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eG Foodblog: ChrisTaylor (2012) - On the south east side. Down south.

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#61 Broken English

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Posted 26 January 2012 - 12:26 AM



I don't know: it's still in the post. The restaurant is incredible. I'm hoping there are recipes for the rabbit and duck egg dishes we had.


I love the restaurant, I've been three or four times and haven't had a bad moment there. From what I hear, the book is basically the story of the last few years, so it's likely that they'll be in there.

Please keep me in the loop when you do get it, and tell me if it's worth the $150 with shipping (plus the shipping back home when my overseas escapade ends ... and I already have Modernist Cuisine to send home somehow :shock: :raz: )

Try Amazon UK, they have copies.


Thanks, that seems a lot better deal. On the Marque webstore it says the book is $80, and international shipping is $60.
James.

#62 haresfur

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Posted 26 January 2012 - 01:01 AM

Thanks for the tour of the CBD. Several times I've found myself there with no idea where to eat.
It's almost never bad to feed someone.

#63 ChrisTaylor

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Posted 26 January 2012 - 03:10 PM

Australia Day BBQ

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Peanuts, pistachios and walnuts from the local nut shop.

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St. Henri '03. For a shiraz with a reputation as a bit of a monster, I was somewhat surprised at how ... mellow it was compared to the cheaper ($10-20) shiraz I'd had (i.e. most of the shiraz I'd had). It was robust, yes, not insipid or anything, but as I don't know much about wine I don't know what it was--the fact it was more than just a year or three old, the fact it wasn't aged in oak--that tamed it into something very nice. Would I run out and pay St Henri prices for St Henri again? Not right now, but I'd maybe get another bottle for a special event or gift one to someone who'd appreciate it.

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The black raspberry wine from the Korean shop. Best way to describe it is, I guess, to tell you to imagine drinking really cheap, sweet 'red' (theoretically raspberry) cordial, a staple of Australian childhoods with a reputation for making little brats 'hyper'.

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The marinated, butterflied leg of lamb. The marinade worked okay, I think. People seemed to like it. I'll use it again for Sunday night's meal.

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The sausages, from left to right (in both shots--starting from the bottom row in the case of the raw ones on the BBQ): thick beef, lamb and basil, beef w/ sundried tomato and basil, beef Cumberland, Welsh pork and leek, beef and bacon, chicken w/ cheese and spring onion, Welsh thin, Cornish beef and pork, Chicken and chive, English pork, pork Cumberland and sundried tomato w/ capsicum. The sausages--as sausages from Rob's always are--were well-received. I have to make a point of getting to that shop more regularly.

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I've never met an animal I didn't enjoy with salt and pepper.

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#64 ChrisTaylor

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Posted 26 January 2012 - 10:48 PM

Chadstone Shopping Centre

One of the largest shopping centres in the country--and, indeed, the southern hemisphere as a whole--is located just down the road. Chadstone sort of sits on the border of the middle class and upper middle class areas of the south eastern suburbs, so it caters nicely for people who have lots of money to spend on nice food. It's the closest source for expensive products such as Ortiz anchovies, tins of foie gras pate and truffle-infused olive oil.

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The centre's BreadTop store. BreadTop is one of the Chinese bakeries I was talking about earlier. This one typically stocks a decent range of western-style pastries such as lemon curd tarts and macarons, but also has all the standard BreadTop stuff, including the sausage buns.

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I snapped this place not so much because I care for it but because in recent years Cupcake Bakery and a few other, similar chains have opened up stores all over Melbourne. I'm not entirely sure what the appeal is as I don't think their cupcakes are anything special, but hey, if you're ever in Melbourne and jonesing for cupcakes, you know it's not that hard to get a fix.

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A place in one of the food courts that serves freshly-made dumplings, in addition to a wider selection of other Chinese dishes.

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Le Vin, a store that sells liqueurs. Take in an empty bottle (or buy a fancy one there) and you can get however much chocoalte port/macademia liqueur/etc you want. They also sell a small selection of imported beers and spirits (Pyrat rum, etc).

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Jasper's, my go-to coffee shop. In addition to selling coffees and cakes and such, they sell a very large variety of beans and coffee-making devices--many of which are hard to find in bricks-and-mortar stores in Australia.

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Jones the Grocer, a cafe/'gourmet' deli that sells cheeses, olives, cured meats, pastas and various tinned/jarred/canned goods.

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You can have a very nice lunch here: just ask for a platter that includes, say, two or three kinds of cheese, some white anchovies, some olives and maybe a couple kinds of cured meat. Sadly, neither of the two Jones stores I've visited sell wine, so you can enjoy those wonderful cured products with a glass of water or maybe some expensive imported lemonade.

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They also sell some cakes.

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A 'special combination' of, among other things, porcini mushrooms, parmesan cheese, black olives and balsamic vinegar.

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Merchandise for truffle fans.

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Flavoured vinegars.

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T2, part of a chain that specialises in expensive tea and tea-related goods (tea pots, tea cups, tea strainers, etc). They've been around for a few years and, I think, have helped make tea cool again in a city that's all about coffee, coffee, coffee.

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The cheese room at Simon Johnson. Simon Johnson is a chain--costlier and, I think, older than Jones the Grocer--that specialises in 'gourmet' products. It doesn't have a cafe or restaurant. In addition to a wide selection of cheeses, the cheese room (and, too, the refrigerated section in the main part of the store) contain products such as expensive anchovies, tins of foie gras pate, handmade salami (which is surprisingly reasonably priced, even compared with the mass-produced stuff you buy at the supermarket-in fact, dollar for dollar, it can be cheaper) and, particularly around Christmastime, hams and cured meats.

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The fridge in the main part of the store. Here's where you'll find the salami and, say, jars of imported feta and whatnot.

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The interior of the store. It's not very large, as you can see. In addition to the afore-mentioned products, you can buy biscuits, chocolates (Valrhona, etc), oils, vinegars, sauces and other condiments, preserves, pastas and other dried goods and a small selection of kitchenware.

Carlton

Carlton is a suburb very close to the city. It's famous for two things: Lygon Street (along and off which you will find many Italian restaurants) and the gangland killings of the 90s and early 00s.

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Donati's is a well-regarded Italian butcher that's been doing business in Carlton for a very long time.

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The French shop. In addition to some cafe-type stuff you can eat in store, you can take home a nice selection of French sausages, deli goods (including big, expensive slabs of foie gras--we're not talking about a dainty little can here) and cooked products (such as lentils, duck confit or, when the weather is right, cassoulet).

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Gewurzhaus, a specialist herb and spice dealer. It's a nice shop--very attractive inside--and quite expensive, but like Oasis it's your first port of call if you're looking for anything that's hard, if not impossible, to find in a bricks and mortar store anywhere else in Melbourne: See: file powder, anatto seeds and a range of dried chillies greater than the local Indian stores' choice of 'dried birds eye', 'dried Kashmiri' and 'dried long' chillies.

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An independent bottle shop across the road (this is the Lygon Street Keith_W mentioned earlier, by the way--I just decided not to bother with the cheap and nasty tourist trap restaurants). I ducked in here to buy a bottle of sherry for Sunday night's tapas dinner, as I figured it was about time my dad had sherry that wasn't the $5/jug Australian kind (which, sadly, is the only 'sherry' you'll find at 90% of our bottle shops, and accounts for most of the 'sherry' shelf at even Dan Murphy's).

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King's, a 'gourmet' store that's pretty much on the same block as these other places. They sell, obviously, a decent range of cheese and booze, but also cured meats and terrines (made just around the corner, actually, at a place that also supplies the Queen Victoria Market's French deli). And, too, they have all the flavoured vinegars, infused oils and expensive salts you associate with this kind of shop. I stumbled across what I suspect is a new expression of Henry of Harcourt's excellent cider and couldn't resist.

La Luna

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Located just a few blocks away on Rathdowne Street (which, I think, tends to have better quality restaurants than this end of Lygon Street) is La Luna. La Luna, the child chef Adrian Richardson, is all about meat. Richardson cures pork products of various kinds and ages grass-fed beef on site. I like La Luna. I mean, why wouldn't I love a place that introduced me to lardo and then, on the same night, offered me an off-the-menu special of orecchiette with horse shank ragu?

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Today's menu. In addition to these offerings, there were also some specials: a hamburger, Sydney rock oysters, brass grouper and a rabbit pot roast.

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Negroni. For the second time this week I taught someone how to make a cocktail--same situation in that they'd heard the name but weren't sure of ingredients. Nice touch was that when I said 'slice of orange', they automatically (and I don't know if this was the only orange they had floating around or a logical choice) put in a slice of blood orange, which worked well.

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The lardo.

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Cured meats and various pickles. The head cheese was just okay but everything else was very nice.

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The steak and kidney pie. I was told it was very nice.

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The rabbit. One of the best rabbit dishes I've had in a restaurant--up there, easily, with Marque's rabbit w/ cashews, wakame and nutmeg (my all time and possibly forever favourite) and Lake House's rabbit, sausage and lentil salad.

The haul

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An assortment of things from my trips to Chadstone and Carlton. Yet more Henry of Harcourt [King's], a bottle of sherry [the bottle shop], birds eye chilli-stuffed olives (as in take some cured olives, pit them and stuff them with whole birds eye chillies) [Jones], two kinds of Ortiz anchovies [Simon Johnson--I only wanted the normal ones, but the white ones were half price due to an Australia Day sale and nothing, of course, stirs my sense of national pride more than Spanish anchovies, discount slabs of foie gras and marked down tins of caviar] and duck confit [French shop].

Edited by ChrisTaylor, 26 January 2012 - 10:50 PM.

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I've never met an animal I didn't enjoy with salt and pepper.

Melbourne
Harare, Victoria Falls and some places in between


#65 ChrisTaylor

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Posted 27 January 2012 - 01:45 AM

Duck confit salad w/ mediocre pears

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Vinaigrette of balsamic, olive oil, shallots and Dijon mustard. Should be sherry vinegar but the Italian deli, damnnit, had sold out of the stuff. Will have to buy some in Chadstone tomorrow.

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Browning and heating the duck confit.

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The finished salad: duck confit, pears (which aren't so nice, sadly), baby spinach leaves, blue cheese and pecans.

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Heating the olives.

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The olives, as you can kind of see, are stuffed with whole birds eye chillies. This is an awesome thing.

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My favourite cider.

Chris Taylor

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I've never met an animal I didn't enjoy with salt and pepper.

Melbourne
Harare, Victoria Falls and some places in between


#66 ChrisTaylor

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Posted 27 January 2012 - 02:27 AM

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One of my new all time and forever favourite things. Straight from the tin with beer or cider. This is my perfect breakfast, morning tea, lunch, afternoon tea, dinner, dessert. Dessert especially.

Chris Taylor

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I've never met an animal I didn't enjoy with salt and pepper.

Melbourne
Harare, Victoria Falls and some places in between


#67 annachan

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Posted 27 January 2012 - 02:55 AM

Looks like Chadstone is another place I have to check out. BTW, have you tried the Umami Paste?

#68 ChrisTaylor

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Posted 27 January 2012 - 03:08 AM

Not yet. I use Vegemite for the same purpose..

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I've never met an animal I didn't enjoy with salt and pepper.

Melbourne
Harare, Victoria Falls and some places in between


#69 rotuts

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Posted 27 January 2012 - 09:26 AM

this must be the Food Capital of the World.

:wub:

#70 Hassouni

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Posted 27 January 2012 - 10:10 AM

this must be the Food Capital of the World.

:wub:


Seriously. Makes DC look like a village.

#71 rotuts

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Posted 27 January 2012 - 10:21 AM

and there's more to come I guess.

although they wont admit it I will: makes NYC seem 'lacking'


:wink:

#72 annachan

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Posted 27 January 2012 - 05:00 PM

Not yet. I use Vegemite for the same purpose..


I do as well. I put Vegemite in a lot of stuff....

#73 haresfur

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Posted 27 January 2012 - 05:09 PM

My favourite cider.

I'd have to agree with you although I like other styles, too. Makes a great French 75 variation. I need a trip to Harcourt soon. Here in the country, blokes still get a bit of a sideways look ordering a cider at the bar. Invariably Bulmer's. Still it's better than Victoria Bitter.
It's almost never bad to feed someone.

#74 ChrisTaylor

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Posted 27 January 2012 - 06:48 PM

Chadstone again

I decided to hit Chadstone for my big shopping trip--I had a lot of things to buy for tomorrow's tapas meal--as I knew I'd easily be able to find sherry vinegar there.

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Suga, a store that sells handmade lollies. You can watch them make lollies throughout the day.

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Smoked eel for sale at a seafood shop.

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A new place in the food court that sells schnitzels (beef, chicken, fish or 'vegetarian'--no veal, sadly). It was nice enough for reasonably priced food court food.

Colonial Fresh Fruit

Colonial is a chain of vaguelly upmarket green grocers. In addition to selling a good selection of fruits and vegetables (which really aren't that expensive when compared to the supermarket) they also sell grains and dried beans and lentils, cured meats, cheeses, beverages, bread, condiments and lots of other things.

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Such as meringues and Persian fairy floss.

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The fruits and vegetables are generally good quality.

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They also sell herbs and spices, although the range is hardly as extensive as, say, Oasis'.

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Cheeses, beverages (such as chinotto and 'gourmet' lemonade) and pre-packaged cured meats, ranging from blood sausage to salami.

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Breads and such.

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A section dedicated to (mostly) Italian ingredients ...

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... such as interesting oils and vinegars.

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A corner is dedicted to condiments and Middle Eastern ingredients (rose water, harissa paste, etc).

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There's also a section for East Asian ingredients.

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And a well-stocked deli section that sells everything from biltong to fresh ravioli.

Tapas - prep

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Chicken thighs marinating in a mixture of olive oil, parsley, garlic, smoked paprika, dried oregano, cumin, salt and turmeric (instead of the suggested pinch of saffron).

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Chickpeas and broad beans soaking in preparation for, respectively, dishes of chickpeas cooked with spinach and broad beans with jamon (well, proscuitto) and mint.

Tonight and tomorrow

I realise I've made Melbourne look bad: two restaurants and two times I've had to explain how to make what, I think, are 'standard' cocktails. This is not not not normal for Melbourne. I mean, okay, they were restaurants, but we plenty of good bars. Our bar scene is famously excellent. And so this evening I'll be heading into town to show off two or three nice bars--maybe Chez Regine whisky bar, maybe a couple places that specialise in classic cocktails. I'll make a slight detour and show off some parts of the Melbourne CBD I've neglected so far, including Chinatown.

Tomorrow is my last day of the blog and I'll be spending a lot of time working on my tapas meal. In the morning I might go somewhere, just for the hell of it. Maybe. We'll see what the clock decides.

Edited by ChrisTaylor, 27 January 2012 - 07:39 PM.

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I've never met an animal I didn't enjoy with salt and pepper.

Melbourne
Harare, Victoria Falls and some places in between


#75 annachan

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Posted 27 January 2012 - 10:11 PM

We just got home from Chadstone. That place is quite large. 2+ hours there and that was mostly at the Fresh Food area. I think we may be end up there regularly.

#76 Keith_W

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Posted 28 January 2012 - 05:14 AM

Great work showing off our city, Chris. I am proud of you :)

Here are a few more suggestions. No. 1 - the laneways! Melbourne city is packed full of interesting little discoveries. A graffiti laden laneway with garbage bins might lead you to the most exquisite restaurants (Movida as shown, but also Supper Inn, Gingerboy, Hutong, Coda, Degraves Lane, and a few jazz clubs and bars), a nondescript unmarked door might lead to places like Cookie, countless rooftop bars, micro cocktail bars, wood panelled establishments, or interesting shops). Show them a pic of Ponyfish Island, basically a little pontoon bar floating in the middle of the river. And maybe a few of our high end eateries in beautiful surroundings - Donovan's in St Kilda, the Botanical, the Point, Vue de Monde at the Rialto, and so on.

Still plenty of work to do ;)
There is no love more sincere than the love of food - George Bernard Shaw

#77 ChrisTaylor

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Posted 28 January 2012 - 06:22 AM

Chinatown

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Melbourne is a city of alleyways and laneways. It's possible to walk from one end of the CBD to the other, travelling entirely by laneways. Many restaurants, bars and cafes are located in laneways. This laneway off the Chinatown end of Little Bourke Street is but one example I could show you.

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A gift shop that sells abalone in a variety of forms.

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Spicy Fish, one of the better (although far from great) 'cheap and cheerful' restaurants in Chinatown.

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Looking up Little Bourke Street.

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The old location for Dainty Sichuan, the Sichuanese restaurant featured in Bourdain's No Reservations tour of Melbourne. It's now moved to one of the inner suburbs. Is it as good as he made out? Not really. And I really hope it isn't a cut above what's on offer in Sichuan itself. It's not bad, however. Worth visiting if you happen to be in South Yarra for, say, Burch & Purchese Sweet Studio or Prahran market.

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A lot of the restaurants in Chinatown (and Lygon Street, for that matter) have someone out the front, trying to attract business. Quite often in Chinatown, these people just so happen, by total accident and coincidence I'm sure, to be attractive young women. Altho' in Lygon Street the difference is that they're mostly older men.

1806

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The menu (which is very long, by the way) has tidbits of history for each and every one of the classic cocktails on offer.

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Behave.

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Sazerac: half rye, half cognac (they can/will also make it with 100% rye or 100% cognac, but the recommended blend of the two sounded like fun).

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Interior. 1806 is small, by the way, and quiet.

Random Japanese restaurant near 1806--Sushi Burger SomethingOrOther

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I needed to eat something (other than all those white anchovies I'd scoffed down before heading out) before consuming more alcohol. Just as I thought this I passed a place called Sushi Burger, er, something. A sensible person would defer to Urbanspon's 'near me' feature and maybe aboutface to get some utility dumplings in Chinatown. Sometimes I am not sensible.

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Eating on the run (or sitting on a bench on Bourke Street, around the corner from Gin Palace). The tatsutake itself was okay but some of the sides were, er, interesting, such as the random lump of meat (in the very corner of the shot).

Gin Palace

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Gin Palace is a laneway bar, although it's hardly a good example of such a thing. A true laneway bar requires you to navigate two or three laneways, getting well away from the main streets. Luckily, Melbourne is a fairly safe city.

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Martini menu.

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This is their selection of gins. They also have a lot of whiskies, rums and other spirits.

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Some gin-based cocktails.

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The one on the left is a gin and tonic with Plymoth sloe gin (my friend wanted to taste sloe gin--turns out, the flavour clashes disgustingly with the flavour of tonic water) and the one on the right is a 'Blackthorn', a mixture of sloe gin, regular gin, dubonnet and orange bitters.

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Obligatory interior shot.

Chez Regine

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This, clearly, is a bar for people who love whisk(e)y. The prices are, for such places, very reasonable.

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When this place first opened, the intent was for it to be a whisky and cigar bar. Thing is, smoking in pubs had just become illegal. Chez Regine couldn't get an exemption from this law. If you want to smoke a cigar, you need to go out the back.

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Interior shot. It's only 'bright' because of the camera flash--this place is lit softly. The guy with his back to the camera, by the way, is running whisky-tasting class for a couple of customers. These classes are a regular thing at Chez Regine.

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Part of the non-scotch whisk(e)y menu.

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Some of the more interesting beers on offer.

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Bourbons and such.

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The Islay section of the 'normal' menu. There's also an attached menu of special, limited edition whiskies (and, to celebrate the recent release of the 2012 edition of some whisk(e)y book, a selection of award-winning drams).

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The non-whisk(e)y section of the menu. The Patron Cafe, by the way, is very good--it's everything Kahlua should be.

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Some cocktails.

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Another interior shot. A very nice way to use bookshelves, I'm sure you'll agree.

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Old Fashioned with Thomas H Hardy Sazerac. Very nice. I should mention--for purists, as I know there are many of you here--that the orange peel is an optional extra. You get asked if you want it, with the assumption being that you don't want it.

Thousand Pound Bend

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Enough alcohol. I needed caffeine. My friend directed me to Thousand Pound Bend, a hipster bar/cafe/hangout just down the road (Little Lonsdale, for locals) from Melbourne Central train station. This is a place that will serve you a gin and tonic in an old jam jar. There are a lot of places like this in Brunswick (near Monsieur Truffe/Casa Iberica/random organic and booze shops).

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The coffee was pretty good. Surprisingly, for a city that's big on coffee, your options for (decent) coffee at night are very limited.

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Interior shots.

Lord of the Fries [Melbourne Central store]

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If I can't show you a kebab shop I guess I can show you another favourite of (even vegan) drunks: Lord of the Fries, a frites-focused fast food outlet that tends to set up shop near busy train stations in the CBD. The fries at the Flinders Street outlet are shit but this store is okay.

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Fries with aioli.

Edited by ChrisTaylor, 28 January 2012 - 06:24 AM.

Chris Taylor

Host, eG Forums - ctaylor@egstaff.org

 

I've never met an animal I didn't enjoy with salt and pepper.

Melbourne
Harare, Victoria Falls and some places in between


#78 kayb

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Posted 28 January 2012 - 06:17 PM

Wow. Marvelous stuff. I haven't had time to read all week, caught up tonight, and am suffering shopping overload! Oh, to have those options!
Don't ask. Eat it.

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#79 ChrisTaylor

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Posted 29 January 2012 - 01:30 AM

The end.

Tapas

I spent a hot day in a hot kitchen preparing tapas from the first and second MoVida cookbooks.

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Pork and veal meatballs jacked with parsley, garlic and such.

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Meatballs and grease.

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Preparing a spiced carrot and mint salad.

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The acidic, spiced, minty dressing.

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The meatballs in a white wine sauce.

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The marinated chicken meat from yesterday on skewers.

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Quick lunch that was on topic: toasted bread w/ tomatoes.

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The finished carrot salad.

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A couple of substitutions resulted in beans w/ proscuitto instead of expensive jamon.

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Chorizo (from Rob's British Butchery) and the chicken thigh skewers on the BBQ.

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The same tomato and capsicum salad as the other day, this time with the correct kind of vinegar.

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The finished spread.

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Some cheeses from King's, the deli in Carlton.

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Beans again.

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Desserts supplied by my sister, a near-qualified pastry chef.

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Jerez.

Farewell to Melbourne (closer to 'Mel-bern' than 'Melb-born', by the way, a point of annoyance amoung Melbournites

It's been a long week. this isn't how I normally shop, careening from Indian grocer to British butcher to BBQ restaurant. Not every day. Not even on the holidays. Melbourne has a lot to offer the tourist and the local alike, but it's not all avaliable at the same place. The supermarkets and shopping centres, even the big ones, they don't stock artisan cider and homemade biltong and slabs of foie gras and industrial-sized bottles of kenap manis. Not under the one roof. The good stuff, it's in markets and 'ethnic enclaves' and overpriced gourmet stores. You pay a lot of money or you need to explain what you want in a sort of pidgin, with much gesturing and pointing. It's spread out. Melbourne is large.

If I had another week, two weeks, a month and an unlimited food budget, I'd show you the markets in Camberwell and Prahran and Footscray and South Melbourne. The Jewish delis and bakeries near work: bagels, blintzes, chopped liver. Our population that hails from Central and Eastern Europe and their bratwursts and chevapi. The vodka place. The Sudanese and Ethiopian grocers, seling freshly made injera and berbere paste and tea and honey and gesho (the most expensive bag of sticks a homebrewer will ever buy). I'd show you Books for Cooks. The other suburbs and some country towns. Daylesford, maybe. Wineries, breweries, cideries. Harcourt. Our inner city laneways with their cafes, bars and restaurants. A Fitzroy pub famous for a burger that contains beef, chicken, bacon, a hashbrown, pineapple, beetroot, an egg. Served, naturally, with chips and salad and beer. I recommend Coopers Sparkling Ale. I'd like to show you fish and chips--with dim sims, of course--and dodgy kebabs and Sunday yum cha and three hat dining. And just because they're so big here, chocolate cafes and cupcake shops and juice bars. And local game--wallaby, muttonbird, crocodile, possum. And nasty but delicious introduced species--horse, camel, pheasant. For a good while a couple years ago, I made a systematic, concentrated, methodical effort to try all of them. Nick's Wine, a brilliant shop near work. An Argentine BBQ place. I could go on and on and on and on.

Alas, this is where we end things. Come visit some time.

Edited by ChrisTaylor, 29 January 2012 - 01:36 AM.

Chris Taylor

Host, eG Forums - ctaylor@egstaff.org

 

I've never met an animal I didn't enjoy with salt and pepper.

Melbourne
Harare, Victoria Falls and some places in between


#80 annachan

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Posted 29 January 2012 - 01:48 AM

Thanks Chris! It's been great and I got lots of good tips. No doubt I will need to find something and will look to you for guidance.

#81 ChrisTaylor

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Posted 29 January 2012 - 03:26 AM

Oh. Yeah. The jerez. Not actually in cupcake form.

Posted Image

Chris Taylor

Host, eG Forums - ctaylor@egstaff.org

 

I've never met an animal I didn't enjoy with salt and pepper.

Melbourne
Harare, Victoria Falls and some places in between


#82 ChrisZ

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Posted 29 January 2012 - 03:50 AM

Thanks, this was great. It's not just a food blog, it's practically a guidebook! And as I said earlier, I really appreciate the amount of travel you've put in. Top job :-)

#83 nickrey

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Posted 29 January 2012 - 04:42 AM

Thanks Chris, nice to see food from a Melbournian perspective. I enjoyed the trip.

Nick Reynolds, aka "nickrey"

"My doctor told me to stop having intimate dinners for four.
Unless there are three other people." Orson Welles
My eG Foodblog


#84 heidih

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Posted 30 January 2012 - 10:19 AM

Thanks for taking the time to criss cross the city in order to show us the wonderful options. That carrot and mint salad jumped out at me and will be made soon.





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