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Help for a Couple of Cocktail Novices (Part 1)


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#1 Kerry Beal

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Posted 17 July 2011 - 07:31 AM

So AnnaN and I are up here in the frozen north (well not so frozen - it's plus 30ºC today) and we have decided to start developing a taste for cocktails.

The ingredients we have at our disposal are limited somewhat by our location - so we hoped that by providing a list of our available spirits and such that we could get some suggestions as to what we could make.

Spirits available

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Add ins

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Other potentially necessary stuff - went from no Angostura bitters to two bottles!

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Found a cocktail shaker just yesterday - which will help a lot compared to our previous mixing techniques.

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Also haves - made some gomme syrup this am and have some 1:1 simple syrup made up.

So what do you think - can you suggest some tasty combinations with the stuff we have to work with?

#2 weinoo

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Posted 17 July 2011 - 08:27 AM

Martinis, Manhattans, almost Negronis (Aperol in lieu of Campari), Sidecars, Daiquiris.
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#3 slkinsey

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Posted 17 July 2011 - 08:35 AM

You could make a 20th Century
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#4 weinoo

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Posted 17 July 2011 - 08:42 AM

I've also been drinking Lillet, rocks, with fresh squeezed lime juice, topped off with seltzer. An once again, using Aperol instead of Campari, Americanos might be nice.
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#5 Kerry Beal

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Posted 17 July 2011 - 08:51 AM

You could make a 20th Century

Tell me more.

#6 Kerry Beal

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Posted 17 July 2011 - 08:52 AM

I've also been drinking Lillet, rocks, with fresh squeezed lime juice, topped off with seltzer. An once again, using Aperol instead of Campari, Americanos might be nice.

Sounds refreshing.

#7 Zachary

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Posted 17 July 2011 - 09:00 AM

Kerry,

I'd think about a Pegu Club, subbing Aperol for orange liqueur:

1 1/2 oz gin
3/4 oz Aperol
3/4 oz lime
2 dashes Angostura

Shake, strain, up

The 20th century cocktail is similar...

1 1/2 oz gin
3/4 oz lemon
3/4 oz Lillet Blanc
3/4 oz white creme de cacao

So this ratio is 2:1:1:1 - some people use 3:1:1:1 or even 6:1:1:1. There are versions with only a barspoon of creme de cacao, and one that subs Cocchi Americano for the Lillet..

Thanks,

Zachary

#8 slkinsey

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Posted 17 July 2011 - 09:11 AM


You could make a 20th Century

Tell me more.

It's gin, Lillet blanc, crème de cacao and lemon juice. You can either go 1 1/2 for the gin and 3/4 for everything else (2:1:1:1), or 2 for the gin and 1/2 for everything else (4:1:1:1), or 2 for the gin, 3/4 for the lemon and lillet, and 1/2 for the crème de cacao.
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#9 Kerry Beal

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Posted 17 July 2011 - 09:14 AM

That looks interesting.

Forgot to mention - I do have some Grand Marnier in my cooking stuff - pegu club could use it?

#10 slkinsey

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Posted 17 July 2011 - 09:14 AM

Kerry,

I'd think about a Pegu Club, subbing Aperol for orange liqueur:

1 1/2 oz gin
3/4 oz Aperol
3/4 oz lime
2 dashes Angostura

Shake, strain, up

Won't know until it's tried, but I wouldn't think that Aperol and lime juice would balance at 1:1.

Besides, with Aperol I'd think that the Intro to Aperol is a no-brainer, and it's very approachable for those not experienced in cocktails.

2 oz Aperol
1 oz (Beefeater) Gin
¾ oz Lemon Juice
¼ oz Simple Syrup
1 dash Angostura Bitters
Samuel Lloyd Kinsey

#11 slkinsey

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Posted 17 July 2011 - 09:17 AM

That looks interesting.

Forgot to mention - I do have some Grand Marnier in my cooking stuff - pegu club could use it?

Yes, you could use Grand Marnier as the orange curaçao in a Pegu Club cocktail. But, again, I don't find that it balances with lime juice at 1:1. You will probably have to experiment with ratios to find a balance you like. My PC recipe is usually 2 oz of gin with ¾ oz each of lime juice and Marie Brizard orange curaçao, plus dashes of Angostura and orange bitters. With Grand Marnier in place of the MB curaçao, I'd probably start out by scaling back the lime to 1/2 ounce and see how that does.

Edited by slkinsey, 17 July 2011 - 09:18 AM.

Samuel Lloyd Kinsey

#12 Tri2Cook

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Posted 17 July 2011 - 09:32 AM

I'm not sure what you have in mind but it's been really hot and humid at my end of the province this weekend so I've been leaning towards the cold and refreshing stuff. If you get some ginger beer, you can do a Suffering Bastard. Nothing fancy but it is refreshing. If you grab some fresh mint while getting the ginger beer you can do a Gin Gin Mule, an even more refreshing drink. Another really refreshing drink I tried somewhat recently was the Oaxacan Ice Water. I don't know if using your tequila in place of the mezcal in the original would be as tasty. I think it would because the only mezcal I can get in my area isn't particularly (or at all really) smoky but the drink was still tasty to me. These aren't as fancy or crafty as most of the stuff the experts will mention but they are nice on a hot, sunny day. A trip to the grocery for some juices and maybe a little work with a syrup or two would open up a bunch of stuff from Tiki land as well. :biggrin:
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#13 FrogPrincesse

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Posted 17 July 2011 - 09:47 AM

In addition to the above, here are some other options:

Gimlet is an obvious choice with the Rose lime cordial
Vesper Martini with the Lillet
Tom Collins and John Collins, which are great and refreshing summer drinks
Margarita with the Grand Marnier
Bennett cocktail (gin, lime, simple, Angostura)
Whiskey old-fashioned
Whiskey sour

Edited by FrogPrincesse, 17 July 2011 - 09:48 AM.


#14 JAZ

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Posted 17 July 2011 - 09:50 AM

I've had a couple of versions of something called a Summer Negroni -- equal parts gin, Aperol, and Lillet (or go slightly heavier on the gin, if you like). They're very refreshing; I might like them better than regular Negronis.

#15 Kerry Beal

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Posted 17 July 2011 - 10:21 AM

I've had a couple of versions of something called a Summer Negroni -- equal parts gin, Aperol, and Lillet (or go slightly heavier on the gin, if you like). They're very refreshing; I might like them better than regular Negronis.

Jaz - this was the first recipes I found on eG after we got the Aperol and Lillet - we made another instead with the vermouth - but I definitely have that one on my radar.

#16 Kerry Beal

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Posted 17 July 2011 - 10:22 AM

I'm not sure what you have in mind but it's been really hot and humid at my end of the province this weekend so I've been leaning towards the cold and refreshing stuff. If you get some ginger beer, you can do a Suffering Bastard. Nothing fancy but it is refreshing. If you grab some fresh mint while getting the ginger beer you can do a Gin Gin Mule, an even more refreshing drink. Another really refreshing drink I tried somewhat recently was the Oaxacan Ice Water. I don't know if using your tequila in place of the mezcal in the original would be as tasty. I think it would because the only mezcal I can get in my area isn't particularly (or at all really) smoky but the drink was still tasty to me. These aren't as fancy or crafty as most of the stuff the experts will mention but they are nice on a hot, sunny day. A trip to the grocery for some juices and maybe a little work with a syrup or two would open up a bunch of stuff from Tiki land as well. :biggrin:


It is stinking hot and humid where we are right now - Anna's sitting on the balcony sipping an iced ginger beer right now!

#17 Kerry Beal

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Posted 17 July 2011 - 10:24 AM

In addition to the above, here are some other options:

Gimlet is an obvious choice with the Rose lime cordial
Vesper Martini with the Lillet
Tom Collins and John Collins, which are great and refreshing summer drinks
Margarita with the Grand Marnier
Bennett cocktail (gin, lime, simple, Angostura)
Whiskey old-fashioned
Whiskey sour

The gimlet has been calling - I think it's the real reason I picked up the lime cordial (however Anna has been going on about Lime and Lager since she saw it). It might be the winner tonight - so now a little research for the best recipe.

#18 FrogPrincesse

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Posted 17 July 2011 - 10:43 AM

For the Gimlet, I like the recipe from Joy of Mixology.

2 1/2 gin, 3/4 Rose, lime wedge garnish

#19 slkinsey

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Posted 17 July 2011 - 11:31 AM

I've had a couple of versions of something called a Summer Negroni -- equal parts gin, Aperol, and Lillet (or go slightly heavier on the gin, if you like). They're very refreshing; I might like them better than regular Negronis.

Yael Vengroff had a variation at Pegu Club called the Spring Negroni that was very, very good -- but it was a more complicated affair involving both Bols Genever and dry gin, and both Aperol and Campari.
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#20 EvergreenDan

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Posted 17 July 2011 - 11:35 AM

It's wonderful to see an earnest appeal for advice solicit such good responses. A tribute to eG, I'd say.

How sweet do you like your cocktails? I prefer mine not sweet, so I omit the simple from the Intro to Aperol. It's a delightful cocktail. Also Aperol, seltzer, and lime is refreshing. If you can find a bottle of Campari (which should be easy), mix it with the Aperol for an odd synergy: grapefruit-like flavor. This plus some seltzer and lime to tame the sweet (to your taste) is wonderful and refreshing.

I just returned from Montreal, where Averna (and Campari, but not Aperol) was widely available. It makes a pretty good sub for Ramazzotti in a Paper Airplane (equal parts bourbon, Campari, Ramazzotti, lemon). Aperol would work fine for the Campari (and is in the original Paper Plane (Bourbon, Amaro Nonino, Aperol, lemon). Very refreshing, although perhaps a bit strong for drinking more than a couple.

You can also make a faux Gin and Tonic using Gin, Aperol and seltzer with a wedge of lime -- the Aperol providing the bitter and sweet from the tonic.
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#21 mkayahara

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Posted 17 July 2011 - 11:38 AM

Personally, I usually go with a 2:1 ratio of gin to lime cordial for Gimlets, but mostly because I consider them to be a low-maintenance drink, and I don't want to fight with precise measurements.

Also, if you're willing and able to acquire oranges, you can make a Bronx, then make an Income Tax to see the effect of the Angostura.

And, finally, if you're looking for something to do with the vodka and Kahlua, might I suggest a Black Russian?
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#22 mkayahara

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Posted 17 July 2011 - 11:40 AM


I've had a couple of versions of something called a Summer Negroni -- equal parts gin, Aperol, and Lillet (or go slightly heavier on the gin, if you like). They're very refreshing; I might like them better than regular Negronis.

Yael Vengroff had a variation at Pegu Club called the Spring Negroni that was very, very good -- but it was a more complicated affair involving both Bols Genever and dry gin, and both Aperol and Campari.

And you're gonna leave us hanging like that?
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#23 Tri2Cook

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Posted 17 July 2011 - 12:18 PM

You can use your bourbon, creme de cacao, lemon and grenadine to make a Commodore. Your brandy, grand marnier and dry vermouth to make a Burnt Fuselage. Your gin, sweet vermouth and aperol for a Contessa. Your scotch, lime and ginger beer for a Mamie Taylor. If you had some grapefruit juice, you could use it with your tequila, aperol and lime for a Refuge. With what you have to work with, the problem is going to be less "what can I make" and more how to narrow it down to a reasonable number.
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#24 Kerry Beal

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Posted 17 July 2011 - 12:29 PM

It's wonderful to see an earnest appeal for advice solicit such good responses. A tribute to eG, I'd say.

How sweet do you like your cocktails? I prefer mine not sweet, so I omit the simple from the Intro to Aperol. It's a delightful cocktail. Also Aperol, seltzer, and lime is refreshing. If you can find a bottle of Campari (which should be easy), mix it with the Aperol for an odd synergy: grapefruit-like flavor. This plus some seltzer and lime to tame the sweet (to your taste) is wonderful and refreshing.

I just returned from Montreal, where Averna (and Campari, but not Aperol) was widely available. It makes a pretty good sub for Ramazzotti in a Paper Airplane (equal parts bourbon, Campari, Ramazzotti, lemon). Aperol would work fine for the Campari (and is in the original Paper Plane (Bourbon, Amaro Nonino, Aperol, lemon). Very refreshing, although perhaps a bit strong for drinking more than a couple.

You can also make a faux Gin and Tonic using Gin, Aperol and seltzer with a wedge of lime -- the Aperol providing the bitter and sweet from the tonic.

They don't have to be sweet - but I don't like them to taste raw boozy - I guess what slkinsey calls balanced is what I'm after most.

Was hoping not to add another bottle ie the Campari since this is just a month up north. I think Tri2Cook has it right - it's narrowing down that will be the hard part.

So I'm thinking Pegu Cocktail tomorrow night - just got to decide on the correct amount of lime vs grand marnier.

#25 Kerry Beal

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Posted 17 July 2011 - 02:10 PM



You could make a 20th Century

Tell me more.

It's gin, Lillet blanc, crème de cacao and lemon juice. You can either go 1 1/2 for the gin and 3/4 for everything else (2:1:1:1), or 2 for the gin and 1/2 for everything else (4:1:1:1), or 2 for the gin, 3/4 for the lemon and lillet, and 1/2 for the crème de cacao.

Samuel - how would you describe the taste of this? Sounds like an odd combination.

#26 Tri2Cook

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Posted 17 July 2011 - 03:17 PM

I'm not Samuel but I like the 20th Century. The lemon ties the seemingly strange combination together nicely. It rides along just beneath the surface brightening the herbal flavors and taming the chocolate without killing it. I like the variations on it as well. The 19th Century (bourbon, creme de cacao, lemon, dubonnet rouge) is darker and tastes it but it's a nice take on the original. The 21st Century (tequila, creme de cacao, lemon, absinthe rinse) is my least favorite of the three but I didn't hate it. I just wasn't completely sold on the absinthe rinse. It seemed a bit out of place but that could easily just be my lack of experience showing.
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#27 Kerry Beal

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Posted 17 July 2011 - 03:28 PM

Opted for the gimlet tonight - not my best choice I'd say. Kind of one dimensional - nothing thrilling.

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#28 slkinsey

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Posted 17 July 2011 - 04:01 PM




You could make a 20th Century

Tell me more.

It's gin, Lillet blanc, crème de cacao and lemon juice. You can either go 1 1/2 for the gin and 3/4 for everything else (2:1:1:1), or 2 for the gin and 1/2 for everything else (4:1:1:1), or 2 for the gin, 3/4 for the lemon and lillet, and 1/2 for the crème de cacao.

Samuel - how would you describe the taste of this? Sounds like an odd combination.

That's the beauty of it! You think to yourself, "gin, Lillet, lemon and . . . chocolate?" And that's pretty much the experience you have when drinking it. When it's balanced right, the chocolate kind of sneaks up on you during the finish.
Samuel Lloyd Kinsey

#29 daisy17

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Posted 17 July 2011 - 05:19 PM




You could make a 20th Century

Tell me more.

It's gin, Lillet blanc, crème de cacao and lemon juice. You can either go 1 1/2 for the gin and 3/4 for everything else (2:1:1:1), or 2 for the gin and 1/2 for everything else (4:1:1:1), or 2 for the gin, 3/4 for the lemon and lillet, and 1/2 for the crème de cacao.

Samuel - how would you describe the taste of this? Sounds like an odd combination.


It tastes like delicious.

I would try the gimlet with fresh lime and simple. (2 oz gin, 3/4 lime, 3/4 simple (1:1)) I realize that Rose's is "traditional," but fresh lime is so much better.

#30 Kerry Beal

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Posted 17 July 2011 - 06:02 PM





You could make a 20th Century

Tell me more.

It's gin, Lillet blanc, crème de cacao and lemon juice. You can either go 1 1/2 for the gin and 3/4 for everything else (2:1:1:1), or 2 for the gin and 1/2 for everything else (4:1:1:1), or 2 for the gin, 3/4 for the lemon and lillet, and 1/2 for the crème de cacao.

Samuel - how would you describe the taste of this? Sounds like an odd combination.

That's the beauty of it! You think to yourself, "gin, Lillet, lemon and . . . chocolate?" And that's pretty much the experience you have when drinking it. When it's balanced right, the chocolate kind of sneaks up on you during the finish.

OK - it's on the list.