Jump to content


Welcome to the eG Forums!

These forums are a service of the Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, a 501c3 nonprofit organization dedicated to advancement of the culinary arts. Anyone can read the forums, however if you would like to participate in active discussions please join the Society.

Photo

REPORT: 2012 Candy and Confection Conference

Confections Report

  • Please log in to reply
134 replies to this topic

#61 tikidoc

tikidoc
  • participating member
  • 357 posts
  • Location:Richmond, VA

Posted 21 March 2012 - 04:21 AM

I'd love it if we could post recipes from the conference, as a reference. There were lots of things that I tasted and would love to make, but since I could not be in two places at once, I didn't get the recipes. And there were some great fillings that people came up with on the spot, like the raspberry caramel and Bob's whiskey ganache. I'd also love to be able to recreate the blueberry ganache (Chris) and the lemon curd ganache (Kerry).

I checked with site admin as to if I should start a new thread or post here, and was told to post here.

So, I'll start. I brought an apple pie caramel with me that seemed well received, and a couple people asked for the recipe. This is fairly soft at room temp (dipable), but not runny, so adjust as needed to get the texture you want. I'm still figuring out how to do that. I assume I would decrease the final temp if I wanted to use it as a filling that could be piped when cool?

Chocoera suggested that this, with graham crackers, dipped in milk chocolate, would be yummy. I'm thinking maybe with shortbread and chocolate.

½ cup apple cider jelly*
¾ cup heavy cream
5 tablespoons unsalted butter
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
1 teaspoon cinnamon
1 teaspoon fleur de sel or kosher salt
1 ½ cups sugar
¼ cup light corn syrup
¼ cup water

Combine jelly, cream, butter, vanilla, cinnamon and salt and heat until jelly melts most of the way.

Combine sugar, corn syrup, water and sugar and heat until it begins to caramelize.

Add the cream mixture to the sugar, stir and heat to 248F. Pour.

*http://woodscidermill.com/PRODUCTS/CiderJelly.html, this is just cider boiled until it turns into a jelly. I love this stuff on lots of things, like toast, or in a marinade for pork.

So, anyone else?

Jess

#62 lebowits

lebowits
  • participating member
  • 554 posts
  • Location:Olney, MD

Posted 21 March 2012 - 04:42 AM

I'd love it if we could post recipes from the conference, as a reference. There were lots of things that I tasted and would love to make, but since I could not be in two places at once, I didn't get the recipes. And there were some great fillings that people came up with on the spot, like the raspberry caramel and Bob's whiskey ganache. I'd also love to be able to recreate the blueberry ganache (Chris) and the lemon curd ganache (Kerry).

I checked with site admin as to if I should start a new thread or post here, and was told to post here.

So, I'll start. I brought an apple pie caramel with me that seemed well received, and a couple people asked for the recipe. This is fairly soft at room temp (dipable), but not runny, so adjust as needed to get the texture you want. I'm still figuring out how to do that. I assume I would decrease the final temp if I wanted to use it as a filling that could be piped when cool?

Chocoera suggested that this, with graham crackers, dipped in milk chocolate, would be yummy. I'm thinking maybe with shortbread and chocolate.

½ cup apple cider jelly*
¾ cup heavy cream
5 tablespoons unsalted butter
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
1 teaspoon cinnamon
1 teaspoon fleur de sel or kosher salt
1 ½ cups sugar
¼ cup light corn syrup
¼ cup water

Combine jelly, cream, butter, vanilla, cinnamon and salt and heat until jelly melts most of the way.

Combine sugar, corn syrup, water and sugar and heat until it begins to caramelize.

Add the cream mixture to the sugar, stir and heat to 248F. Pour.

*http://woodscidermill.com/PRODUCTS/CiderJelly.html, this is just cider boiled until it turns into a jelly. I love this stuff on lots of things, like toast, or in a marinade for pork.

So, anyone else?

Jess


Jess - I for one loved your apple cider caramel and plan on giving it a try. When you pour it, approximately what size frame (or pan) do you pour it into and approximately what thickness is the slab when poured?
Steve Lebowitz
Doer of All Things
Steven Howard Confections

Slicing a warm slab of bacon is a lot like giving a ferret a shave. No matter how careful you are, somebody's going to get hurt - Alton Brown, "Good Eats"

#63 tikidoc

tikidoc
  • participating member
  • 357 posts
  • Location:Richmond, VA

Posted 21 March 2012 - 05:55 AM

Thanks Steve! I don't have any frames (yet!), so I just lined a 9x9" Pyrex pan with parchment. I am guessing it was maybe 1/2" thick, maybe a little more. When I made it, I didn't have anything to wrap the cut caramels in, so I put them in a sous vide bag to keep them from sticking together. Then I found some paper, and when I took the caramels out of the bag, the suction had caused them to flatten a bit so they were no longer neat little squares.

Maybe someone with more caramel making expertise can advise as to what to vary to change the consistency. The recipe I modified (a pretty standard fleur de sel caramel recipe all over the web, I think initially Ina Garten's) had a cup of cream, which I decreased to 3/4 cup, then added 1/2 cup of the jelly. I figured it would make a softer caramel but did not know if I could use less cream successfully. So to firm it up, would I increase the final temp, or just back off more on the cream? And to make it a pipe-able bon-bon filling, same question, increase liquid or decrease final temp, or something else?

For anyone who wants to play with apple flavored anything and who wants to use a natural product, this apple jelly is the bomb! They also make a syrup. I have a bottle but have yet to open it.

By the way, I think Steve's airbrushed chocolates from his demo may be the prettiest ever - they are the triangle shaped ones in several of the pictures above.

Jess

#64 Chocolot

Chocolot
  • participating member
  • 436 posts
  • Location:Ogden, Ut

Posted 21 March 2012 - 06:13 AM

Thanks Jess--those were great.
Kerry will have to post her lemon curd recipe, but I just took her batch and let it sit (covered) during lunch, then ladled in some tempered white chocolate. I couldn't tell you how much. I just poured and stirred. Guessing maybe not quite half and half. I actually shouldn't have put the last bit in as it was just starting ti break.

Ruth Kendrick

Chocolot
Artisan Chocolates and Toffees
www.chocolot.com


#65 Lior

Lior
  • participating member
  • 2,127 posts
  • Location:Ashkelon,Israel

Posted 21 March 2012 - 06:38 AM

Kerry, do you use some recipe for nougat from a thermomix forum that is available to the public-like on the "official thermomix recipe site, and then adapt? I would love to try this. I am not a jealous person by nature but I really am down that I was not there once again. I was "down" elsewhere and it was not much fun at all... makes it all the worse!!!

ON an up note, I totally appreciate all the photos and comments, sharing and good will. I love that part the most. It is worth way more!

#66 tikidoc

tikidoc
  • participating member
  • 357 posts
  • Location:Richmond, VA

Posted 21 March 2012 - 06:39 AM

Thanks Ruth. I think the lemon curd was part of the Thermomix demo. Was it a fairly standard lemon curd, other than the use of fancy equipment? I have a couple decent lemon curd recipes, so unless she did something unusual, I'll just try mixing in some white chocolate to a batch.

By the way Ruth, thanks so much for taking us newbs under your wing. We were both really thrilled with the pretty chocolates we were able to make with your help.

Jess

#67 RobertM

RobertM
  • participating member
  • 468 posts
  • Location:Northern Virginia

Posted 21 March 2012 - 06:47 AM

Tikidoc; there are many things you can do to your caramel formulation. Are you using Karo in your formula? One thing to consider is that for every degree you increase your cook to you boil off 2% of the water in your caramel.

#68 tikidoc

tikidoc
  • participating member
  • 357 posts
  • Location:Richmond, VA

Posted 21 March 2012 - 07:31 AM

Bob, yes, I used Karo-type light corn syrup (store brand). Up to this point, I have been using mostly grocery items for ingredients for candies, with the exception of the apple jelly that we order once or twice a year, for use in lots of things. I'm ordering some of Albert Uster's Orchid couvertures soon (we have a semi-local rep, so no shipping charges!) - it was a joy to work with chocolate designed for candy making for the first time, rather than the general use stuff in the grocery.

I guess my goals would be to figure out what to do to keep the flavor basically the same (slight variations in degree of caramelization would be OK but I don't want to burn it or make it too light) and vary the consistency depending on the planned use. I would like to be able to firm it up slightly so that it would work well as a "stand alone" caramel - I think my formulation borders on too soft when by itself, although it worked fine for dipping. I'd also like to try to make a softer variation that could be piped into a shell for bon bons.

If I need to break this out into a new topic, let me know.

Jess

#69 Chris Hennes

Chris Hennes

    Director of Operations

  • manager
  • 8,161 posts
  • Location:Norman, Oklahoma

Posted 21 March 2012 - 08:33 AM

I'd also love to be able to recreate the blueberry ganache (Chris)


I can tell you what was in it, but the ratios got sort of sketchy at the end as I adjusted the flavors. It was basically a 1:1 ratio of white chocolate to a blueberry puree made by boiling dehydrated blueberries in water until syrupy and then blitzing in the food processor. I also added a little orange zest oil, citric acid, salt, and rum, to taste. I would have like to have at it with an immersion blender at the end, but I couldn't find one that wasn't already covered in dark chocolate :smile:.

Chris Hennes
Director of Operations
chennes@egullet.org


#70 Kerry Beal

Kerry Beal
  • participating member
  • 9,871 posts
  • Location:Ontario, Canada

Posted 21 March 2012 - 02:45 PM

Lemon Curd - thermomix

120 grams egg yolk
140 grams butter
130 grams sugar
150 grams lemon juice
grated rind of 2 lemons
1. Place all in TMX bowl with whisk. Set timer for 10 minutes, varoma temperature, speed 4. If you have any issues with curdling - remove whisk, process on speed 9 or 10 for about 30 seconds.

#71 Kerry Beal

Kerry Beal
  • participating member
  • 9,871 posts
  • Location:Ontario, Canada

Posted 21 March 2012 - 02:51 PM

Kerry, do you use some recipe for nougat from a thermomix forum that is available to the public-like on the "official thermomix recipe site, and then adapt? I would love to try this. I am not a jealous person by nature but I really am down that I was not there once again. I was "down" elsewhere and it was not much fun at all... makes it all the worse!!!

ON an up note, I totally appreciate all the photos and comments, sharing and good will. I love that part the most. It is worth way more!


Used this - but replaced the peanut butter with pistachio paste. Should have used about 60 grams instead.


Snickers nougat for TMX

400 grams sugar
150 grams glucose
125 grams water
pinch salt
60 grams egg whites
125 grams peanut butter

1. Measure sugar, glucose and water into pan. Place whisk in TMX, with pinch of salt. Start syrup boiling and when it reaches about 120ºC turn on TMX 3 minutes, speed 2, temp 37ºC.
2. When syrup reaches 132 ºC, turn TMX to speed 2, drizzle syrup through feel tube. When incorporated, reprogram for 2 minutes, varoma temperature and speed 2. When time is up, add the peanut butter and mix at speed 2 until incorporated.

#72 tikidoc

tikidoc
  • participating member
  • 357 posts
  • Location:Richmond, VA

Posted 21 March 2012 - 03:27 PM

I really liked the blood orange and habanero ganache. Does anyone know which Amoretti product was used for this? They had Artisan Natural Flavors, extracts, and compounds, and when I went to their website, they have all three in blood orange. I'd like to stick to more natural flavorings when possible. Which line works better in ganaches (and maybe caramels)?

#73 Kouign Aman

Kouign Aman
  • participating member
  • 2,653 posts
  • Location:San Diego

Posted 21 March 2012 - 03:46 PM

Hot DOG that looked like a fun weekend. Awesomely planned and executed. I'm on a sugar high just from the pictures.

Re recipes - is Recipe Gullet dead?
"You dont know everything in the world! You just know how to read!" -an ah-hah! moment for 6-yr old Miss O.

#74 Darienne

Darienne
  • participating member
  • 4,711 posts
  • Location:Rolling Hills of Cavan, Ontario

Posted 21 March 2012 - 04:56 PM

Quoting from the first page of this topic:

"Donna (curls) demoed how to flock her adorable flop eared bunny."

Please, what exactly is this and how does one do it?
Darienne


learn, learn, learn...

Cheers & Chocolates

#75 curls

curls
  • participating member
  • 389 posts
  • Location:Northern Virginia

Posted 21 March 2012 - 05:16 PM

Flocking is the process of depositing many small fiber particles (called flock) onto a surface. It can also refer to the texture produced by the process, or to any material used primarily for its flocked surface. Flocking of an article can be performed for the purpose of increasing its value in terms of the tactile sensation, aesthetics, color and appearance.

In the case of flocking a chocolate piece, you chill the piece to be flocked and then spray it with a chocolate & cocoa butter mix (one could probably also spray the chilled piece with colored cocoa butter). This gives the chocolate piece a distinctive, flocked, texture. It really helps if you can see and feel the final result.

#76 Viktoria

Viktoria
  • participating member
  • 62 posts
  • Location:Northern Virginia

Posted 21 March 2012 - 05:20 PM

There's a lovely shot of said flop-eared flocked bunny on page 1 :smile:

#77 Viktoria

Viktoria
  • participating member
  • 62 posts
  • Location:Northern Virginia

Posted 21 March 2012 - 05:23 PM

Bob,
What was in your amazing blue bonbons? I managed to bring 2 home, and after the first was shared, possession of the 2nd was hotly contested! The stout ganache, and the raspberry filling were widely appreciated as well. :biggrin:

#78 curls

curls
  • participating member
  • 389 posts
  • Location:Northern Virginia

Posted 21 March 2012 - 05:23 PM

I'd love it if we could post recipes from the conference, as a reference. There were lots of things that I tasted and would love to make, but since I could not be in two places at once, I didn't get the recipes. And there were some great fillings that people came up with on the spot, like the raspberry caramel and Bob's whiskey ganache.

If you are referring to the Jameson ganache, Bob & I concocted that. Base recipe was Grewling's liqueur ganache and we subbed Jameson for the liqueur amount in the recipe plus 6 additional capfuls of Jameson (so, add the whiskey of your choice to taste). We are going to try to get together soon and document the final weight of the added Jameson.

#79 heidih

heidih
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 10,824 posts
  • Location:Los Angeles

Posted 21 March 2012 - 05:32 PM

Re recipes - is Recipe Gullet dead?


For purposes of discussing the event,we suggested posting recipes in this current topic. Recipe Gullet - our recipe "warehouse" - is alive and well. It is not a discussion forum, so members can only post the recipe - no responses can be posted. Please feel free to post there as well to memorialize some of the great recipes.

#80 Kerry Beal

Kerry Beal
  • participating member
  • 9,871 posts
  • Location:Ontario, Canada

Posted 21 March 2012 - 05:39 PM

Flocking is the process of depositing many small fiber particles (called flock) onto a surface. It can also refer to the texture produced by the process, or to any material used primarily for its flocked surface. Flocking of an article can be performed for the purpose of increasing its value in terms of the tactile sensation, aesthetics, color and appearance.

In the case of flocking a chocolate piece, you chill the piece to be flocked and then spray it with a chocolate & cocoa butter mix (one could probably also spray the chilled piece with colored cocoa butter). This gives the chocolate piece a distinctive, flocked, texture. It really helps if you can see and feel the final result.

Posted Image

Of course there are those of us who would say that these are flocking bunnies!

#81 curls

curls
  • participating member
  • 389 posts
  • Location:Northern Virginia

Posted 21 March 2012 - 06:36 PM

Posted Image

Of course there are those of us who would say that these are flocking bunnies!

Hmmm... that must be because of the Canadian accent. :wink:

#82 Kerry Beal

Kerry Beal
  • participating member
  • 9,871 posts
  • Location:Ontario, Canada

Posted 22 March 2012 - 06:16 AM

So one thing we did on this thread last year was to ask everyone for what they learned that was new.

So I'll start - I learned that marzipan, lemon and licorice is a nice, nice combination of flavours. Thank you Mette. I also learned that eG chocolatiers are all nerds!

#83 RobertM

RobertM
  • participating member
  • 468 posts
  • Location:Northern Virginia

Posted 22 March 2012 - 06:59 AM

I learned the "concept" of Hand Dipping chocolates. I say the concept because it's obvious that it is an art that must be practiced, practiced, practiced. Everytime I watch you do a PDF, I pick up something else in addition to the last nugget I learned. I continue to try and learn to expand my thoughts on flavor development, and not to think just inside the box of a specific formula but to expand those combinations and experiment with new things - lemon curd/white chocolate with raspberry caramel? Who would have thought - but delicious.

#84 Lior

Lior
  • participating member
  • 2,127 posts
  • Location:Ashkelon,Israel

Posted 22 March 2012 - 07:00 AM

Thank you Kerry!! I will make the nougat for the upcoming holidays-great! I need to free my mind up and experiment! I guess that is how I will really get to uinderstand my TMX! I just follow recipes...
Do you heat the syrup up in the TMX? SO how do you take the temp- a laser? what setting temp do you use? I am confused...

Edited by Lior, 22 March 2012 - 07:02 AM.


#85 Kerry Beal

Kerry Beal
  • participating member
  • 9,871 posts
  • Location:Ontario, Canada

Posted 22 March 2012 - 07:41 AM

Thank you Kerry!! I will make the nougat for the upcoming holidays-great! I need to free my mind up and experiment! I guess that is how I will really get to uinderstand my TMX! I just follow recipes...
Do you heat the syrup up in the TMX? SO how do you take the temp- a laser? what setting temp do you use? I am confused...

Recipe instructions are relatively scanty - sorry. I make the syrup on the stove with a probe thermometer. So I'm whipping the eggwhites in the TMX, drizzling hot syrup through the top, then cooking at Varoma temperature to thicken it up.

#86 tikidoc

tikidoc
  • participating member
  • 357 posts
  • Location:Richmond, VA

Posted 22 March 2012 - 07:45 AM

Any suggestions on your recipes for us non-TMX owners (yea, I know, I NEED one, but they aren't sold in the US and I don't have an extra $1500 laying around)...

#87 Kerry Beal

Kerry Beal
  • participating member
  • 9,871 posts
  • Location:Ontario, Canada

Posted 22 March 2012 - 07:49 AM

Kind of civilized at work this am (I'll regret mentioning this as they will probably all roll through the door) so I'm working on next years workshop. I think we should change the name to workshop officially from conference.

I've got the college lab booked for the weekend of April 27 and 28. Hilton requires me to wait until May before we can save the block of rooms, but I'll book those from the 25th to the 29th. They will give us the Walden room again for our Friday night show and tell. We pay for the coffee and a corkage fee for them to open our wine bottles. We'll have to buy really big bottles of wine to keep our corkage fees down!

#88 Kerry Beal

Kerry Beal
  • participating member
  • 9,871 posts
  • Location:Ontario, Canada

Posted 22 March 2012 - 07:52 AM

Any suggestions on your recipes for us non-TMX owners (yea, I know, I NEED one, but they aren't sold in the US and I don't have an extra $1500 laying around)...

If you can pick up in NY - there is one on Craig's list for $900 - or was that the one in LA?

Ok, so same amounts with the eggwhite in your kitchen aid - use your heat gun on the outside of the bowl to 'cook' the mixture a bit more after the syrup is added. Mix in the nut paste.

#89 Lior

Lior
  • participating member
  • 2,127 posts
  • Location:Ashkelon,Israel

Posted 22 March 2012 - 07:55 AM

thank you so much

#90 tikidoc

tikidoc
  • participating member
  • 357 posts
  • Location:Richmond, VA

Posted 22 March 2012 - 08:37 AM


Any suggestions on your recipes for us non-TMX owners (yea, I know, I NEED one, but they aren't sold in the US and I don't have an extra $1500 laying around)...

If you can pick up in NY - there is one on Craig's list for $900 - or was that the one in LA?

Ok, so same amounts with the eggwhite in your kitchen aid - use your heat gun on the outside of the bowl to 'cook' the mixture a bit more after the syrup is added. Mix in the nut paste.


OK, so don't have an extra $900 either...

I'll give that a try.

FWIW, I don't have a (working) Kitchen Aid either. I killed mine making bread (small batch, high hydration dough, I HATE KA mixers made after the company was sold in the 1980s, they are absolute crap). I do love my Bosch Compact mixer and my Electrolux Verona though... and I'm thinking about a VitaMix or a Blendtec.





Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: Confections, Report