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Commercial mayonnaise – likes, dislikes?

Condiments

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70 replies to this topic

#1 JAZ

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Posted 24 May 2012 - 02:01 PM

In this topic on sweet potato salad, Jaymes said (about mayonnaise):

Regardless, in the US south, most good cooks that I know use Duke's anyway. If you live in a region where it's sold, and you haven't tried it, you should.


I have to disagree: while some cooks here in Atlanta use it, most that I know prefer Hellman's. I certainly do. Duke's is oddly sweet -- halfway to Miracle Whip, in my opinion -- and I can pick it out immediately in things like tuna or potato salad when it's used. If I were faced with the choice of Duke's or nothing on a sandwich, I think I'd have to choose the latter.

Am I missing something? Do people really like Duke's? Are there other brands worth trying?

#2 Chris Hennes

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Posted 24 May 2012 - 02:16 PM

Another vote for Hellman's here.

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#3 Joe Blowe

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Posted 24 May 2012 - 02:18 PM

I'm a fourth generation Best Foods/Hellman's customer, and still believe it's the gold standard. I find Miracle Whip to be absolutely repugnant. Duke's sounds like repugnant-lite :laugh:

For the past year, I've been buying Kirkland mayo -- word on the street is that it's probably made by Bestfoods Corp., and I must confess it's pretty hard to tell the difference.

If it's a holiday occasion I wouldn't dare put out Kirkland mayo; the family has enough ammo on me already...
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So I got that goin' for me, which is nice.

#4 Jaymes

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Posted 24 May 2012 - 02:51 PM

In this topic on sweet potato salad, Jaymes said (about mayonnaise):

Regardless, in the US south, most good cooks that I know use Duke's anyway. If you live in a region where it's sold, and you haven't tried it, you should.


I have to disagree: while some cooks here in Atlanta use it, most that I know prefer Hellman's. I certainly do. Duke's is oddly sweet -- halfway to Miracle Whip, in my opinion -- and I can pick it out immediately in things like tuna or potato salad when it's used. If I were faced with the choice of Duke's or nothing on a sandwich, I think I'd have to choose the latter.

Am I missing something? Do people really like Duke's? Are there other brands worth trying?


Well, you can say that you don't like Duke's, don't use it, and don't know anyone that does (although if you're "picking it out...in tuna or potato salad," someone that you know must be using it).

But regardless as to whether or not you like it, I don't think you can "disagree" with MY statement, which was, that "in the US south, most good cooks that I know use Duke's."

Which is a statement of fact.

Utterly indisputable.

Unless you and I know all the exact same people.

I don't know how deep your southern roots go (maybe you just have Yankee taste buds :biggrin: ), but I come from a long line of good southern cooks, including my grandmother, who was a legendary southern cook, and who owned a locally-famous home-cooking restaurant, and my sister, who has lived in Atlanta for some four decades. I have friends and relatives all over the south, and I myself have lived in various locations throughout the south for many years.

I didn't say that absolutely everybody in the south prefers Duke's. That would be silly. Of course, there are always going to be personal likes and dislikes.

But I will repeat what I did say: "In the US south, most good cooks that I know use Duke's anyway."

And they do.



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Edited by Jaymes, 24 May 2012 - 03:49 PM.


#5 munchymom

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Posted 24 May 2012 - 04:47 PM

I'm not a big mayo consumer, but when I use mayo, it's Duke's. I don't find it too sweet at all. (This does not apply to the "lite" version, which contains sugar and is way too sweet. Bad mistake buying that one.)
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#6 Kim Shook

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Posted 24 May 2012 - 04:50 PM

Dukes here. But I'm not all that discerning - I'm quite sure that I couldn't pick out a particular brand in a blind taste test. I like Miracle Whip, too - with certain things.

#7 tikidoc

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Posted 24 May 2012 - 05:44 PM

Hellman's here, when I don't make my own. I also find Duke's too sweet. I consider Miracle Whip to be inedible, for the same reason, x10. I live in the south, and have since 1994, but I'm not from the south.

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#8 Margaret Pilgrim

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Posted 24 May 2012 - 05:50 PM

It's all about what you call store-bought mayonnaise. For me, it's Best Foods/Hellsmans. Kraft et al don't make it. Anything sweet is wrong to my taste.

I need to buy a jar of Kewpie, which is preferred by many cooks and self-proclaimed foodies. Made in Japan. i wonder if these same people realize it contains MSG.
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#9 chezcherie

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Posted 24 May 2012 - 06:25 PM

best foods. the best best foods, in my opinion, is a variety found at latin markets, with an orange top. made with lime juice. (i know--the orange top is confusing. but they chose green for the olive oil variety.) i buy the biggest canisters they have, and i buy 3 at a time. i don't use a lot of mayonnaise, but it's always that slightly tangy, bright-flavored lime best foods when i do.
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#10 Shel_B

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Posted 24 May 2012 - 06:44 PM

best foods ... a variety found at latin markets, with an orange top. made with lime juice.
http://www.bestfoods...naise-with-lime


Oooo, that sounds very interesting. Will have to give it a try.

Ilike TJ's regular, plain ol' mayo ... it's got anice, eggy taste that goes very well with the things I use mayo for. And the price is right.

.... Shel


#11 Lisa Shock

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Posted 24 May 2012 - 07:30 PM

I grew up in a household of mayo-haters. Sandwiches got mustard and maybe horseradish on them.

Once I discovered Miracle Whip, I loved it. I found regular mayo to be rather flavorless -and still do.

I started making my own at home and haven't really looked back. I usually have a jar of dill lime and a jar of ginger sesame in the fridge at all times. Other flavors come and go based on dishes I am making. If I eat out I won't go out of my way to ask for mayo, but I won't reject it either.

Along the road of discovering mayonnaise flavors, I found an imitation miracle whip recipe online. While it doesn't taste exactly like the real thing, when I did my initial taste-test with friends, everyone noticed that after tasting the from-scratch stuff, the brand-name stuff in the jar tasted very mettalic and chemical. So, I make that recipe too, on occasion.

Never had Duke's, to my knowledge, so, no opinion on that.

For commercial food prep, Hellman's is really consistently best. It behaves itself nicely and is always the same, jar after jar, tub after tub. Once tried a Sysco product labelled 'heavy duty' -it was oddly super-thick and sticky.

#12 judiu

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Posted 24 May 2012 - 08:49 PM

best foods. the best best foods, in my opinion, is a variety found at latin markets, with an orange top. made with lime juice. (i know--the orange top is confusing. but they chose green for the olive oil variety.) i buy the biggest canisters they have, and i buy 3 at a time. i don't use a lot of mayonnaise, but it's always that slightly tangy, bright-flavored lime best foods when i do.
http://www.bestfoods...naise-with-lime

AHA! I have used Hellman's all my life, along with sour cream in most salads like potato and maccaroni (actually, the s.c. is my secret weapon in same... :laugh: ), but I had tried, and liked Kraft Limon (with lime juice), but now I HAVE to try this Helman's! I live in south Florida so bodegas are pretty easy to find. Have to check it out! :rolleyes:
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#13 Pierogi

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Posted 24 May 2012 - 10:37 PM

Best Foods and Best Foods only. The original, although the one with lime sounds interesting. The Best Foods with olive oil is gross. The TJs mayo is one of the few Trader Joe private-labeled products I *don't* love. We don't have Duke's out here, so I've never tried it. I, too, would like to lay my hands on some Kewpie just to experience it. But me and Best Foods, we go way back. I've been known to just stick a spoon in the jar, and well, never mind......

But my homemade is much, much, MUCH better.
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#14 Marya

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Posted 24 May 2012 - 11:44 PM

Since I use so very little mayonnaise, homemade and Kewpie are my choices; the former for the obligatory salads for barbecue, and the latter because it is utterly unique, and delicious. Yes, it does have a little MSG (see link), but it also has a more pronounced mustard-egg yolk flavor. And I have to admit, the plastic container is pretty cool to the touch.
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Edited to add link

Edited by Marya, 24 May 2012 - 11:48 PM.


#15 Meanderer

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Posted 25 May 2012 - 04:04 AM

There must be some good cooks in the south who use Mrs. Filbert's mayonaise. After all, the jar says it is "made with southern pride."

#16 SylviaLovegren

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Posted 25 May 2012 - 06:13 AM

My experience with southern cooks is that they also put chopped sweet pickle (one Georgia woman I know called them "salad chunks") in mayo-based salads, so God knows what they use for mayo. :rolleyes:

#17 Shel_B

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Posted 25 May 2012 - 06:21 AM

Best Foods and Best Foods only [...] The TJs mayo is one of the few Trader Joe private-labeled products I *don't* love. [...] But my homemade is much, much, MUCH better.


Last night I did a taste test of the Best Foods and the TJ's mayo. I found the Best Foods to be rather bland and "greasy" tasting compared to what I'd describe as TJ's "lively" and fresher taste.

However, the Best Foods came in a small, plastic squeeze container, and I've heard some people mention that it doesn't taste quite the same as that which comes in the glass jar. Any comments from Best Foods/Hellman's folks about that?

A friend of mine preferred Kraft mayo ... any Kraft fans here? What do you like about it?

I agree about home made ...

Edited by Shel_B, 25 May 2012 - 06:23 AM.

.... Shel


#18 Panaderia Canadiense

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Posted 25 May 2012 - 06:28 AM

I'm almost reluctant to weigh in, given where I'm situated....

My favourite commercial mayo is called Alacena, and it's a lime with a hint of mustard and spices concoction, but nowhere near as strong as Duke's. After that comes Gustadina, which is lemon with no spices and is similar to the Hellman's sold in Canada. Both are tangy.

ETA - I'll also say that I can't find any mayo of any sort in glass jars. They come in recyclable skuisi packs, which are infinitely conveniente and don't seem to affect flavour in any discernable manner.

Miracle Whip and Kraft Mayo are wrongness in a jar. Period. Same goes for any other sweet sandwich sauce trying to pass itself off as mayo.

And hands down, of course, is home-made.

Edited by Panaderia Canadiense, 25 May 2012 - 06:31 AM.

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#19 Shel_B

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Posted 25 May 2012 - 06:50 AM

"The Great Mayonnaise Taste Test" ...

http://blogs.ajc.com...ise-taste-test/

Edited by Shel_B, 25 May 2012 - 06:51 AM.

.... Shel


#20 Crouton

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Posted 25 May 2012 - 07:03 AM

I was born and raised in Tennessee and now residing in Alabama and I didn't know Duke's existed until I saw a write-up for it in Garden & Gun magazine as being a "southern staple"... I just assumed it was a Carolina micro-regional Southern thing, hence why I had never heard of it. In my house, we always have 2 large Costco jars of Hellmann's. Anything else and I'll pass...

#21 Charcuterer

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Posted 25 May 2012 - 07:32 AM

At my house it is either Dukes or Hellman's depending on which is cheaper. I love dukes in cole slaw and deviled eggs but for a sandwich I prefer Hellman's.

#22 JAZ

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Posted 25 May 2012 - 08:30 AM

Last night I did a taste test of the Best Foods and the TJ's mayo. I found the Best Foods to be rather bland and "greasy" tasting compared to what I'd describe as TJ's "lively" and fresher taste.

However, the Best Foods came in a small, plastic squeeze container, and I've heard some people mention that it doesn't taste quite the same as that which comes in the glass jar. Any comments from Best Foods/Hellman's folks about that?

A friend of mine preferred Kraft mayo ... any Kraft fans here? What do you like about it?


The Hellman's/Best Foods in the squeeze bottle is definitely different, at least in texture; it's smoother and a little thinner. I much prefer the Hellman's jar to the squeeze bottle for that reason. I've never tasted them side by side, so I'm not sure how they compare on that front.

Kraft, as I recall, has the same eerily smooth texture as Hellman's in the squeeze bottle. I'm not a fan, but I still prefer it to Duke's.

#23 Toliver

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Posted 25 May 2012 - 09:39 AM

Miracle Whip is not mayo and has never pretended to be mayo. I think because it's white and spreadable, hence mayo-like, people assume it's mayo...but it's not.
That being said, my family had only Miracle Whip when I was growing up and I didn't discover mayo until I was an adult. I like both, which may be heresy to some. My mom's potato salad and deviled eggs wouldn't taste the same without using Mircale Whip in them.
Mayo has always been Best Foods brand for me because I'm west of the Mississippi. It's not big on flavor but I think adds a nice subtle umami note to sandwiches and such.

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#24 ScoopKW

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Posted 25 May 2012 - 01:01 PM

I have tried every mayo listed on this thread with the exception of Alacena. I have even tried McCormick's Mayonesa, which is very popular with Las Vegas Mexican-Americans. There is simply no substitute for eggs collected from your hens in the back yard, and oil selected for the mayo task at hand -- I use olive oil for aioli and canola for more "traditional" mayo applications.

If we lived in a world without blenders, I could see the store-bought thing. But this is just too easy to make at home.
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#25 MelissaH

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Posted 25 May 2012 - 01:45 PM

I think the best mayo or mayo-like substance is the one you grew up with. In my house, it's Hellmann's and Hellmann's only, for forever. (My husband differs, but I think he's starting to come around, finally.)

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#26 Chris Hennes

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Posted 25 May 2012 - 01:46 PM

There is simply no substitute for eggs collected from your hens in the back yard, and oil selected for the mayo task at hand -- I use olive oil for aioli and canola for more "traditional" mayo applications.

Please. There is a substitute, it's called Hellman's. Completely reasonable for about 90% of my uses of mayo. And since my backyard has a disturbing lack of hens in it, I am forced to make even homemade mayonnaise from either store-bought or friend-provided eggs, but I gotta say it still tastes pretty good.

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#27 Darienne

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Posted 25 May 2012 - 02:02 PM

I was raised on Miracle Whip and never tasted mayonnaise until I was married. But then I was also raised on Heinz Chili Sauce and never had ketchup either. My Mother hated cooking. Period. So did I until about 4 years ago.

Live with a Mayonnaise DH, but I'm not really enchanted with the entire Miracle Whip/mayonnaise thingy anyhow. Much prefer olive oil/lemon juice for dressings.
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#28 Margaret Pilgrim

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Posted 25 May 2012 - 02:58 PM

If we lived in a world without blenders, I could see the store-bought thing. But this is just too easy to make at home.


If you use one of these "French working jars" and a conical wisk, mayonnaise is stupid-easy.

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#29 heidih

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Posted 25 May 2012 - 03:15 PM

I grew up in a household that did not use mayo as they were unfamiliar with it. Miracle Whip showed up for one or two recipes from a cooking class my mom took so I used that on my tomato sandwiches during my Harriet the Spy phase. I never really thought much about it until I started growing tomatoes and began to make tomato sandwiches my main meal during the season. I went through a phase with the Kraft Limon when it showed up on sale everywhere one summer. I think I liked the idea more than the product. My current mayo is Trader Joe's Organic not because I insist on organic but because I picked it up one day when I needed mayo, was at that store, and did not want to buy their regular which is a big jar. I liked it and have continued to buy it.

#30 Chris Hennes

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Posted 25 May 2012 - 03:29 PM

If we lived in a world without blenders, I could see the store-bought thing. But this is just too easy to make at home.

If you use one of these "French working jars" and a conical wisk, mayonnaise is stupid-easy.

Ease isn't the only question: certainly, it's easy. But I have yet to come up with a way of making two tablespoons of mayo, so I wind up throwing away a good cup of the stuff every time I make it, because I just don't use that much. Except in the summer during tomato season, or when I go on a fried egg sandwich kick for a week, I just can't justify making the stuff, when Hellman's is almost as good.

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