Jump to content


Welcome to the eG Forums!

These forums are a service of the Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, a 501c3 nonprofit organization dedicated to advancement of the culinary arts. Anyone can read the forums, however if you would like to participate in active discussions please join the Society.

Photo

eG Foodblog: heidih (2011) - A slice of life in the South Bay of Los A

Foodblog

  • This topic is locked This topic is locked
198 replies to this topic

#31 rarerollingobject

rarerollingobject
  • participating member
  • 777 posts
  • Location:Sydney, Australia.

Posted 01 May 2011 - 04:19 AM

Lovely kitchen and garden, Heidi! And I didn't miss the tub of gochujang in your fridge either. :laugh: Looking forward to your blog very much.

#32 Dejah

Dejah
  • participating member
  • 3,307 posts
  • Location:Brandon, Manitoba

Posted 01 May 2011 - 05:32 AM

In the midst of a crazy, absolutely unneccessary winter snow blizzard here in Manitoba, I so needed your blog from sunny California! The splash of sunshine in your first kitchen shot, the grapefruit tree, the views from your kitchen windows all provided the warmth and sunshine that's missing from my windows this weekend. Thanks, Heidi, and I'm looking forward to the week!
Dejah
www.hillmanweb.com

#33 Darienne

Darienne
  • participating member
  • 4,666 posts
  • Location:Rolling Hills of Cavan, Ontario

Posted 01 May 2011 - 05:36 AM

I am, as the British would say, gobsmacked by your photos of your house and garden as always. Now I can't decide whether to fly directly to your house for a week or two, or to cut you completely out of my life because of soul-destroying envy. :raz:

Do you at least have a mat you stand on in front of your sink?

I have two thriving calamansi seedlings in my front window now in the great frozen north...although not as frozen as Brandon Manitoba...and if I live another 25 years I might get a crop.

Blog on, Heidi. I hang on your every word. :wub:
Darienne


learn, learn, learn...

Cheers & Chocolates

#34 LindaK

LindaK
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 2,889 posts
  • Location:Boston, MA

Posted 01 May 2011 - 07:16 AM

Fantastic, Heidi. I am so looking forward to this blog. I'm glad you didn't do this during the depth of winter, I don't think I could have looked at those gorgeous garden pictures without sinking into self-pity.

I hope you'll give us a glimpse of some of the small local grocers and restaurants I've heard you mention. I seem to recall a Japanese bakery and an Indian grocery that had me envious.


 


#35 David Ross

David Ross
  • host
  • 3,346 posts
  • Location:Spokane

Posted 01 May 2011 - 07:30 AM

Heidi, as someone who lives directly North of you, (way North of you where it is still snowing), I have a question about the citrus trees. How long do they bear fruit? Do they have a short season like peaches and pears or do they provide fruit for months?

#36 heidih

heidih
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 10,776 posts
  • Location:Los Angeles

Posted 01 May 2011 - 08:40 AM

Heidi, as someone who lives directly North of you, (way North of you where it is still snowing), I have a question about the citrus trees. How long do they bear fruit? Do they have a short season like peaches and pears or do they provide fruit for months?


Citrus are magical. The fruit can stay on the tree for months and not lose much quality. The tangerines being the exception as they start to lose juiciness. If you pick most of your fruit there will be a gap between crops. The citrus trees were fully loaded around January. I invite neighbors to come and pick, although in this area many of them have their own trees. I would pick the tangerines and perhaps freeze the juice and preserve the peel in some way but the fruit is way high up and if you use a picker with them, they open up at the stem attachment and you have to use them right away. I may borrow a picker this week and see what we come up with. Will be posting some pics in a bit of the trees.

#37 heidih

heidih
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 10,776 posts
  • Location:Los Angeles

Posted 01 May 2011 - 08:42 AM

YAY !!!!!! A South Bay blog ! In some ways, I know that area even better than Long Beach, since I actually spent more TIME there when I was working in Torrance ! I have been at that feed store a million times....they were my regular source for wild bird seed when I was still feeding the birds (before the thug pigeons took over).

The first Thai food I ever ate was at Thai Tiffany on Lomita Blvd. This is going to be so sweet !

There is such a marvelous selection of food outlets in that area, and influences from all over. Go Heidi, I'll be watching with GREAT interest and GREAT nostalgia.


Thai Tiffany is still around (on Pacific Coast Highway at Narbonne). My neighbors like to walk over on the weekend and do the buffet.

I have been going to Lomita Feed since I was a girl. You can't beat the smell of fresh alfalfa hay.

#38 heidih

heidih
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 10,776 posts
  • Location:Los Angeles

Posted 01 May 2011 - 08:54 AM

The bread dough looks happy and is going into the fridge now.
dough.JPG

I picked this baby just now (hazelnut next to it for size reference) Hopefully it will ripen by the end of the week and I will make some guacamole and a salad.
avocado.JPG

My landlord grew the tree from a pit a few years ago. Everyone told him he was a doofus and that it would never bear fruit, that he needed to get a grafted tree from a nursery. Well a number of months ago I noticed some little pea sized fruits and we ended up with 10 of the behemoths. There are a number of huge avocado trees in the area and we have lots of bees so I think whatever pollination had to happen was facilitated by nature. Of course the pit is proportionately sized but there is lots of creamy sweet flesh. I have had one. Two fell and were cracked so I gave them to a neighbor having a party the next day, and several went to the landlord.
Here is the little tree.

Attached Images

  • avo tree.JPG


#39 robirdstx

robirdstx
  • participating member
  • 886 posts
  • Location:Southeast Texas

Posted 01 May 2011 - 09:06 AM

I was just going to ask about avocados. I am so jealous! They are my very favorite food and I would love to have my own tree. Maybe I'll just go ahead and plant the next pit and keep my fingers crossed.

#40 heidih

heidih
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 10,776 posts
  • Location:Los Angeles

Posted 01 May 2011 - 09:07 AM

This is the tangerine tree
tangerine.JPG

The grape vine is looking good. I get really nervous when I prune it way back and it looks like life will never happen again.
grape vine.JPG

The baby grapes are thriving
babygrapes.JPG

As I mentioned in this topic last year, the grapes are seedy but flavorful. I am looking forward to making the syrup again. Looking out the window at the thriving vine I know it will require some pruning in a while and it will be time for stuffed grape leaves.

#41 heidih

heidih
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 10,776 posts
  • Location:Los Angeles

Posted 01 May 2011 - 09:16 AM

Here are just a few more garden shots before I head up the hill to the farmer's market.

Milkweed to attract the monarch butterflies
milkweed.JPG

The only open area that I could vegetable garden in has horrible soil with big chunks of concrete mixed in. I adopted a solution I saw on line to use kiddie pools as instant raised bed gardens. I find them on the curb all the time because people throw them out when they spring a leak. I have four of these going now.
pool gardens.JPG

And just because they make me smile - one of the 40 roses bushes. The first massive flood of blooms is waning and they are getting ready for the next explosion
roses.JPG

#42 Darienne

Darienne
  • participating member
  • 4,666 posts
  • Location:Rolling Hills of Cavan, Ontario

Posted 01 May 2011 - 09:25 AM

[quote name='heidih' timestamp='1304266612' post='1810709']
Here are just a few more garden shots before I head up the hill to the farmer's market.

Milkweed to attract the monarch butterflies
milkweed.JPG

I don't understand. Which are the milkweed? Could your milkweed look that different from ours in East Central Ontario?

Just looked at the googled images and apparently it can and does...
Darienne


learn, learn, learn...

Cheers & Chocolates

#43 heidih

heidih
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 10,776 posts
  • Location:Los Angeles

Posted 01 May 2011 - 12:36 PM

Back from the farmers market. It is hot today - expected high of 82.

Coming into the market
FM.JPG

One of the stands I like- it was already 11 am and hot so things are a bit picked over and droopy. They label "organic" but do not display a certificate
organic.JPG

Japanese greens
Japanese.JPG

The best Fuji apples and super nice farmers
Fuji.JPG

The Crepe stand - they do a rip roaring business with the young families - serving both sweet and savory crepes. I caught them in a lull
crepes1.JPG
crepes2.JPG

#44 heidih

heidih
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 10,776 posts
  • Location:Los Angeles

Posted 01 May 2011 - 12:45 PM

More Farmer's Market

Chicken on the grill
chicken.JPG

Inside view of the big kettle corn vat- he does about 50 to 75 pounds of seed at this small market- every little kid is clutching a bag
kettlecorn.JPG

The most unusual mandarins I have ever seen. They are really bumpy. The flesh is a deep orange, firm, and very sweet. I think I prefer a bit more tang in mine, but I can see these as a hit
mandarins.JPG

I picked up some opaka from this fish vendor
fish.JPG

#45 heidih

heidih
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 10,776 posts
  • Location:Los Angeles

Posted 01 May 2011 - 12:51 PM

And more FM

These guys are so charming - their comments are peppered with French words - one would buy from them without tasting the product. Their product is fresh and lively and lovely. I could live off an assortment of it in the summer along with fresh corn and tomatoes.
babaguy.JPG babaproduct.JPG
I could smell these deep red strawberries from several stands away
berries.JPG

This stand sells citrus and specializes in large bags of juice oranges. They are at the edge of the market so that people can just drive up and have them loaded into their cars
oranges.JPG

#46 heidih

heidih
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 10,776 posts
  • Location:Los Angeles

Posted 01 May 2011 - 01:22 PM

This is another of my favorite stands. The young woman is very enthusiastic about their produce. A few years ago she got me started on cooking fat green beans until just tender in salted water and dipping them in mayo mixed with a bit of soy. Her grandmother served them to the kids as a snack. The beans are not trimmed so the water does not seep in. Clever, simple and delicious. In the first shot she is trying to whisk a stray plastic bag away so as not to detract from the vegetables.
sweetie.JPG
sweetie2.JPG

This stand has a fantastically fresh and varied selection of produce focusing on "Asian" ingredients. They farm in Fresno and came down to Los Angeles early yesterday for the Torrance Farmers Market, and stay the second day for this one. That is one long drive. I am in awe of the hard work these farmers do.
Asian1.JPG
Asian2.JPG
Asian3.JPG

#47 heidih

heidih
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 10,776 posts
  • Location:Los Angeles

Posted 01 May 2011 - 01:33 PM

I plucked off some wild fennel the other day on a walk and that scent memory has been haunting me. I kept thinking about the fennel fronds with seafood. Since I picked up some fish at the farmer's market, I decided to stop at a trail well off the road and gather some for tonight.
fennel.JPG

I also stopped to get a shot of one of the big old avocado trees in the 'hood
bigavo.JPG

And here is the haul from the market
haul.JPG

The list is green garlic (kinda mature- I missed the baby ones), green onions, little beets with their tops, cauliflower, fava beans (also on the mature side), a bag of baby kale, Japanese cucumbers, a container of taboulie from the cute guys, as well as something they called a layered dip consisting of feta, sun dried tomato, pesto made with walnuts, parsley, basil, oregano and olive oil. It is really good.

I have been munching on tastes of the taboulie (very fresh, light and heavily weighted on the parsley end), and the "dip" with some broken bits of baked pita. I will admit to also picking up a passion iced tea from Starbucks to carry me through the outing.

#48 hsm

hsm
  • participating member
  • 315 posts

Posted 01 May 2011 - 01:42 PM

Thanks for the therapeutic trip to the market, from chilly, grey Chicago. Those greens and daikon from the Asian farmers look amazing. :wub:

#49 heidih

heidih
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 10,776 posts
  • Location:Los Angeles

Posted 01 May 2011 - 01:55 PM

Thanks for the therapeutic trip to the market, from chilly, grey Chicago. Those greens and daikon from the Asian farmers look amazing. :wub:


The greens really are wonderful. I have to rein myself in at the market. That is one of the things I wanted to discuss on this blog - using what you buy. There was a time when I would come home with so much produce that there was no way to use it to good effect before it lost its vitality. Today I am committed to using everything I purchase. I will be posting a list of my proposed dishes in a bit. I usually cook or prep everything within a day or two. A super fresh well cooked vegetable reheated is better to me than a geriatric vegetable prepped well past its prime. PLUS - there will a farmstand to visit in the next day or two, as well as some vibrant produce at some Asian markets.

#50 heidih

heidih
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 10,776 posts
  • Location:Los Angeles

Posted 01 May 2011 - 01:59 PM

The first teaser shot showed iced tea in a vintage pitcher so I thought I would address my iced tea. It is my all day beverage. Several years ago I picked up a brewing method from a friend that is simple and works for me. I nuke a cup of water in a pyrex measuring cup and then add 4 to 6 tea bags, depending on the type. Today I used 3 bags of the Safeway brand black tea and 2 of Bigelow Perfect Peach. I let it steep for a few minutes, again depending on the tea, pour into the pitcher and fill with water from the tap. As summer approaches I will have different flavors going in pitchers. Anyone an iced tea fiend?

#51 heidih

heidih
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 10,776 posts
  • Location:Los Angeles

Posted 01 May 2011 - 02:19 PM

I think it is well past time to get cooking! Here are my thoughts on using what I bought as well as the minimal bits I have to use up in the fridge.

Beet Greens: In a Thai style soup with coconut milk, ginger, serrano chiles, the last bit of turkey from Easter, fish sauce, turkey stock, and some shirataki noodles. Maybe some Korean hot pepper paste to meet the earthiness of the greens. Other spices will be on deck

Beets: I tend to nuke whole, then peel and roast if they need more flavor concentration. I have been craving a creamy horseradish sauce (sure I saw it on eGullet). I hate to pick up a whole jar of horseradish- part of my using what I buy. But I have a tube of wasabi so I may pick up some Greek yogurt tomorrow and make up something. I like to snack on the beets slightly warmed (yes I really really use my microwave) with some of the cold sauce.

Cauliflower- this one was not my wisest choice but I plan on some vegetarian Indian take out later in the week. It is steam table and I generally get saag paneer and a chickpea dal. I plan on some vegetable laden cornbread with it so I am open to suggestions.

Green onion: I have a bit of pineapple left from Easter so I am going to dice it up with the onion, cilantro, fresh chile and ???

Cucumbers: Into a bowl with salt, sugar (Splenda) black pepper, orange juice and vinegar - this will need several days to come together

Green garlic: the stem will go into the soup above and the garlic if not too strong will be incorporated into the fish dish

Baby kale: I am going to chop and toss with orange juice, some of that feta/pesto/dried tomato dip I mentioned above along with more olive oil. That will keep for days and maybe improve with age.

Dinner idea is forming....along with the fava bean prep

#52 PopsicleToze

PopsicleToze
  • participating member
  • 944 posts

Posted 01 May 2011 - 02:25 PM

The first teaser shot showed iced tea in a vintage pitcher so I thought I would address my iced tea. It is my all day beverage. Several years ago I picked up a brewing method from a friend that is simple and works for me. I nuke a cup of water in a pyrex measuring cup and then add 4 to 6 tea bags, depending on the type. Today I used 3 bags of the Safeway brand black tea and 2 of Bigelow Perfect Peach. I let it steep for a few minutes, again depending on the tea, pour into the pitcher and fill with water from the tap. As summer approaches I will have different flavors going in pitchers. Anyone an iced tea fiend?


Great pictures and report from the market, Heidi. Everything looked wonderful. I'm amazed by the huge avocado tree, too, and the wild fennel. Never heard of the fish you bought, so I'm really looking forward to seeing how you cook it.

Huge fan of iced tea, too. I've almost eliminated Diet Coke from my life now that I take the time to make iced tea everyday.

#53 Pam R

Pam R
  • manager
  • 6,837 posts
  • Location:Winnipeg, Canada

Posted 01 May 2011 - 02:34 PM

Anyone an iced tea fiend?

Yes. :wink:

Like Dejah, I woke up to snow on the lawn, and a good few inches of heavy snow to clean off my car. What a treat to see the farmer's market -- it's the thing I'm most envious of you southern dwellers. I don't mind the cool temperatures up here (most of the time) but I hate the shorter growing seasons and the fact that our short farmer's market season rarely has the produce variety we get to see in your pictures.

#54 rarerollingobject

rarerollingobject
  • participating member
  • 777 posts
  • Location:Sydney, Australia.

Posted 01 May 2011 - 02:53 PM

Beets: I tend to nuke whole, then peel and roast if they need more flavor concentration. I have been craving a creamy horseradish sauce (sure I saw it on eGullet). I hate to pick up a whole jar of horseradish- part of my using what I buy. But I have a tube of wasabi so I may pick up some Greek yogurt tomorrow and make up something. I like to snack on the beets slightly warmed (yes I really really use my microwave) with some of the cold sauce.


So funny you say this! I leapt upon a fresh horseradish root when I saw it in a shop yesterday and have been pondering ever since what I'm going to do with it. Beef is obvious, but I was actually thinking in bed last night about using it with beetroots, either grated fresh over a beetroot carpaccio type thing, or as some kind of sauce..can't wait to see what you do with yours.

I've never microwaved a beetroot, how long do you reckon you blast it, and at what temp?

#55 heidih

heidih
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 10,776 posts
  • Location:Los Angeles

Posted 01 May 2011 - 03:19 PM

I've never microwaved a beetroot, how long do you reckon you blast it, and at what temp?


I put them in a covered glass dish with just a splash of water and start out at two minutes. Then I let them sit awhile to let the residual cooking happen and then give them a poke with a sharp knife and go from there.

As to horseradish- oh my - I have not used fresh since childhood. I have a friend who had a bunch growing and her gardener dug them up.......but they came back so maybe this year. Our traditional horseradish sauce was the grated root simmered with a bit of vinegar. Then it was mixed with sour cream and seasoned with salt and sugar to taste. It needed to sit a while to mellow and then we re-seasoned.

#56 heidih

heidih
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 10,776 posts
  • Location:Los Angeles

Posted 01 May 2011 - 03:29 PM

The pineapple has been dealt with - cut up in smaller bits with some cucumber, green onion, Meyer lemon juice, dried cranberry, sushi ginger (my Korean market makes their own and it does not have that chemical taste), serrano chile, tomato, and fish sauce. It is more of a salad than a salsa and I will add some fresh mint when serving.
salsa.JPG

The cucumbers are sitting out to release some juices before they get finalized. They have salt, pepper, Splenda, Meyer lemon juice, orange juice and rice vinegar as the liquid.
cukes.JPG

#57 JAZ

JAZ
  • manager
  • 4,901 posts
  • Location:Atlanta

Posted 01 May 2011 - 03:39 PM

Here's a recipe I've used for beets (and the greens) with horseradish cream sauce. It's great: Beets with horseradish sauce.

#58 heidih

heidih
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 10,776 posts
  • Location:Los Angeles

Posted 01 May 2011 - 03:54 PM

I am off to the Japanese market to get shirataki noodles. We have a great konnyaku topic here.

#59 heidih

heidih
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 10,776 posts
  • Location:Los Angeles

Posted 01 May 2011 - 05:05 PM

I want to share a story about my food loving neighbors. The two women are best friends and live next door to one another. Yesterday they stopped as they were driving by to chat and related that they had spent some time trying to locate fresh raspberries as Win's mother in law wanted homemade raspberry jam for her birthday. They actually got enough to make a small batch. By the time I walked over hours later the pretty jars had all popped. The KitchenAid was going full speed as she was making layers of cake that would become a neopolitan cake (vanilla, chocolate and strawberry) - not sure what fillings. I smelled something nice and smoky - she had two turkeys in the smoker for the party today. Now these are my people! Isn't it cool when you find folks who "get" your food enjoyment?

#60 Kim Shook

Kim Shook
  • participating member
  • 2,953 posts
  • Location:Richmond, VA

Posted 01 May 2011 - 05:09 PM

Gorgeous farmer’s market. I live in the south, but my town just doesn’t have a really great market. And I love the sound of those cucumbers. We have a bowl of them going in the fridge all summer long, but I’ve never thought to add OJ – that is a great idea!





Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: Foodblog