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Percyn's travels (2011) continued


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#31 pastameshugana

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Posted 02 November 2011 - 11:03 AM

Percyn - A few posts back you have a pic of someone weighing something, and the sign to the right lists "chicken ham" which, along with some other stuff, is the cheapest thing. What is "chicken ham"? Ham and chicken ground together, or mixed after grinding? Or something else altogether? Thanks.


Country - Chicken ham is a 'ham like' product that is made from chicken, thus it is Halal (an approximate equivalent to Kosher, but for Muslims).

In India you'll find all sorts of things like that: Chicken ham, chicken pepperoni, salami (the Subway's have a wide variety).

There are similar products in Israel, as well. Also in Israel I found bacon vacu-sealed at the hotels (so Kosher kitchens wouldn't be corrupted) and re-heated.

(Sorry Percyn!)

NOTE: It's interesting that the words Halal and Kosher both mean approximately the same thing (legal, prepared according to religious law) but in their respective languages.
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#32 percyn

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Posted 03 November 2011 - 12:44 AM

Sorry, have been busy traveling between cities, so am glad that Jenni and PastaMeshugana are helping out. :cool:

#33 percyn

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Posted 03 November 2011 - 03:55 AM


For dinner one night we made

Titori - a type of broad? bean




and French Beans with Chicken (it is usually made with Goat)



These look fantastic! How were they made?


The basic masala is the same - turmeric, chili powder, cumin seeds and garam masala. Marinate the meat in turmeric, a little chili powder, garlic and ginger. Sautee the meat and remove. Then add finely diced onions. The Titori has coriander/cilantro leaves. In the French beans, a little desiccated coconut and tomato is also added. Return the meat and cook to desired tenderness.

#34 percyn

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Posted 03 November 2011 - 04:04 AM

Breakfast yesterday consisted of

Paneer Bhurji

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and a Fresh Coconut and Mousambi
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#35 Jenni

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Posted 03 November 2011 - 04:47 AM

Percy, your paneer bhurji looks interesting. It seems to be more like chunks of paneer whereas the bhurji I have always made or eaten out has been crumbled paneer so that it resembles scrambled eggs. Did you make it or eat it out somewhere?

By the way I thought of you whilst having a glass of sugarcane juice today. In Allahabad the most common add in is mint, but there are a couple of guys who have a number of greens including coriander and spinach that they will add to the sugarcane and juice for you!

#36 percyn

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Posted 03 November 2011 - 05:39 AM

Jenni,
You are correct that most Paneer Bhurji has crumbled paneer, though I prefer chunks as well, so this had both :biggrin:

Interesting about the sugarcane juice. I have always had it either plain or with ginger and lime, which is my preference. Don't believe I have ever seen the option for spinach in this neck of the woods and even in the US the few places that serve it offer ginger and lime as an option.

Edited by percyn, 03 November 2011 - 05:41 AM.


#37 percyn

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Posted 03 November 2011 - 07:36 PM

Malls seem to be springing up in most urban areas across India. While this is good for the economy, it also provides for many decent food courts where you can find things such as:

Chicken Frankie

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Chaat

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Tokri
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and

Kadhai Chicken with Tandoori Roti

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#38 percyn

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Posted 03 November 2011 - 07:55 PM

Was running some errands around Perviz Hall, which sells Parsi food goodies among other things.

We picked up a couple items including patties for lunch.

Mutton Kheema Patties and Chutney Patties. These patties are breaded mashed potatoes stuffed with the filling and a boiled egg. A non-veg version of the Vada :laugh: . Delicious!

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We had the patties with Kheema and Khidchi.

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#39 percyn

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Posted 05 November 2011 - 06:34 AM

Went to a store in Matunga which sells lots of Indian snacks, including Chikki. Picked up some tomato sev and other spices.

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Outside the store is a place which sells chaat. We got Pani Puri (crispy puri puffs with stuffing and spiced water) and Dhai puri, which has a tanrind and date sauce and is topped with yogurt.

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The Pani (water) Puri
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The Dhai (yogurt) Puri
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Next to them was a Paan guy, so we got some sweet paan to go.
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For dinner, we went to an area called Borhi Muhllah (by Tavakal Sweets),which is known for making great grilled meats. This area was also featured on Anthony Bourdain's No Reservation Mumbai episode.

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We got goat, khiri (goat udders), shish kebab, roti, etc. This is stuff is tasty and soo cheap! 4 people were full for less than $10.

#40 Darienne

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Posted 05 November 2011 - 03:10 PM


Darienne, what kind of chikki do you plan to make?

I have no idea at this point. It's up to the teaching chef I guess. I wrote to her that I had some panela...you can't get it here...but in her reply she didn't mention that.

What is your favorite kind? Or favorites? And do you make it usually? Any tips to give me???? :smile:

Yesterday I made the Mexican equivalent of chikki using a very dark panela (the same pretty much as jaggery) called palanquetas. I added pepitas, almonds, pine nuts and sesame seeds. Delicious. Monday I am going to take some to my dentist who is from India and longs for homemade goodies.

(I have this awful suspicion that the chef's chikki is going to call for white sugar. She sort of hemmed and hawed when I asked her today in person.)
Darienne


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#41 ajitg

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Posted 07 November 2011 - 07:50 AM



Darienne, what kind of chikki do you plan to make?


I have no idea at this point. It's up to the teaching chef I guess. I wrote to her that I had some panela...you can't get it here...but in her reply she didn't mention that.

What is your favorite kind? Or favorites? And do you make it usually? Any tips to give me???? :smile:


Yesterday I made the Mexican equivalent of chikki using a very dark panela (the same pretty much as jaggery) called palanquetas. I added pepitas, almonds, pine nuts and sesame seeds. Delicious. Monday I am going to take some to my dentist who is from India and longs for homemade goodies.

(I have this awful suspicion that the chef's chikki is going to call for white sugar. She sort of hemmed and hawed when I asked her today in person.)

Using jaggery (or in your case panela) gives a flavour profile that cannot be had by using white sugar. Chikkis are simply awesome. Sometimes in India you can get good rose petal and pistachio chikkis which are also very good.


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#42 Darienne

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Posted 07 November 2011 - 08:02 AM




Darienne, what kind of chikki do you plan to make?


I have no idea at this point. It's up to the teaching chef I guess. I wrote to her that I had some panela...you can't get it here...but in her reply she didn't mention that.

What is your favorite kind? Or favorites? And do you make it usually? Any tips to give me???? :smile:


Yesterday I made the Mexican equivalent of chikki using a very dark panela (the same pretty much as jaggery) called palanquetas. I added pepitas, almonds, pine nuts and sesame seeds. Delicious. Monday I am going to take some to my dentist who is from India and longs for homemade goodies.

(I have this awful suspicion that the chef's chikki is going to call for white sugar. She sort of hemmed and hawed when I asked her today in person.)

Using jaggery (or in your case panela) gives a flavour profile that cannot be had by using white sugar. Chikkis are simply awesome. Sometimes in India you can get good rose petal and pistachio chikkis which are also very good.


-- Sent from my HP TouchPad using Communities

Pistachios. Will get some today. Thanks. And I think I have some rosewater. Would you use both at once? Thanks.
Darienne


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Cheers & Chocolates

#43 ajitg

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Posted 07 November 2011 - 08:39 AM

Went to a store in Matunga which sells lots of Indian snacks, including Chikki. Picked up some tomato sev and other spices.



Outside the store is a place which sells chaat. We got Pani Puri (crispy puri puffs with stuffing and spiced water) and Dhai puri, which has a tanrind and date sauce and is topped with yogurt.



The Pani (water) Puri


The Dhai (yogurt) Puri


Next to them was a Paan guy, so we got some sweet paan to go.


For dinner, we went to an area called Borhi Muhllah (by Tavakal Sweets),which is known for making great grilled meats. This area was also featured on Anthony Bourdain's No Reservation Mumbai episode.









We got goat, khiri (goat udders), shish kebab, roti, etc. This is stuff is tasty and soo cheap! 4 people were full for less than $10.


Percy,

Thanks for your awesome descriptions of food and travels in Mumbai. Have been loving all the Parsi food photos especially.....any chance you can provide some recipes once ur back home?

What cities/towns do you have lined up next?

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#44 percyn

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Posted 12 November 2011 - 11:44 AM

Percy,

Thanks for your awesome descriptions of food and travels in Mumbai. Have been loving all the Parsi food photos especially.....any chance you can provide some recipes once ur back home?

What cities/towns do you have lined up next?

Ajitg, sure - let me know which recipes you would like.

#45 percyn

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Posted 12 November 2011 - 12:06 PM

Sorry for the lull in posting, travel and internet connection issues got in the way.

Having been to Iron Chef Morimoto's in Philadelphia a few dozen times, I wanted to check out his restaurant Wasabi at the Taj Palace near Gateway to India.

We went for the Omakase, which included-

Edamame
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Kobe Beef Carpaccio
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Signature Whitefish Carpaccio
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Hamachi and Jalapeno
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Spinach with Sesame sauce
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Rock Shrimp Tempura in Spicy Mayo Sauce
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Sushi and Sashimi - Spicy tuna, Salmon, O Toro, Unagi
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with the real Wasabi from Japan, rubbed on Sharkskin.
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Beef Teppanyaki
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Fried Rice
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Seabass
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Miso marinated Black Cod
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Barley tea - nice nutty flavor
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Cool tea pot
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Green tea ice cream and sweet red beans
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Wasabi infused Creme Brulee
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Overall the experience was quite good and in typical Japanese style was subtle but highlighted the key ingredient. The quality of food and service was on par with the other Morimoto restaurants I have been to, which is to say it is quite good. The price was also in the same ballpark, which is to say it is about 2-3 times higher than other fine dining restaurants in India.

#46 percyn

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Posted 12 November 2011 - 12:22 PM

Back to some Indian food, this time at the critically acclaimed Punjab Grill, owned by Chef Jiggs Kalra, known as the "Czar of Indian Cuisine", where we ordered

Kesar Lassi - which had some pendas (sweets)
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Tandoori Lambchops
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Tandoori mixed Grill
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Punjab Meat
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Kashmiri Biryani - with almond stuffed morel mushrooms
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Towards the end of the meal, they bring you a finger bowl, which seemed to confuse a few on the large table of Europeans seated next to us.
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Edited by percyn, 12 November 2011 - 12:44 PM.


#47 percyn

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Posted 12 November 2011 - 12:24 PM

Pistachios. Will get some today. Thanks. And I think I have some rosewater. Would you use both at once? Thanks.

Yes, but be careful with the amount of rosewater you use as it can be a strong flavor.

#48 percyn

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Posted 12 November 2011 - 12:36 PM

Many moons ago, as a kid, I lived near Swati, which is now a very famous snack place and there is a constant line to be seated, but it is worth the wait.

After a 30min wait, we ordered

Amiri Khaman
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Dahi Puri - one of my favorite chaat snacks, but it was not as good as I remembered and preferred Kailash Prabat's version, where I believe the puris are fried in pure ghee, giving it a rich flavor and crisper texture.
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Misal
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Gujrati Dal Dhokla - a tasty vegetarian version of chicken and dumplings
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served with a Papad topped with the oil from pickle or Achar
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Fresh Sitaful ice cream
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Kala Khatta ice gola - sweet, sour, touch of spice from the chaat masala
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#49 percyn

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Posted 12 November 2011 - 12:42 PM

Also managed to squeeze in a trip to Leopold cafe, a popular hangout spot with ex-pats since 1871, which was unfortunately a target in the 2008 bombings in Mumbai.

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Mango shake
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Fresh lime soda
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Chicken chelo kebab - unfortunatley it was a bit dry and I should have gone for the beef (or was it lamb?) version
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Indo-Chinese peppered chili beef
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#50 Darienne

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Posted 12 November 2011 - 02:24 PM

Still reading and still loving every photo and every piece of information. The food looks divine. We don't eat much Indian food anymore for some unknown reason and I really miss it. Must start in again and learn some new recipes.

Thanks Percyn.
Darienne


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#51 prasantrin

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Posted 12 November 2011 - 02:29 PM

I'd like to see some Indian Chinese food. How are the flavours different from American Chinese (or even "authentic" Chinese food in the US) Or are they?

And what was in that Frankie? Frankfurters?

#52 prasantrin

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Posted 12 November 2011 - 02:31 PM

And in the second picture under the Borhi Muhllah section, what are those things that are rolled up? They look like large spring rolls, but I'm guessing they're rolled roti filled with meat? And are the square ones like murtabak?

#53 percyn

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Posted 12 November 2011 - 03:27 PM

I'd like to see some Indian Chinese food. How are the flavours different from American Chinese (or even "authentic" Chinese food in the US) Or are they?

And what was in that Frankie? Frankfurters?

Rona,
Think of a mix of Sichuan (without the Sichuan peppercorns) and Indian flavors. A popular dish is "Manchurian" which consists of a meat or fish or paneer with onions, peppers, garlic, ginger, green chilies, garham masala, soy sauce, etc.

Manchurian Chicken
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Beef
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American Chop suey, a tomato based sweet, sour, spicy sauce over crispy noodles and a fried egg on the left
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As for the Frankie, it was chicken in a spicy sauce, similar to chicken tikka.

Edited by percyn, 12 November 2011 - 03:28 PM.


#54 percyn

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Posted 12 November 2011 - 03:36 PM

And in the second picture under the Borhi Muhllah section, what are those things that are rolled up? They look like large spring rolls, but I'm guessing they're rolled roti filled with meat? And are the square ones like murtabak?

The rolls are "Mutton Rolls", which is also shown in the last picture of the same post. It consists of a thin roti with egg wash, rolled with a goat mince. Unlike a springroll, this was delicate and just melted in your mouth. It was truly delicious and so cheap (less than $1).

The square ones are indeed murtabak, popularly called Beida (egg) roti.

#55 Jenni

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Posted 12 November 2011 - 10:41 PM

Great stuff percyn, keep it coming!

#56 nikkib

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Posted 13 November 2011 - 03:05 AM

Leopalds as mentioned in shantaram right?! Sooo glad you are keeping this blog up percyn!
"Experience is something you gain just after you needed it" ....A Wise man

#57 percyn

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Posted 13 November 2011 - 08:26 AM

Leopalds as mentioned in shantaram right?! Sooo glad you are keeping this blog up percyn!

Yes, the same Leopold's Cafe as featured in Shantaram. I have not met Gregory David Roberts (though it is possible we were at the same venues without being introduced), nor have I read his book, but plan to as he seems like an interesting character.

#58 nikkib

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Posted 13 November 2011 - 10:08 AM

You really should read Shantaram - my sister who was never a big reader literally sat me down and forced me to read it and I'm glad she did. Regardless of how true to life it is, he writes about India beautifully and I'm sure you'd really enjoy it!
"Experience is something you gain just after you needed it" ....A Wise man