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Mushrooms and Fungi in China

Chinese

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#61 Mjx

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Posted 13 September 2012 - 12:26 AM

These look lovely; apart from the nuttiness you mention, is their flavour very different from that of other mushrooms? Rather depressing, that about their attrition in the wild, though.

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#62 liuzhou

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Posted 13 September 2012 - 12:51 AM

is their flavour very different from that of other mushrooms?


The flavour was sort of generically mushroomy, but sweeter than most and with a distinctive nuttiness. That may be just the way I cooked them. Further experiments may bring out the flavour more. I want to try stir frying them to see what happens. That is how my friend prefers them and she should know!

I'll let you know.It may take a few days. I seem to be booked up for banquets the next few mealtimes. It's a hard life.

Edited by liuzhou, 13 September 2012 - 01:45 AM.

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#63 Mjx

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Posted 13 September 2012 - 04:21 AM

is their flavour very different from that of other mushrooms?


The flavour was sort of generically mushroomy, but sweeter than most and with a distinctive nuttiness. That may be just the way I cooked them. Further experiments may bring out the flavour more. I want to try stir frying them to see what happens. That is how my friend prefers them and she should know!


I'm looking forward to your findings.

I'll let you know.It may take a few days. I seem to be booked up for banquets the next few mealtimes. It's a hard life.


Yep, I can tell you're suffering ;)

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#64 Ader1

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Posted 13 September 2012 - 07:24 AM

I had a kid of snack in a Chinese 'restaurant' in Chengdu. It had many of those black mushrooms (Cloud ear, Jews Ear,......)in it and it had pickled Chillies in it too. Those are the two things I remember in it...possibly some other veg like carrots but I can't remember. It was great. Any ideas what it was called? It was just a snack this guy I was with bought while we drank a beer.

Edited by Ader1, 13 September 2012 - 07:25 AM.


#65 liuzhou

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Posted 13 September 2012 - 07:41 AM

Any ideas what it was called?


I very much doubt it had a specific name. "Mixed black fungi with pickled stuff."

I guess he was just throwing together what he had - a fine tradition.
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#66 liuzhou

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Posted 14 December 2013 - 11:11 PM

I came across these today.

 

cordycep militaris 2.jpg

 

They are cordycep militaris, known in Chinese as 虫草花 (chóng cǎo huā), which literally translates as 'worm grass flower. They are neither worm, grass or flower, but a type of cultivated mushroom.

 

The name is an attempt to cash in on a supposed connection with the unrelated but much more renowned and expensive Caterpillar Fungus (Ophiocordyceps sinensis). Allegedly, they have similar if weaker nutritional and medical benefits. And are 330元/kg as compared to the 100,000元/kg the real thing can fetch.

 

Still they look kind of pretty, I suppose and they are rather good in a chicken or duck soup. They become tasteless but have a nice texture. Any nutrients are supposedly transferred to the soup and they do give it a pleasant herbal flavour and interesting colour.

cordycep militaris 1.jpg


Edited by liuzhou, 14 December 2013 - 11:27 PM.


#67 liuzhou

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Posted 19 December 2013 - 12:22 AM

And then we have dried Nameko Mushrooms (Pholiota nameko - aka Butterscotch mushroom). In Chinese, 滑子蘑 (huá zi mó).

 

These are a very popular cultivated mushroom in Japan. They are small (the cap is about the size of my thumbnail), have a gelatinous coating and are mainly used as an ingredient in miso soup. They are also sometimes stir fried. 

 

In China, they are less well known but are also occasionally used in soups, hot pots and stir fries. Overcooking tends to make them more gelatinous to the point where many people begin to find them unpleasant.

 

Nameko Mushrooms (dried).jpg

Dried Nameko Mushrooms

 

Nameko Mushrooms (rehydrated).jpg

Rehydrated Nameko Mushrooms


Edited by liuzhou, 19 December 2013 - 11:41 PM.


#68 liuzhou

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Posted 27 January 2014 - 11:21 PM

I came across these today for the first time.

 

dried shimeji2.jpg

 

They are dried shimeji mushrooms. For the fresh variety see the first post.


Edited by liuzhou, 27 January 2014 - 11:24 PM.


#69 liuzhou

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Posted 10 August 2014 - 12:58 AM

Just a quick note on the nameko mushrooms mentioned two posts back. Yesterday, I was boiling up some organic chicken trimmings (head, feet, wing tips and backbone mainly) to make a little stock. I noticed a handful of dried nameko mushrooms in the cupboard and on a whim rinsed them and threw them in with the chicken.

 

About an hour later, I strained the stock and discarded the chicken bits and mushrooms (there were also some shallots and a carrot). The mushrooms had totally transformed the stock into a umami-rich wonder. Best stock I've every made.

 

I don't much like the mushrooms for eating, but I'll be doing that again.



#70 Smithy

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Posted 10 August 2014 - 06:30 AM

Thanks for that tip. I hadn't thought of adding dried mushrooms to my chicken stock before. I'll be trying that next time; I have packages of dried mushrooms (not nameko) that I keep forgetting to use.
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#71 liuzhou

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Posted 23 August 2014 - 12:48 AM

And another.

 

Found these today. 榛蘑 (zhēn mó) which I am going to translate to Hazel Mushroom. These are dried. 

 

I haven't tried then yet and they don't fit in with today's menu. But I'll get back to you.

 

hm.jpg
 

 


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#72 liuzhou

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Posted 24 August 2014 - 10:15 PM

Here are the Hazel Mushrooms after rehydration.

 

hm1.jpg

 

I cooked them two ways. First I used some in an omelette. Not nice. The taste was great but the texture was slimy and unpleasant. Then I stuck the remainder into some chicken stock and let them simmer away for around 30 minutes. Left me with a wonderful tasting, umami rich stock. Threw the mushrooms away, though.

 

ms.jpg

 

 

The stock is now in the freezer till I think what to do with it.


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#73 Anna N

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Posted 25 August 2014 - 02:57 AM

I have often used dried porcinis to up the umami element in stocks, soups and stews and some dried shiitakes in less Western dishes. Next time I am in the Asian store I will look for other varieties of dried mushrooms.
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#74 liuzhou

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Posted 25 August 2014 - 07:19 AM

I have often used dried porcinis to up the umami element in stocks, soups and stews and some dried shiitakes in less Western dishes. Next time I am in the Asian store I will look for other varieties of dried mushrooms.

 

Yes.My standard test for most new mushrooms I come across is omelettes and stocks. I routinely use some in stocks once I get to know them.



#75 hobo

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Posted 20 October 2014 - 10:14 AM

Found these today. 榛蘑 (zhēn mó) which I am going to translate to Hazel Mushroom. These are dried.
 

These mushrooms resemble me "Honey fungus" (Armillaria). Very good mushrooms for preserving for winter in jars with salt or marinade.

 

In September I found a lot of them in the forest in Lithuania (photos bellow) and made them marinated after boiling with salt and vinegar. After 60 days after marinated they should be ready for eating.

 

opyata-4.jpg

 

opyata-3.jpg

 

opyata-6.jpg


Edited by hobo, 20 October 2014 - 10:20 AM.


#76 liuzhou

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Posted 21 October 2014 - 01:18 AM

 

These mushrooms resemble ... "Honey fungus" (Armillaria).

 

Yes they are closely related to Honey Mushrooms, if not the same thing. I merely translated the Chinese literally.

 

 


Edited by liuzhou, 21 October 2014 - 01:26 AM.


#77 hobo

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Posted 27 October 2014 - 06:01 AM

I opened few jars with these my marinated mushrooms recently and tasted them. The stems of little mushrooms are soft and good but the stems of big ones are a bit "woody". But the caps are very good of all of them.

 

The recipe was:

1. Put cleaned mushrooms in a casserole and add water.

2. Boil them for 20 min. and then discard the water.

3. Put in a casserole with mushrooms a new water and boil again for 20 min. Also you need to add (for each 1 liter of water) 2 table spoons of salt and 1 or 2 table spoons of 6% vinegar.

4. After that put the mushrooms into clean jars and pasterize (with adding to each jar 1 leaf of laurel and few grains of smelly peper).

5. After pasterizing put the jars up the bottom on the towel and keep in this position for few hours - if marinate will begin to leak out of the jar you will easily notice that.

6. After that put in a dark cool place. After 60 days they are ready for eating.

 

armillaria-mellea-mushrooms-marinated.jp

 

 

armillaria-mellea-mushrooms-marinated-2.

 

 

 

Yes they are closely related to Honey Mushrooms, if not the same thing. I merely translated the Chinese literally.

I heared somethere that these (my) mushrooms could be called also tianma mihuanjun (gastrodia honey mushroom; mihuan means honey). I am not sure, of course, because I do not speak Chinese.

 

 

 

The stock is now in the freezer till I think what to do with it.

I personally drink all the "juice" which was left in a jar from my marinated mushrooms.

 

I  was interested about these mushrooms because I also heared that they promote cerebral blood flow. One person even said me that I don't needed to discard the first water when making marinated honey mushrooms "because you will waste out the best part of them". So the "juice" could be good also.  :)


Edited by hobo, 27 October 2014 - 06:39 AM.






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