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Creole Mustard

Condiments

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4 replies to this topic

#1 Okanagancook

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Posted 31 January 2012 - 10:00 AM

Where I live it is difficult to get specialty ingredients. I want to make Creole Mustard to use in Paul Prudhomme's Louisiana Kitchen cookbook. We have already made our own Andouille Sausage and Tasso Ham from recipes found on the internet and here.

I have searched for Creole Mustard recipes and have only found the four listed below. Having never tasted it I don't know which one would produce a reasonably authentic mustard. Thoughts? Recipes?

Recipe 1
6 tablespoons Dijon mustard 1/2 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce Tabasco sauce or hot sauce

Recipe 2
5 tablespoons brown mustard - grainy
1 tablespoon shallot - minced
1 tablespoon molasses
2 tablespoons white wine vinegar
1/2 teaspoon Tobasco sauce or hot sauce

Recipe 3
1 cup dry white wine
1 clove garlic, peeled and minced
1 teaspoon celery seeds
1 teaspoon ground allspice
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon ground cloves
1/8 teaspoon nutmeg or mace
2 Tablespoons tarragon vinegar
2 Tablespoons malt vinegar

Place mustard seeds in a dry, heavy skillet over medium heat. Heat, uncovered, until the seeds begin to pop. Remove from heat, cover with a paper towel, and let cool, 5 to 10 minutes. Place toasted mustard seeds between 2 sheets of plastic wrap. Crush with a rolling pin until coarsely ground. (You may also use a spice grinder, but do not over-process.) Set aside.

Sterilize three 1-cup jars and lids, and leave in hot water.

In a small heavy saucepan, whisk together white wine, garlic, celery seeds, allspice, salt, cloves, and nutmeg. Bring just to the boil, immediately remove from heat, and let sit to steep, uncovered, for 2 hours.

Mix the coarse-ground toasted mustard seeds, tarragon vinegar, and malt vinegar to a paste in a large bowl. Reheat wine and spice mixture over high heat to a boil. Strain through cheesecloth or a very fine strainer into the bowl with the mustard. Whisk until well-combined. Pour into hot, sterilized jars, leaving 1/8-inch headspace, and seal with lids. Store in a cool, dry place for 3 weeks before using. Once opened, store in the refrigerator.

Recipe 4

1/2 Cup Distilled White Vinegar
1/2 tsp Crushed Red Pepper
2 Cloves Garlic, chopped
1/2 Cup Brown Mustard Seeds, crushed
1 Tbsp Freshly Grated Horseradish
Pinch Cayenne Pepper
Pinch Ground Allspice
1 tsp Kosher Salt
1 tsp Granulated Sugar
1 tsp Steen’s 100% Pure Cane Syrup
4 Tbsp Coleman’s Mustard powder
1 small canning jar with lid, sterilized

Place the vinegar, crushed red pepper, and garlic into a small saucepan, bring to a boil. Turn off the heat and let steep for 15-20 minutes then strain the mixture, discard the solids. Bring back to a boil then add the mustard seeds, turn off the heat and let steep for 30 minutes.

In a small bowl combine the vinegar with the horseradish, cayenne, salt, sugar, cane syrup, and brown mustard seed. Whisk in the mustard powder. Pour into the sterilized jar, put the lid on and process in a water bath for 15 minutes. When cool, tighten the lid, and make sure the jar is sealed. Place in a cool dark place and let mature for at least 3-4 weeks before using. This step will allow the flavors to marry and mellow which will not be able to take place in the refrigerator, although the mustard will need to be refrigerated after opening.

#2 saturnbar

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Posted 31 January 2012 - 10:35 AM

To my knowledge, creole mustard and whole grain mustard are the same thing.

#3 Dave the Cook

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Posted 31 January 2012 - 10:40 AM

saturnbar is correct. The commercial standard for Creole mustard is Zatarain's, and the ingredients are as simple as can be: vinegar, water, brown mustard seed, salt, xanthan gum.

Dave Scantland
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#4 thirtyoneknots

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Posted 31 January 2012 - 11:18 AM

I've made #4 and it came out very very stiff--needs to be thinned with water before it's spreadable. It's also rather hotter than the Zatarain's I was hoping to replicate, now that I can't locate a retail source since I moved. I saw a blog about the same recipe where the guy, without explanation, modified it to only 2.5 tbs yellow mustard and it looks much more like the consistency I would have desired.
Andy Arrington

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#5 Okanagancook

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Posted 01 February 2012 - 10:27 AM

Thanks for the feedback. The yellow mustard quantity in recipe #4 does look like a lot. Will try with less mustard and more water.





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