Jump to content


Welcome to the eG Forums!

These forums are a service of the Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, a 501c3 nonprofit organization dedicated to advancement of the culinary arts. Anyone can read the forums, however if you would like to participate in active discussions please join the Society.

Photo

New Orleans 2011 casual


  • Please log in to reply
27 replies to this topic

#1 heidih

heidih
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 10,837 posts
  • Location:Los Angeles

Posted 12 November 2011 - 09:14 PM

It looks like I will be solo in New Orleans over Thanksgiving. Probably staying in a B & B in the Garden District or hotel in French Quarter. I would love a poor boy sandwich rec as well as any other pubic transport accessible delights. I do not think I want to try the biggy restos like Galatoires by myself.

#2 MikeHartnett

MikeHartnett
  • participating member
  • 672 posts
  • Location:New Orleans

Posted 13 November 2011 - 08:04 AM

Ok. As far as po boys go, I think your best options [relatively] close to public transportation are Mahony's or Tracey's (which is where the kitchen staff from Parasol's moved). Both of these are on Magazine, which is a few blocks' walk from the St. Charles streetcar line, depending on how far down the line you are (the shape of the city means some of the main streets vary greatly in distance depending on where you're at). Tracey's is known for its roast beef po boy, while Mahony's does most things pretty well, including classics and a few non-classics, like fried chicken livers with cole slaw.

As far as other dining options, could you give a little more info on how long you'll be here/which meals you're looking to eat, etc.?

#3 kayb

kayb
  • society donor
  • 899 posts

Posted 13 November 2011 - 08:06 AM

I'm personally quite fond of Acme Oyster House. Cafe du Monde, of course, is a must for breakfast, despite the lines. For dinner, try Mr. B's Bistro, on Royal; smallish, compared to some of the places, but a lovely place to enjoy some Crescent City favorites. Have a drink in the lobby bar of the Roosevelt Hotel on Canal, and an appetizer and a glass of wine at Restaurant August. (FWIW, I didn't care for the rabbit sausage there -- too fennel-y -- but the figs and fresh mozzarella were magnificent.)
Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

#4 lights19

lights19
  • participating member
  • 19 posts

Posted 13 November 2011 - 05:57 PM

In the French Quarter, I'm a big fan of Coop's for jambalaya, gumbo and red beans and rice. It's not fancy, but it's always my first stop after landing! Green Goddess is another great place. Interesting drinks, dishes based on cuisines from all over, and a funky vibe.

Grabbing a seat at Cochon's bar or the counter overlooking the kitchen would be perfect for a solo diner. It's in the Warehouse district, a short walk from the Quarter. You can't really miss with most of their small plates - rabbit livers, boudin, and any pork-based charcuterie.

Since the Parasol's people are now at Tracey's, it would be the go-to spot for a po'boy. In the Quarter, Johnny's is reliable (I preferred it to Mother's). Parkway is another good option for po'boys, but some would say it wouldn't be the best to walk by yourself. I've been there in the day time, with others, so I've always felt fine. You'd need to catch the Canal street car and it's about a 5/10 minute walk.

#5 HungryC

HungryC
  • participating member
  • 1,503 posts
  • Location:greater New Orleans

Posted 14 November 2011 - 09:55 AM

Aforementioned Tracy's & Mahoney's are good, but I'd have to add Cochon Butcher in the Warehouse district if you're into sandwiches. Not poboys, but full of house-cured meats and great flavors. Also worth a stop: the fried seafood sandwiches at Casamento's: cornflour crusted, fried in lard, served on toasted pan bread. The trout sandwich or fried oyster loaf are classic.

#6 MikeHartnett

MikeHartnett
  • participating member
  • 672 posts
  • Location:New Orleans

Posted 14 November 2011 - 10:07 AM

Aforementioned Tracy's & Mahoney's are good, but I'd have to add Cochon Butcher in the Warehouse district if you're into sandwiches. Not poboys, but full of house-cured meats and great flavors. Also worth a stop: the fried seafood sandwiches at Casamento's: cornflour crusted, fried in lard, served on toasted pan bread. The trout sandwich or fried oyster loaf are classic.


As always, Celeste is on the money.

#7 KD1191

KD1191
  • participating member
  • 954 posts
  • Location:New York

Posted 14 November 2011 - 11:37 AM

In the French Quarter, I'm a big fan of Coop's for jambalaya, gumbo and red beans and rice. It's not fancy, but it's always my first stop after landing!

I loved Coop's, even preferred the fried chicken to Willie Mae's.
True rye and true bourbon wake delight like any great wine...dignify man as possessing a palate that responds to them and ennoble his soul as shimmering with the response.

DeVoto, The Hour

#8 sahmd

sahmd
  • participating member
  • 19 posts

Posted 14 November 2011 - 11:45 AM

A stop at The Praline Connection on Frenchman Street for ribs (or fried chicken) with mac and cheese and greens is a non-negotiable part of any trip I make to New Orleans.

#9 heidih

heidih
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 10,837 posts
  • Location:Los Angeles

Posted 15 November 2011 - 07:50 PM

Thanks for all the ideas. I will have 2 full days and a morning. Coop's and Casamento's are looking like musts. Cochon's bar sounds like a nice evening meal. The idea of fried chicken livers and coleslaw at Mahoney's rang a bell. I am going to map out the locations. Just booked a room in the French Quarter so that is "home base".

#10 MikeHartnett

MikeHartnett
  • participating member
  • 672 posts
  • Location:New Orleans

Posted 15 November 2011 - 08:00 PM

You've got it all right. Cochon, though, is a must if any of them are. Just didn't realize what you were looking for initially...

#11 heidih

heidih
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 10,837 posts
  • Location:Los Angeles

Posted 15 November 2011 - 08:02 PM

You've got it all right. Cochon, though, is a must if any of them are. Just didn't realize what you were looking for initially...


Neither did I until all the delicious ideas appeared :biggrin:

#12 heidih

heidih
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 10,837 posts
  • Location:Los Angeles

Posted 15 November 2011 - 08:06 PM

Unfortunately one of my full days is Thanksgiving so I will call before I leave to check on any closures for the holiday

#13 heidih

heidih
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 10,837 posts
  • Location:Los Angeles

Posted 15 November 2011 - 08:16 PM

At Cochon the combo that looked good to me as a solo diner was marinated brussel sprouts, hot boudin, and the duck pastrami slider. Can anyone comment on those items?

#14 KaffeeKlatsch

KaffeeKlatsch
  • participating member
  • 50 posts

Posted 16 November 2011 - 07:17 AM

A bit touristy, but was always a safe bet for recommendations is The Gumbo Shop. They have all the dishes you'd expect to find in NOLA. Prices have always been reasonable, though I have been away from there for a few years, and it's just down the street from the St. Louis Cathedral. Very convenient if transportation is limited.

#15 MikeHartnett

MikeHartnett
  • participating member
  • 672 posts
  • Location:New Orleans

Posted 16 November 2011 - 07:28 AM

At Cochon the combo that looked good to me as a solo diner was marinated brussel sprouts, hot boudin, and the duck pastrami slider. Can anyone comment on those items?


I think you're looking at Cochon Butcher, which is very, very good, but personally, I would recommend Cochon over it. Butcher is a sandwich and small plates kind of place-- we go there for lunch a lot. Cochon is a sit-down restaurant. If you do choose Butcher, though, those sound like good choices; my girlfriend loves the brisket sliders, too.

#16 HungryC

HungryC
  • participating member
  • 1,503 posts
  • Location:greater New Orleans

Posted 16 November 2011 - 08:17 AM


At Cochon the combo that looked good to me as a solo diner was marinated brussel sprouts, hot boudin, and the duck pastrami slider. Can anyone comment on those items?


I think you're looking at Cochon Butcher, which is very, very good, but personally, I would recommend Cochon over it. Butcher is a sandwich and small plates kind of place-- we go there for lunch a lot. Cochon is a sit-down restaurant. If you do choose Butcher, though, those sound like good choices; my girlfriend loves the brisket sliders, too.

yes, do know that Cochon Butcher is wholly separate from Cochon proper. It's connected, but the two have different menus & focus. Butcher is a casual, sandwiches & small places spot, good for a quick bite, with stools & counter seating.

#17 heidih

heidih
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 10,837 posts
  • Location:Los Angeles

Posted 16 November 2011 - 07:40 PM

Thanks all for the clarifications on Cochon versus Butcher. I went back and read some older topics here with many references and pictures of both as well as some of the other places suggested. I am going to take some time tomorrow to sort it all out and come up with a flexible plan. I am SO looking forward to this adventure.

#18 lights19

lights19
  • participating member
  • 19 posts

Posted 16 November 2011 - 09:16 PM

Please share a report and pictures when you get back! I feel like NOLA is a second home, and the six months since I've been there last are simply too long!

#19 heidih

heidih
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 10,837 posts
  • Location:Los Angeles

Posted 20 November 2011 - 07:08 PM

I have all the suggestions with menu ideas in my notebook and have decided not to be too rigid. I will see where I am when hungry and work off the list as well as asking for suggestions when there.

I must say that Cochon versus The Butcher is sounding awfully tempting. Any thoughts on a solo diner, especially one that either does not order alot and possibly does not finish everything? I love to sample, but get bogged down with quantity and will not be in a situation for taking leftovers. I hate to insult the kitchen. Also, can you give me an idea of the "dress code"?

Thank you all for your help. I will report back.

#20 MikeHartnett

MikeHartnett
  • participating member
  • 672 posts
  • Location:New Orleans

Posted 20 November 2011 - 08:29 PM

I don't think being solo will be a problem at all at Cochon. They have both a typical bar and a bar with a kitchen view that you could sit at. Plus, Cochon's small plates are pretty conducive to mixing and matching to suit your appetite, and they get tourists by the boatload, so I'm sure they'll understand you not being able to take home leftovers. And the dress code is more or less whatever you feel like. People frequently wear shorts and aren't out of place.

#21 philadining

philadining
  • participating member
  • 2,603 posts
  • Location:Philaburbia

Posted 21 November 2011 - 06:08 PM

Dining at Cochon solo would be no problem at all, as Mike said, there are two bars, and I'd actually say the kitchen bar is the best spot for anyone into food anyway, solo or not. Obviously bars are not great for larger groups, but in you're alone, or just with one or two companions, it's fun to watch the chefs, and you might be able to get in a conversation with them, depending on how crazed things are, who's working, etc. If you order interesting things, they might notice, and you could get some special attention, especially if they notice that you're on your own.

That said, the place is packed to the rafters much of the time these days, so it's possible that the staff is not going to have time for any of that. You'll certainly have a better chance on a slower day.

I've gone to both Cochon and Butcher within a few days of each other. They're different enough experiences that it's not like you need to pick between them. If you have time, do both. If you had to pick one, I'd choose the main restaurant.

And as mentioned above, despite being right in a major tourist area, Johhny's Po Boys are pretty righteous. If you don't want to leave the quarter, you could do worse...

"Philadelphia’s premier soup dumpling blogger" - Foobooz

philadining.com

#22 KaffeeKlatsch

KaffeeKlatsch
  • participating member
  • 50 posts

Posted 22 November 2011 - 09:21 AM

I don't know how I missed mention of it earlier or forgot it myself, but let me also recommend Johnny's in the Quarter. I'm glad to see it's still getting good reviews. I worked in the Quarter about 30 years ago and would pass by Johnny's while I walked from my bus stop. I would grab breakfast, usually biscuit sandwiches, for the office once or twice a week. We'd also go there for lunch about once a week. Johnny was always so warm and welcoming and the food was fantastic.

What a great memory. Thanks!

#23 heidih

heidih
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 10,837 posts
  • Location:Los Angeles

Posted 23 November 2011 - 07:02 PM

After arriving this afternoon I walked over to Coop's as it was the closest place among the recs. Then I made a mistake - I was so starved having gotten up almost 12 hours before to get to the airport and refusing to eat crud food en route - I was really hungry. I know better than to order a sampler platter.....However- there were some good things. First they brought out a little bowl of seafood gumbo that was green and earthy tasting. The broth was excellent. I would have enjoyed a bowl of mostly broth with the bits of seafood (one plump shrimp and oyster each and a little crab claw) along with just a touch of rice. Unfortunately it was loaded with rice and green pepper/celery so I fished out the seafood and slurped up the broth.

There was a forgettable chicken wing billed as "fried chicken" that was flavorful and the meat pulled off the bone, but is pretty much the rule with these combos - was reheated.

The shrimp creole had a few nice shrimp but tasted mostly of tomato.

The rabbit and sausage jambalaya suffered the most from the "sampler" concept - reheated and sort of stuck together. The flavors were decent. I picked out the sausage that was quite nice and made little bites with the soft roll they served when I sat down. It made me reconsider my mental aversion to a sausage po' boy.

This was all redeemed by the red beans & rice: huge plump beans that had retained their integrity but were creamy with no tough skin. The deal closer was the pork shoulder they cooked them with. Almost half the serving consisted of flavorful porky shreds. I would go back for a bowl of that goodness.

#24 Pierogi

Pierogi
  • participating member
  • 1,476 posts
  • Location:Long Beach, CA

Posted 23 November 2011 - 11:57 PM

Heidi, hopefully this isn't too late for you to find some utility. The current issue of Saveur (#142 in their annoying system) has an article about smaller restaurants in NOLA. The featured restaurant, Dominique's, sounds right up your alley. Here's the link to the on-line article Saveur Linkie. Pay attention too, the sidebar with the clickable "New and Notable Restaurants In New Orleans". Look off to the right of the main link, you should find it.

Unfortunately, I'm about a month behind in my food magazine readings, otherwise I'd have sent this to you before you left !

Those RB&R sounded wonderful. Have a beignet & chicory coffee for me, and maybe a Sazarac !
--Roberta--
"Let's slip out of these wet clothes, and into a dry Martini" - Robert Benchley
Pierogi's eG Foodblog

My *outside* blog, "A Pound Of Yeast"

#25 MikeHartnett

MikeHartnett
  • participating member
  • 672 posts
  • Location:New Orleans

Posted 24 November 2011 - 07:48 AM

FYI, Dominique's chef when that article was written, Dominique Macquet, left the restaurant, and it recently reopened under a different name. I'd avoid it because of the transition. Maybe it's great, but I haven't heard anything yet.

Edited by MikeHartnett, 24 November 2011 - 07:48 AM.


#26 Pierogi

Pierogi
  • participating member
  • 1,476 posts
  • Location:Long Beach, CA

Posted 24 November 2011 - 11:35 PM

FYI, Dominique's chef when that article was written, Dominique Macquet, left the restaurant, and it recently reopened under a different name. I'd avoid it because of the transition. Maybe it's great, but I haven't heard anything yet.

Bummer that. Wonder what happened? The chef sounded like a really cool guy, and committed to the project. Guess you really can't trust anything anymore.....
--Roberta--
"Let's slip out of these wet clothes, and into a dry Martini" - Robert Benchley
Pierogi's eG Foodblog

My *outside* blog, "A Pound Of Yeast"

#27 MikeHartnett

MikeHartnett
  • participating member
  • 672 posts
  • Location:New Orleans

Posted 25 November 2011 - 12:02 PM

Well, it seems like he plans on reopening in a different location, and he's also working with another chef on a French-Vietnamese restaurant called Tamarind.

#28 heidih

heidih
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 10,837 posts
  • Location:Los Angeles

Posted 25 November 2011 - 03:20 PM

Many many thanks to those who urged me to go for Cochon versus just dropping into The Butcher.

Had lunch there today - the rabbit livers (I am stealing the concept of the mint/parsley/pepper jelly/pickled onion "garnish"), the pork cheek on a potato/sauerkraut cake (more like lovely mashed with a hint of the kraut) with elevating sauces, and the smothered greens (tender, slightly bitter, accented with bits of pork) - the latter improved by the house made hot pepper vinegar.

The lovely couple next to me ordered the boudin balls - they had been waffling between that and the pork cheek so we shared tastes. The boudin was really flavorful and enhanced by the pepper jelly still on my plate. The gentleman also gave me a taste of his roasted redfish - a lovely clean simple bite sparked up by the pickled onion on the side. Completely underlined the downside of dining alone - sharing is so much more enjoyable.

As to atmosphere - it is very low key. Service was down to earth. The tables are nicely spaced- luckily the two tops are close enough to share food but not touch elbows :)