earlier. It was refreshing, had enough spice to be interesting, and was a hit with the neighbors. For a pitcher I steeped a handful of jamaica (hibiscus) along with a roughly pounded mix of 1/4 canella stick, about 8 mixed color peppercorns, and a star anise for 10 minutes. This has been repeated and jars of the mix gifted.