Jump to content


Welcome to the eG Forums!

These forums are a service of the Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, a 501c3 nonprofit organization dedicated to advancement of the culinary arts. Anyone can read the forums, however if you would like to participate in active discussions please join the Society.

Photo

Candies and sweets:


  • Please log in to reply
7 replies to this topic

#1 Darienne

Darienne
  • participating member
  • 4,719 posts
  • Location:Rolling Hills of Cavan, Ontario

Posted 16 July 2011 - 08:55 AM

Following a thread on Whole Candied Fruit has led to a post on Chocotejas from Peru. Totally new to me. What other countries feature them? They are not listed in Fany Gerson's My Sweet Mexico which doesn't actually preclude them from being Mexican too, I guess.

Has anyone made them? How? What fillings?

Edited by Darienne, 16 July 2011 - 08:57 AM.

Darienne


learn, learn, learn...

Cheers & Chocolates

#2 Panaderia Canadiense

Panaderia Canadiense
  • participating member
  • 2,074 posts
  • Location:Ambato, Ecuador

Posted 16 July 2011 - 09:56 AM

Chocotejas are very popular here, as well. The Ecuadorian version are basically filled chocolates; the best ones I've had were with candied naranjilla and chunks of macadamia.
Elizabeth Campbell, baking 10,000 feet up at 1° South latitude.
My eG Food Blog (2011)My eG Foodblog (2012)

#3 Darienne

Darienne
  • participating member
  • 4,719 posts
  • Location:Rolling Hills of Cavan, Ontario

Posted 16 July 2011 - 10:14 AM

What on earth did we do before Google? Dear PanaCan, never assume that I know what any ingredient is.

I do have two young Calamansi(Kalamansi, Calamondin, Kalamondin...etc) and if I live long enough to have fruit, I'll definitely make Chocotejas with them.

Have you tried making these candies?
Darienne


learn, learn, learn...

Cheers & Chocolates

#4 Panaderia Canadiense

Panaderia Canadiense
  • participating member
  • 2,074 posts
  • Location:Ambato, Ecuador

Posted 16 July 2011 - 11:33 AM

Eek! Sorry - Naranjilla (in Ecuador) or Lulo (in Colombia) are the fruit of Solanum quitoense. They're about the size of a golf ball, rarely larger, with orange skins and green-orange flesh, and zillions of teensly little seeds. The Ecuadorian name translates literally as "little orange" although they're not even remotely related; Naranjilla are cousins of tomatoes. The flavour is very tart and slightly astringent with hints of citrus and a flavour that can only be described as Naranjilla. They're incredibly refreshing when it's hot out.

Ecuadorians use them fresh in juices, as part of the epic Colada Morada, in jams, and they candy the fleshy parts. Colombians make wine with them.

I have indeed made Chocotejas; I don't do it often simply because filled chocolates of this type are a lot of work. I'll produce them by special order, though.

My favourite combination is a Cachaca truffle with cashew nuts and guava pate-de-fruit, although champagne truffle with macadamia and candied orange peels is also excellent, as is black rum truffle with coconut and candied pineapple.

--

On the Candies note, just the guava pate-de-fruit on its own is quite fantastic, if you like guava.
Elizabeth Campbell, baking 10,000 feet up at 1° South latitude.
My eG Food Blog (2011)My eG Foodblog (2012)

#5 Darienne

Darienne
  • participating member
  • 4,719 posts
  • Location:Rolling Hills of Cavan, Ontario

Posted 17 July 2011 - 05:40 AM

Just received your post, PanaCan. Could not access eGullet last night at all.

Had already looked up Naranjilla & Lulo...but then you got me again with Cachaca and Colada Morada. Googled both of them and am up to speed again.

I've never seen Cachaca in the liquor store, but then I've never looked, and if it's available in Ontario, it might just be limited to cities like Toronto. Peterpatch (Peterborough, as it is lovingly called) is a rather provincial city and you often can't find things in it that you can find in Toronto...but then you don't have to live in Toronto either. :raz:

ps. Don't often find guavas either and the cost might be prohibitive. Our daughter, who lives in Toronto, brought me a Dragon fruit last weekend ($2.00 in Chinatown) and I bought one once in Peterpatch ($5).

pps. Looked up Cachaca in the Ontario Liquor board products. Found 7, all from Brazil. Looked up only the top listed one. "Not available in Peterborough.:

Edited by Darienne, 17 July 2011 - 05:46 AM.

Darienne


learn, learn, learn...

Cheers & Chocolates

#6 Tri2Cook

Tri2Cook
  • participating member
  • 3,747 posts
  • Location:Ontario, Canada

Posted 17 July 2011 - 06:29 AM

I recommend going with the Leblon Cachaca. I checked the LCBO site, it is available in Peterborough. I did a great deal of question asking before I added a Cachaca to my cabinet and the overwhelming suggestion was the Leblon from the choices available through the LCBO. I bought it and a bottle of the Pitu (because it is available at my local store, I have to drive an hour to get the Leblon). I'll drive the hour from now on.
It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

#7 Panaderia Canadiense

Panaderia Canadiense
  • participating member
  • 2,074 posts
  • Location:Ambato, Ecuador

Posted 17 July 2011 - 06:50 AM

I use Cachaca 51, which is probably completely unavailable up north. I've also substituted the local original cane aguardiente Zhumir Paute (very much not available outside of Ecuador) when 51 is not on the shelves at my liquor store, and they're comparable. (Aguardiente being neat, slightly aged sugarcane alcohol - the precursor to the types of rum you're familiar with. Cachaca is much the same thing but slightly longer aged - properly done, both liquors should have a complex, almost floral nose and a kick like a burro.)

I just checked the LCBO and I can't believe the prices they're asking for it! 51 is high-end original Cachaca and it's about $7.00 a bottle here. It also looks like they've only got the Colombian Aguardientes, which you should stay away from as they'r all highly flavoured with anise. Yugh.

--

Redirecting to Latin American sweets, I'll be trying to make the local honey-walnut nougat fairly soon, and I'll let y'all know how it goes. Certainly when we enter Colada Morada season (Darienne, I'm surprised you found it - did you find my recipe for it as well?) I'll post about that.
Elizabeth Campbell, baking 10,000 feet up at 1° South latitude.
My eG Food Blog (2011)My eG Foodblog (2012)

#8 Darienne

Darienne
  • participating member
  • 4,719 posts
  • Location:Rolling Hills of Cavan, Ontario

Posted 17 July 2011 - 07:28 AM

Found your recipe for Colada Morada on your blog but don't think it's going to happen here. Interesting tho...

As for Canadian prices for liquor...no one outside of Canada can believe them. I can't figure out how anyone could afford to be an alcoholic in this country.

Look forward to reading about your honey-walnut nougat event. My confectionery partner, Barbara, and I have made mostly Montelimar nougat from Greweling's Chocolates & Confections. Love it.

ps. We do have one large liquor store in Peterborough and shall buy a bottle of Leblon Cachaca post haste. Thanks, Tri2Cook.

Edited by Darienne, 17 July 2011 - 07:29 AM.

Darienne


learn, learn, learn...

Cheers & Chocolates