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Making mozzarella @ home

Italian

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#91 jsmeeker

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Posted 20 May 2012 - 03:01 PM

The website for the Local Milk product has one more specific comment about pasteurization, buried in a different FAQ answer:

"What’s the difference between your milk and organic milk?
The biggest difference between our milk and any other milk is that it’s fresher and tastes better. Most organic milk has a 60-day shelf life because it’s ultra-pasteurized, while our milk has 17-day pasteurization. Organic milk is more about the farmer’s agricultural practices and how the herd is fed than the purity or quality of the milk. In terms of the use of antibiotics, we believe that when a cow gets sick, you should remove it from the milking herd and treat it, and once it’s healthy and the antibiotics have been washed out of its system, return it to the herd. Organic farmers don’t have this option and must remove the cow completely. If they choose to treat the cow, they can’t return it to the herd."


Interesting. My google searches for low temperature milk pasteurization gets lots of hits. When I get one for a dairy, they all seem to specifically say their milk is low temperature pasteurized and give the specific temp and time. I wonder what Local is really doing. Bases on limited research, I would say if they were really doing low temp pasteurization, they would actually tout by directly mentioning it.

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#92 Fat Guy

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Posted 20 May 2012 - 04:37 PM

I've made an inquiry. We'll see if they answer (the Farmland people didn't).

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#93 Fat Guy

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Posted 20 May 2012 - 07:38 PM

Here's the scene at the science fair:

P1040013.JPG

Steven A. Shaw aka "Fat Guy"
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#94 Shelby

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Posted 21 May 2012 - 01:24 AM

Very cool. Out shines the volcano I made using baking soda and vinegar by far :)

#95 slkinsey

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Posted 21 May 2012 - 03:58 PM

21 CFR § 1240.61 Mandatory pasteurization for all milk and milk products in final package form intended for direct human consumption.

(a) No person shall cause to be delivered into interstate commerce or shall sell, otherwise distribute, or hold for sale or other distribution after shipment in interstate commerce any milk or milk product in final package form for direct human consumption unless the product has been pasteurized or is made from dairy ingredients (milk or milk products) that have all been pasteurized, except where alternative procedures to pasteurization are provided for by regulation, such as in part 133 of this chapter for curing of certain cheese varieties.


(b) Except as provided in paragraphs ( c ) and (d) of this section, the terms "pasteurization," "pasteurized," and similar terms shall mean the process of heating every particle of milk and milk product in properly designed and operated equipment to one of the temperatures given in the following table and held continuously at or above that temperature for at least the corresponding specified time:


145 deg. F (63 deg. C) for 30 minutes;
161 deg. F (72 deg. C) for 15 seconds;
191 deg. F (89 deg. C) for 1 second;
194 deg. F (90 deg. C) for 0.5 second;
201 deg. F (94 deg. C) for 0.1 second;
204 deg. F (96 deg. C) for 0.05 second; or
212 deg. F (100 deg. C) for 0.01 second.

( c ) Eggnog shall be heated to at least the following temperature and time specification:


155 deg. F (69 deg. C) for 30 minutes;
175 deg. F (80 deg. C) for 25 seconds; or
180 deg. F (83 deg. C) for 15 seconds.

(d) Neither paragraph (b) nor ( c ) of this section shall be construed as barring any other pasteurization process that has been recognized by the Food and Drug Administration to be equally efficient in the destruction of microbial organisms of public health significance.


UHT processing is technically not pasteurization, and is 275 deg. F (135 deg. C) for 2 seconds, plus some special filtration and aseptic packaging. Most "low temperature pasteurized" milk is treated at 161 deg. F (72 deg. C) for 15 seconds. The 30 minute treatment at 145 deg. F (63 deg. C) is for batch, rather than continuous processing.
Samuel Lloyd Kinsey

#96 Fat Guy

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Posted 22 May 2012 - 07:33 AM

The Local Milk people emailed back to say they do 165F for 18 seconds.

I think in addition to using a lower temperature than some others, their product is just better. I get more, better-tasting curds from a gallon of their milk than from any other I tried. Most others wouldn't coagulate enough to form a mass of cheese. The ones that would didn't develop proper texture. That's quite aside from flavor and yield.

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#97 andiesenji

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Posted 22 May 2012 - 10:11 AM

I have an automatic electric pasteurizer (2 gallon) which I used when I was able to buy raw milk. It raised the temp of the milk to 145°F. and held it at that temp for 35 minutes. It has an "agitator" that slowly stirs the milk. The whole process took fifty minutes. The heating coils are around the sides as well as in the bottom so the milk is heated evenly but the agitator is to make doubly sure.

I bought mine many years ago from Sears "farm supply" catalog. Lehman's sold the same one until just a few years ago but I haven't seen one for ages, except occasionally on ebay and they are pretty beat up.

pasturizer.jpg

Edited by andiesenji, 22 May 2012 - 10:33 AM.

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#98 pkeibel

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Posted 22 May 2012 - 01:00 PM

Not every milk works. Check here for details and which producers do work the best http://www.cheesemak...g-and-Milk.html. I found it works best to use raw milk

#99 Shalmanese

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Posted 22 May 2012 - 01:32 PM

I have an automatic electric pasteurizer (2 gallon) which I used when I was able to buy raw milk. It raised the temp of the milk to 145°F. and held it at that temp for 35 minutes. It has an "agitator" that slowly stirs the milk. The whole process took fifty minutes. The heating coils are around the sides as well as in the bottom so the milk is heated evenly but the agitator is to make doubly sure.


Have you ever tried using it for sous vide?
PS: I am a guy.

#100 andiesenji

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Posted 22 May 2012 - 02:54 PM


I have an automatic electric pasteurizer (2 gallon) which I used when I was able to buy raw milk. It raised the temp of the milk to 145°F. and held it at that temp for 35 minutes. It has an "agitator" that slowly stirs the milk. The whole process took fifty minutes. The heating coils are around the sides as well as in the bottom so the milk is heated evenly but the agitator is to make doubly sure.


Have you ever tried using it for sous vide?


No. I've been served a few sous vide dishes and really didn't care for any of them. Perhaps it was the texture or something in my head that just didn't equate the food with my preferences.
"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett
My blog:Books,Cooks,Gadgets&Gardening





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