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Mushrooms and Fungi in China

Chinese

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#61 Mjx

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Posted 13 September 2012 - 12:26 AM

These look lovely; apart from the nuttiness you mention, is their flavour very different from that of other mushrooms? Rather depressing, that about their attrition in the wild, though.

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#62 liuzhou

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Posted 13 September 2012 - 12:51 AM

is their flavour very different from that of other mushrooms?


The flavour was sort of generically mushroomy, but sweeter than most and with a distinctive nuttiness. That may be just the way I cooked them. Further experiments may bring out the flavour more. I want to try stir frying them to see what happens. That is how my friend prefers them and she should know!

I'll let you know.It may take a few days. I seem to be booked up for banquets the next few mealtimes. It's a hard life.

Edited by liuzhou, 13 September 2012 - 01:45 AM.

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#63 Mjx

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Posted 13 September 2012 - 04:21 AM

is their flavour very different from that of other mushrooms?


The flavour was sort of generically mushroomy, but sweeter than most and with a distinctive nuttiness. That may be just the way I cooked them. Further experiments may bring out the flavour more. I want to try stir frying them to see what happens. That is how my friend prefers them and she should know!


I'm looking forward to your findings.

I'll let you know.It may take a few days. I seem to be booked up for banquets the next few mealtimes. It's a hard life.


Yep, I can tell you're suffering ;)

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#64 Ader1

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Posted 13 September 2012 - 07:24 AM

I had a kid of snack in a Chinese 'restaurant' in Chengdu. It had many of those black mushrooms (Cloud ear, Jews Ear,......)in it and it had pickled Chillies in it too. Those are the two things I remember in it...possibly some other veg like carrots but I can't remember. It was great. Any ideas what it was called? It was just a snack this guy I was with bought while we drank a beer.

Edited by Ader1, 13 September 2012 - 07:25 AM.


#65 liuzhou

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Posted 13 September 2012 - 07:41 AM

Any ideas what it was called?


I very much doubt it had a specific name. "Mixed black fungi with pickled stuff."

I guess he was just throwing together what he had - a fine tradition.
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#66 liuzhou

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Posted 14 December 2013 - 11:11 PM

I came across these today.

 

cordycep militaris 2.jpg

 

They are cordycep militaris, known in Chinese as 虫草花 (chóng cǎo huā), which literally translates as 'worm grass flower. They are neither worm, grass or flower, but a type of cultivated mushroom.

 

The name is an attempt to cash in on a supposed connection with the unrelated but much more renowned and expensive Caterpillar Fungus (Ophiocordyceps sinensis). Allegedly, they have similar if weaker nutritional and medical benefits. And are 330元/kg as compared to the 100,000元/kg the real thing can fetch.

 

Still they look kind of pretty, I suppose and they are rather good in a chicken or duck soup. They become tasteless but have a nice texture. Any nutrients are supposedly transferred to the soup and they do give it a pleasant herbal flavour and interesting colour.

cordycep militaris 1.jpg


Edited by liuzhou, 14 December 2013 - 11:27 PM.


#67 liuzhou

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Posted 19 December 2013 - 12:22 AM

And then we have dried Nameko Mushrooms (Pholiota nameko - aka Butterscotch mushroom). In Chinese, 滑子蘑 (huá zi mó).

 

These are a very popular cultivated mushroom in Japan. They are small (the cap is about the size of my thumbnail), have a gelatinous coating and are mainly used as an ingredient in miso soup. They are also sometimes stir fried. 

 

In China, they are less well known but are also occasionally used in soups, hot pots and stir fries. Overcooking tends to make them more gelatinous to the point where many people begin to find them unpleasant.

 

Nameko Mushrooms (dried).jpg

Dried Nameko Mushrooms

 

Nameko Mushrooms (rehydrated).jpg

Rehydrated Nameko Mushrooms


Edited by liuzhou, 19 December 2013 - 11:41 PM.


#68 liuzhou

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Posted 27 January 2014 - 11:21 PM

I came across these today for the first time.

 

dried shimeji2.jpg

 

They are dried shimeji mushrooms. For the fresh variety see the first post.


Edited by liuzhou, 27 January 2014 - 11:24 PM.






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