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Cooking from "Sunday Suppers at Lucques" by Suzanne Goin


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#31 Kouign Aman

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Posted 21 March 2012 - 01:16 PM

Hey, they (Specialty Produce) were in the paper recently, so I know who you are talking about.
Thanks for the info
"You dont know everything in the world! You just know how to read!" -an ah-hah! moment for 6-yr old Miss O.

#32 FrogPrincesse

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Posted 21 March 2012 - 02:48 PM

Hey, they (Specialty Produce) were in the paper recently, so I know who you are talking about.
Thanks for the info


You are welcome. Regarding Specialty Produce: they sell to a large number of restaurants in San Diego but are also open to the public from 8 to 4 (more information on their website here). You may remember that I talked about them in my eG foodblog last year (see here for a few pictures of their facility). They are very friendly and their selection is quite overwhelming. It's definitely worth a visit.

You make the whole book seem like a winner.


After using this book for a few years now, I would say that it is really solid. I made about a quarter of the recipes in the book so far (there are a lot that I made but haven't posted about on eGullet) and there is nothing that I did not like. The instructions are always very precise. Sometimes there are a lot of steps and pots & pans to clean afterwards, but the results are always great. For people who live in Southern California it's an excellent book because the recipes incorporate a lot of seasonal produce.

#33 Rodzilla

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Posted 21 March 2012 - 11:14 PM

peas and pancetta (tessa) sounds delicious! I'm impressed that you cure your own. How long have you been doing it?

#34 FrogPrincesse

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Posted 21 March 2012 - 11:32 PM

Hi Rodzilla!

Good to see you here and welcome to eGullet.

It was my first time making tesa, however I've been curing bacon regularly since first doing it about a year ago for Charcutepalooza. It has a tendency to disappear very quickly even though I make 5 or 6 pounds at a time - I give most of it to friends and family.

For the tesa, I used Paul Bertolli's recipe from Cooking by Hand. The process wasn't very different from curing bacon but the taste is completely different due to the red wine and spices that are used in the cure.

Edited by FrogPrincesse, 21 March 2012 - 11:34 PM.


#35 Rodzilla

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Posted 22 March 2012 - 11:39 PM

Thanks! I thought it was about time I made a post :smile: I definitely can see why the bacon wouldn't last long. Thanks for mentioning charceutapalooza, this is the first I've heard of it and it lead me to so many great blog posts.

I've been wanting to do some leaner curing - I really want to do tuna heart a la Chris Cosentino

#36 FrogPrincesse

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Posted 10 May 2012 - 10:11 PM

I have so much catching up to do on this thread. I can't believe that I haven't posted the Easter meal yet... In the interim here is what I made last night. I had very little time to cook so I looked for something tasty and simple.

Veal scaloppine with salsa verde-brown butter

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The veal is pounded, dredged in flour, and cooked rapidly in olive oil.
The salsa is made in a mortar and ressembles a tapenade with herbs replacing the olives (if that makes sense). It contains parsley, mint, marjoram, garlic, anchovy, capers, lemon juice, and olive oil. A little bit of the salsa is mixed with brown butter and drizzled on the veal, and the rest is served on the side.

In the book the veal is served on top of polenta and bitter greens. I ran out of steam for the polenta and instead served it with arugula and sugar snap peas.

#37 FrogPrincesse

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Posted 27 September 2012 - 04:36 PM

I made the Grilled duck breasts with crème fraîche and roasted grapes again, this time served family-style. It's a great way to cook duck breasts. Grilled with a simple juniper berry-thyme rub, they are full of flavor.

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#38 FrogPrincesse

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Posted 17 January 2013 - 11:02 AM

Treviso with roquefort, walnuts and saba

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I substituted roquefort for gorgonzola that the original recipe calls for.

Great interplay of bitter (treviso), acid (the dressing is quite zingy), salt (roquefort), sweet (saba), and even umami (roquefort). The walnuts add a welcome crunch and another layer of flavor.

#39 Marmish

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Posted 17 January 2013 - 06:53 PM

Thanks for keeping up this thread. Everything looks amazing. I had this book from the library a long time ago and had some things earmarked. Must find them. The salads you posted are especially appealing to me these days.

#40 rarerollingobject

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Posted 19 January 2013 - 04:30 AM

Beautiful food in this thread, FrogPrincesse - I'm really thinking about ordering this book now!

#41 FrogPrincesse

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Posted 21 January 2013 - 10:25 AM

Thank you for the nice words, Marmish and Kate! I am still cooking frequently from this book. I really like the flavor combinations in general, and Suzanne's attention to detail. I can't wait for her new book!

Edited by FrogPrincesse, 21 January 2013 - 10:26 AM.


#42 FrogPrincesse

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Posted 05 February 2013 - 10:43 AM

Beets and oranges with mint and orange flower water

The original recipe calls for tangerines. This is pretty much as simple as it looks. I loved the flavor combination, the earthiness of the beets with the citrus and the pop of flavor from the mint. The dressing had olive oil, red wine vinegar, shallots, citrus juice and a touch of orange flower water. The salad is finished with a little spritz of orange flower water.

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#43 Paul Bacino

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Posted 06 February 2013 - 01:16 PM

On the dinner thread a while back I talked about her phenomenal burger recipe, the Grilled Pork Burgers that I've nicknamed triple pork burgers. It's impossible to go wrong with ground pork, chorizo, and diced bacon. Also the seasoning mix of sautéed shallots and garlic, roasted cumin, thyme, parsley, and chile de arbol is especially flavorful. Then she tops the burger with Manchego cheese (which I was not familiar with before the book and now love), arugula for a touch of bitterness, and aioli (my husband decided he preferred barbecue sauce so that's what you see on the picture). They are juicy and super flavorful.

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The recipe is available hereon Google books.



I want to make these.. what buns did you use?
Its good to have Morels

#44 FrogPrincesse

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Posted 06 February 2013 - 01:20 PM


On the dinner thread a while back I talked about her phenomenal burger recipe, the Grilled Pork Burgers that I've nicknamed triple pork burgers. It's impossible to go wrong with ground pork, chorizo, and diced bacon. Also the seasoning mix of sautéed shallots and garlic, roasted cumin, thyme, parsley, and chile de arbol is especially flavorful. Then she tops the burger with Manchego cheese (which I was not familiar with before the book and now love), arugula for a touch of bitterness, and aioli (my husband decided he preferred barbecue sauce so that's what you see on the picture). They are juicy and super flavorful.

Posted Image

The recipe is available hereon Google books.



I want to make these.. what buns did you use?

I used caramelized onion rolls from a local bakery. I have a craving for pork burgers all of a sudden :-)

#45 FrogPrincesse

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Posted 20 March 2013 - 03:35 PM

Here are the Beets and tangerines with mint and orange flower water again from a recent dinner party. This time I used assorted beets from my CSA (golden, pink and red) together with tangerines (Sumo citrus) and moro blood oranges. It was fantastic.

 

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#46 Plantes Vertes

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Posted 22 March 2013 - 07:00 AM

I've really loved reading your thread, @FrogPrincesse. I hope you'll have time for more posting soon!

Edited by Plantes Vertes, 22 March 2013 - 07:01 AM.


#47 FrogPrincesse

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Posted 22 March 2013 - 09:02 AM

I've really loved reading your thread, @FrogPrincesse. I hope you'll have time for more posting soon!

 

Thanks Plantes Vertes! This reminds me that I have forgotten to post my 2012 Easter meal that was cooked mostly from the book. Better post it before Easter 2013!



#48 FrogPrincesse

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Posted 22 March 2013 - 12:55 PM

Regarding Easter 2012, here was the menu for our family meal, mostly from Sunday Suppers at Lucques.

 

Mother's ruin punch (Phil Ward)
Curried English pea soup with crème fraîche (Lucques)
Blood oranges, dates, Parmesan and almonds (Lucques)

Herb roasted rack of lamb with flageolet gratin, roasted radicchio and tapenade (Lucques)
Crème fraîche panna cotta with strawberries (Lucques)
Chocolate pots de crème (David Lebovitz
)

 

After a glass of punch, we started with the curried English pea soup with crème fraîche.

It's a pea, lettuce and mint soup. The pea and lettuce combination reminds me of a traditional French dish, braised peas with carrots and lettuce. The curry brightens the flavor of the soup and the mint adds a touch of freshness. It's comforting and evocative of spring. I have to say that I have been impressed with the soup recipes in the book, they are all very good.

 

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The recipe is available here.

 



#49 FrogPrincesse

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Posted 28 March 2013 - 12:09 PM

The second course was this salad of Blood Oranges, Dates, Parmesan and Almonds (more details here).

 

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#50 FrogPrincesse

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Posted 03 May 2013 - 12:15 PM

Better late than never... This is my Easter 2012 meal still.

 

The herb-roasted rack of lamb was served with roasted radicchio, tapenade, and a very nice flageolet gratin. The lamb was coated with thyme, rosemary, garlic, pepper and left in the fridge overnight. It was roasted in the oven after a sear on the stove. The gratin was a little bit of work but it was delicious. It has breadcrumbs, fennel, onions, garlic, and plenty of herbs (rosemary, chile de arbol, thyme, bay leaf).

 

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#51 FrogPrincesse

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Posted 15 May 2013 - 04:32 PM

Dessert was a simple crème fraîche panna cotta with strawberries. I like this dessert because it is light and appropriate for spring, plus it's a good way to showcase fresh fruit. As an additional bonus,  it is prepared in advance. The strawberries were just sliced and mixed with sugar 10 minutes before serving.

 

A well-made panna cotta can be very satisfying.

 

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#52 FrogPrincesse

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Posted 04 June 2013 - 02:01 PM

Spot prawns with tomato confit, garlic, and chile

 

I am still daydreaming about this one a few weeks later. I was super excited to buy a few pounds of local spot prawns recently because they are really special. It's hard to describe but they have a better texture and flavor than any other prawns I have had.

 

The recipe starts by slow-cooking yellow tomatoes in the oven in a mix of olive oil and water, together with a sliced red onion, garlic, herbs (oregano + basil) and chiles. This step can be done in advance.

 

before

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after

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This cooking step extracts all the wonderful flavors from the tomatoes. Then they are blended (minus the herbs and part of the chiles) with part of the liquid. They emulsify very rapidly to form a thick "sauce" with a beautiful yellow color.

 

The spot prawns are deveined and cooked shell-on in a pan with a little bit of olive oil. The prawns are set aside for a few minutes while the same pan is used to cook shallots, thyme, chile de arbol, garlic and cherry tomatoes sliced in half (I also added a little bit of fresh corn). Using the same pan ensure that all the juices from the prawns are incorporated into the sauce. Then the prawns are added back to blend all the flavors together. The prawns seasoned with lemon juice are served on top of the yellow tomato confit together with plenty of bread.

 

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