Jump to content


Welcome to the eG Forums!

These forums are a service of the Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, a 501c3 nonprofit organization dedicated to advancement of the culinary arts. Anyone can read the forums, however if you would like to participate in active discussions please join the Society.

Photo

Understanding Rum


  • Please log in to reply
164 replies to this topic

#151 tanstaafl2

tanstaafl2
  • participating member
  • 700 posts
  • Location:Atlanta, GA

Posted 24 July 2014 - 03:51 PM

16 years old, from a "Versailles" pot still at Diamond, according to Berry Bros. What's Enmore about it? Who knows.

 

The single wooden pot still at DDL is named the Versailles still for its original home plantation of the same name. It was moved at some point in its life to Enmore plantation before finally ending up at the current DDL location. My guess would be that your rum was distilled while the still was residing at Enmore.

 

From the DDL website:

 

The Double Wooden Pot Still originated from the Port Mourant Estate, founded in 1732, and was later moved first to Uitvlught and then, in 2000, to Diamond. In the same way the original Single Wooden Pot Still was moved from its original home at Versailles on the west bank of the Demerara River, via Enmore and Uitvlught to its present home at Diamond. These two unique copper-necked Stills are valued by blenders and other experts as a source of very heavy bodied, very flavourful and deeply aromatic rums – the ancient Green Heartwood of the Still playing a major role in the development of these distinctive characteristics. While rum from this Still is used in the blending of other El Dorado rums, the El Dorado PM Marque Single Barrel Rum is a single distillate from the Double Wooden Pot Still from the old Port Mourant Estate.


If you pick up a starving dog and make him prosperous, he will not bite you. This is the principal difference between a dog and a man. ~Mark Twain

Some people are like a Slinky. They are not really good for anything, but you still can't help but smile when you shove them down the stairs...
~tanstaafl2

#152 Hassouni

Hassouni
  • participating member
  • 1,967 posts
  • Location:DC Area/London/Beirut

Posted 24 July 2014 - 11:09 PM

Yeah. Given how much the stills were moved around though, it seems silly to call them by their estate name. For example, Uitvlugt could be any number of things...



#153 tanstaafl2

tanstaafl2
  • participating member
  • 700 posts
  • Location:Atlanta, GA

Posted 25 July 2014 - 02:40 PM

Ain't history a real hoot?

 

:raz:


If you pick up a starving dog and make him prosperous, he will not bite you. This is the principal difference between a dog and a man. ~Mark Twain

Some people are like a Slinky. They are not really good for anything, but you still can't help but smile when you shove them down the stairs...
~tanstaafl2

#154 mhdousa

mhdousa
  • participating member
  • 28 posts

Posted 25 July 2014 - 05:28 PM

So, based on recommendations here and elsewhere, I've bought a bottle of each of Smith & Cross and Wray and Nephew. I've tried mixing them and drinking them straight.  Unfortunately, I just cannot get into them. It's that totally funky taste that I can't get past. The logical conclusion is that I don't like hogo, right? 

 

Is there any hope for me? Is it an acquired taste or did the rest of you get it right away?



#155 JoNorvelleWalker

JoNorvelleWalker
  • participating member
  • 1,419 posts
  • Location:New Jersey USA

Posted 25 July 2014 - 05:59 PM

I liked S&C and W&N first time I tried them.  However I do not care for all spirits by any means.  Just thinking of that funky taste makes me salivate.  If Pavlov was right, that reaction could probably be acquired.  But maybe better to drink what you enjoy.

 

Now, if you will excuse me, I am about to go pour some La Favorite and sacrifice a lime.



#156 Kerry Beal

Kerry Beal
  • participating member
  • 9,444 posts
  • Location:Ontario, Canada

Posted 25 July 2014 - 07:00 PM

So, based on recommendations here and elsewhere, I've bought a bottle of each of Smith & Cross and Wray and Nephew. I've tried mixing them and drinking them straight.  Unfortunately, I just cannot get into them. It's that totally funky taste that I can't get past. The logical conclusion is that I don't like hogo, right? 

 

Is there any hope for me? Is it an acquired taste or did the rest of you get it right away?

I'd say acquired for me - and a matter of finding just the right thing to mix them in.  Not all rum cocktails are suitable for all kinds of rum.  I recall thinking a Jungle Bird sucked the big one - then FrogPrincesse suggested making it with Cruzan blackstrap as suggested by Sam Ross - totally different drink.



#157 ChrisTaylor

ChrisTaylor
  • host
  • 2,038 posts
  • Location:Melbourne

Posted 25 July 2014 - 08:20 PM

So, based on recommendations here and elsewhere, I've bought a bottle of each of Smith & Cross and Wray and Nephew. I've tried mixing them and drinking them straight.  Unfortunately, I just cannot get into them. It's that totally funky taste that I can't get past. The logical conclusion is that I don't like hogo, right? 

 

Is there any hope for me? Is it an acquired taste or did the rest of you get it right away?

 

I've never had W&N but I agree on S&C. I suspect you'd have that opinion about Inner Circle, too. I find these very funky rums can add a lot of depth and complexity to cocktails--a wee bit in a Mai Tai, for instance--but they are not rums I enjoy drinking straight or in more spirit-forward concoctions such as an Old Fashioned variation.


Chris Taylor

Host, eG Forums - ctaylor@egstaff.org

 

I've never met an animal I didn't enjoy with salt and pepper.

Melbourne
Harare, Victoria Falls and some places in between


#158 Hassouni

Hassouni
  • participating member
  • 1,967 posts
  • Location:DC Area/London/Beirut

Posted 27 July 2014 - 01:20 AM

I recall thinking a Jungle Bird sucked the big one - then FrogPrincesse suggested making it with Cruzan blackstrap as suggested by Sam Ross - totally different drink.

 

Bleh, I think blackstrap makes it 20,000 times worse than it already was. I can't stand this drink! (Sort of like Fernet. I know other people like it, but I think it's utterly vile)



#159 KD1191

KD1191
  • participating member
  • 915 posts
  • Location:New York

Posted 19 August 2014 - 01:44 PM

As stated above, I'm much more of a whiskey guy, but had some very interesting rums last night while visiting Three Dots and a Dash in Chicago.

 

BvXZ-L9CYAASx4E.jpg

 

I'd mentioned being intrigued by the bottle on the left at a bar in Minneapolis last week, but couldn't stomach the $50 they were asking for a pour to find out if it was any good. Paul offered me a taste, along with a couple other things he thought I'd like better. Turns out he was spot on. The Guadeloupe was somewhere between pedestrian and unpleasant. Not like any agricole I've had.

 

The Duncan Taylor 2000 Single Cask from Hampden distillery was something of a revelation. High ester, lovely proof (106.2). Complexity that makes this rum something I could sip day after day without tiring of, but still rather light.

 

And, the "Caribbean 2003"...which actually smelled suspiciously like a Cuban rum. Perhaps, because it IS (or mostly is?) a Cuban rum. It's hard to set aside the 'forbidden fruit' element of these things and judge them objectively, but I thought it was tasty. Cuban rum is my baseline for rum. Typically, it's not terribly interesting, but it's delicious. Here, the flavors were accentuated in ways that clearly pointed in the direction of Scotland, where it was aged. I couldn't exactly put my finger on it, but mentioned that there was something Scottish about it (at which point he went and got the bottle below).

 

BvXlVuGCQAEneaZ.jpg

 

If you tasted me on this blind, I'd have told you it was Scotch. Nothing crazy peaty or medicinal, but the level of smoke just clearly indicated this was Scotch. Not undelicious, just something completely out of left field for me.


True rye and true bourbon wake delight like any great wine...dignify man as possessing a palate that responds to them and ennoble his soul as shimmering with the response.

DeVoto, The Hour

#160 tanstaafl2

tanstaafl2
  • participating member
  • 700 posts
  • Location:Atlanta, GA

Posted 19 August 2014 - 02:06 PM

Sorry to hear you didn't like the Guadeloupe. It isn't a stunner, which given the price would have been nice, but I thought its unique and fairly vegetal profile despite 13 or so years of age was pretty interesting. Almost delicate and a bit sweet initially but then finishes with the prominent grassy vegetal notes on the back of the palate along with a unique burnt sugar, almost slightly rubbery, finish that I sometimes find in agricoles and takes a bit of getting used to! Certainly a complex spirit to me.

 

The Plantation Guadeloupe remains my favorite by far from that island though.


If you pick up a starving dog and make him prosperous, he will not bite you. This is the principal difference between a dog and a man. ~Mark Twain

Some people are like a Slinky. They are not really good for anything, but you still can't help but smile when you shove them down the stairs...
~tanstaafl2

#161 Hassouni

Hassouni
  • participating member
  • 1,967 posts
  • Location:DC Area/London/Beirut

Posted 19 August 2014 - 08:56 PM

Hampden distills Smith & Cross, so no surprises there, and yeah, Samaroli "Caribbean" is indeed Cuban.

 

So the Rattray Caroni was Scotch-y? It's on sale at a local boozeria and I've been thinking about getting some. For what it's worth, Sea Wynde, which is a mix of purely pot-stilled Guyanan and Jamaican rums, is smoky in a non-peaty way, too.

 

Come to think of it, why haven't I tried that in a Mai Tai....



#162 KD1191

KD1191
  • participating member
  • 915 posts
  • Location:New York

Posted 20 August 2014 - 07:29 AM

Sorry to hear you didn't like the Guadeloupe. It isn't a stunner, which given the price would have been nice, but I thought its unique and fairly vegetal profile despite 13 or so years of age was pretty interesting. Almost delicate and a bit sweet initially but then finishes with the prominent grassy vegetal notes on the back of the palate along with a unique burnt sugar, almost slightly rubbery, finish that I sometimes find in agricoles and takes a bit of getting used to! Certainly a complex spirit to me.

 

The Plantation Guadeloupe remains my favorite by far from that island though.

 

Perhaps it's a victim of my preconception of what agricole (even a well aged one) should be. My only point of reference with that many years on it would be the Saint James Extra Hors D'Age, which has so much more force and depth than the Guadeloupe. Delicate and agricole don't go together in my limited experience.

 

So the Rattray Caroni was Scotch-y?

 

Yes, indeed. It's not a peat monster, and I don't know if I'd feel as strongly about it if I hadn't just been drinking a lot of other rummy rums, but blindfolded I'd very likely have guessed it was Scotch.


True rye and true bourbon wake delight like any great wine...dignify man as possessing a palate that responds to them and ennoble his soul as shimmering with the response.

DeVoto, The Hour

#163 Hassouni

Hassouni
  • participating member
  • 1,967 posts
  • Location:DC Area/London/Beirut

Posted 20 August 2014 - 07:57 AM

For what it's worth, many independently bottled rums do have whisky-type qualities to them, but that has more to do with the absence of any added sugar, caramel, or anything else, and they tend to run on the dryer, scotch side rather than the sweeter bourbon side.



#164 Moto

Moto
  • participating member
  • 73 posts

Posted 20 August 2014 - 07:40 PM

Hassouni - is the Caroni on sale in DC?  If so which store?  I will be in DC this weekend.  I thought the Caribbean was very scotch-like.  Slighlty medicinal with hints of menthol/eucalyptus if I remember right.

 

Currently the Plantation Guadeloupe and the Hamilton 9 year from St. Lucia are the first sipping rums I reach for these days.



#165 Hassouni

Hassouni
  • participating member
  • 1,967 posts
  • Location:DC Area/London/Beirut

Posted 20 August 2014 - 08:29 PM

I saw the same Caroni at Schneider's on Capitol Hill