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Bonal Gentiane-Quina


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55 replies to this topic

#31 Rafa

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Posted 01 April 2013 - 07:10 AM

Haven't tried it yet, but this looks good...

 

 

by Leo Robitschek, Eleven Madison Mark, NYC.
2 oz Bonal Gentiane Quina
1/2 oz Peychaud's Bitters
1/4 oz Maraschino Liqueur
1/2 oz Lemon juice
1 twst Lemon peel
 
Dry shake and pour into a sugar-rimmed, curshed ice-filled cocktail glass. Lemon peel garnish.

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”In Demerara some of the rum producers have a unique custom of placing chunks of raw meat in the casks to assist in aging, to absorb certain impurities, and to add a certain distinctive character.” -Peter Valaer, "Foreign and Domestic Rum," 1937


#32 FrogPrincesse

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Posted 02 April 2013 - 10:45 AM

The Municipality: rye, Bonal, Averna, orange bitters, orange zest (expressed then discarded).

There is potential there but the finish is not quite right.

 

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#33 FrogPrincesse

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Posted 31 July 2013 - 09:21 AM

I created something based on the Corpse Reviver No. 2 for MxMo LXXV ("Flip Flop!"), You Only Live Twice with rye & Bonal. Here is the original on the left and the twist on the right. It worked out well. I need to use my Bonal more often.

 

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#34 FrogPrincesse

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Posted 22 November 2013 - 11:55 AM

Speaking of Bonal, last night I tried Jeff Hollinger's Whimsy Shim. Bonal as the base, with dry vermouth and Calvados to up the flavor and richness, bitters (I went with Miracle Mile forbidden bitters).

 

He says you can use half Lillet half Carpano Antica and a dash of bitters, if you don't have Bonal.

 

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#35 Rafa

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Posted 22 November 2013 - 03:28 PM

Sounds good. Where's the recipe? 

 

Nice twist btw.


Edited by Rafa, 22 November 2013 - 03:28 PM.

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”In Demerara some of the rum producers have a unique custom of placing chunks of raw meat in the casks to assist in aging, to absorb certain impurities, and to add a certain distinctive character.” -Peter Valaer, "Foreign and Domestic Rum," 1937


#36 FrogPrincesse

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Posted 01 December 2013 - 08:17 PM

Sounds good. Where's the recipe? 
 
Nice twist btw.

Thanks Rafa, I try.

The recipe was from The Art of Shim by Dinah Sanders.

1.5 oz Bonal
1 oz Dolin dry vermouth (I used Noilly Prat)
0.5 oz calvados
Dash aromatic bitters
Lemon peel

#37 Rafa

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Posted 01 December 2013 - 08:34 PM

Thanks. That's at the top of my cocktail book to-buy list. 


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”In Demerara some of the rum producers have a unique custom of placing chunks of raw meat in the casks to assist in aging, to absorb certain impurities, and to add a certain distinctive character.” -Peter Valaer, "Foreign and Domestic Rum," 1937


#38 FrogPrincesse

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Posted 01 December 2013 - 08:54 PM

Tonight I had a Bicycle Thief, a Manhattan variation & close relative of the Little Italy, with rye (I used Rittenhouse 101), sweet vermouth (Cocchi vermouth di Torino), Cynar, and Bonal. Great showcase for the Rittenhouse rye, with a lovely bitter orange flavor, plus caramel and herbs in the finish. I did not do a side-by-side, but purely from memory, I think I may prefer it to a Little Italy.

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#39 FrogPrincesse

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Posted 04 March 2014 - 10:20 AM

Not enough Bonal love. I am still working on the same bottle which, miraculously, still tastes fine (I keep it in the fridge and purge the headspace after every use with inert gas).

 

Yesterday I was looking for rye + Bonal combos and was every excited to find a recipe that also includes falernum. With homemade falernum this is great. A very aromatic, somewhat tropical Manhattan, with orange and spice notes and a long finish. I only used 1/4 ounces of falernum because the homemade stuff (Elmegirab recipe) is very concentrated. I added 1/8 oz of simple to compensate for the decreased amount of falernum, but it did not really need it.

 

No. 65: rye (Bulleit), Bonal, falernum (homemade), Angostura and orange (Fee) bitters.

 

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Edited by FrogPrincesse, 04 March 2014 - 10:20 AM.

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#40 FrogPrincesse

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Posted 08 April 2014 - 12:14 PM

As Wine Stands Time (Kirk Estopinal) with 1oz each High West Son of a Bourye, Bonal gentiane-quina, Cynar, and a grapefruit twist (which is supposed to be discarded). Very nice aperitif. The recipe specifies rye and the "bourye" was a little sweet for this, so I would stick to rye.

 

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#41 FrogPrincesse

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Posted 21 May 2014 - 03:21 PM

L'Iguana by Rafa, with 1 oz each Smith & Cross, Cynar, Bonal, 1/4 oz lemon juice and a pinch of salt, swizzle-style.

It's bitter and slightly winey. Lots of caramel from the S&C and Cynar.

 

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#42 Rafa

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Posted 22 May 2014 - 09:20 AM

I too found it very caramel-y last time I made it (which is sort of what I was going for originally, but still). I thought it could benefit from something lighter--I tried Wray & Nephew in place of the S&C, which worked somewhat. As it is I would make it for someone who likes very dark flavors. 

 

Thank you for keeping this thread alive and reminding me that I need to use my Bonal more. I've found that it adds bitterness and interest in drinks where Pineau des Charentes is called for, as it's basically a bittered and aromatized Pineau-type aperitif (lightly fermented grape must + brandy, barrel-aged). 


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”In Demerara some of the rum producers have a unique custom of placing chunks of raw meat in the casks to assist in aging, to absorb certain impurities, and to add a certain distinctive character.” -Peter Valaer, "Foreign and Domestic Rum," 1937


#43 FrogPrincesse

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Posted 22 May 2014 - 09:57 AM

I too found it very caramel-y last time I made it (which is sort of what I was going for originally, but still). I thought it could benefit from something lighter--I tried Wray & Nephew in place of the S&C, which worked somewhat. As it is I would make it for someone who likes very dark flavors. 

 

I was in the mood for dark flavors that night so it worked for me.

 

Thank you for keeping this thread alive and reminding me that I need to use my Bonal more. I've found that it adds bitterness and interest in drinks where Pineau des Charentes is called for, as it's basically a bittered and aromatized Pineau-type aperitif (lightly fermented grape must + brandy, barrel-aged).

You are welcome, and thanks for the tip. I am now scouting the Kindred Cocktails database for drinks with Pineau des Charentes so I can try them with Bonal...



#44 Rafa

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Posted 22 May 2014 - 10:29 AM

I think it works well in a Pompadour riff, with the Martinique rhum cut with Jamaican rum to play off its affinity for Bonal. Something like:

 

1 1/2 oz Bonal Gentiane Quina
3/4 oz Rhum Agricole
3/4 oz Jamaican rum
1/4 oz Lemon juice (or more to taste)
1-2 dash Bittermens Xocolatl Mole
Lemon twist.

This is basically a Pompadour crossed with slkinsey's equal parts Bonal/Smith & Cross drink from upthread. 

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”In Demerara some of the rum producers have a unique custom of placing chunks of raw meat in the casks to assist in aging, to absorb certain impurities, and to add a certain distinctive character.” -Peter Valaer, "Foreign and Domestic Rum," 1937


#45 FrogPrincesse

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Posted 22 May 2014 - 10:39 AM

Perfect. I know what I am having tonight!



#46 tanstaafl2

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Posted 22 May 2014 - 02:38 PM

Thank you for keeping this thread alive and reminding me that I need to use my Bonal more. I've found that it adds bitterness and interest in drinks where Pineau des Charentes is called for, as it's basically a bittered and aromatized Pineau-type aperitif (lightly fermented grape must + brandy, barrel-aged). 

 

I regularly sub Bonal for sweet vermouth to good effect but I don't think I ever quite made the connection to that ambrosia of the gods, Pineau des Charentes, and the other vin de liqueurs. I think I am going to have to explore that Pompadour riff this weekend!


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#47 FrogPrincesse

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Posted 23 May 2014 - 11:51 AM

 

I think it works well in a Pompadour riff, with the Martinique rhum cut with Jamaican rum to play off its affinity for Bonal. Something like:

 

1 1/2 oz Bonal Gentiane Quina
3/4 oz Rhum Agricole
3/4 oz Jamaican rum
1/4 oz Lemon juice (or more to taste)
1-2 dash Bittermens Xocolatl Mole
Lemon twist.

This is basically a Pompadour crossed with slkinsey's equal parts Bonal/Smith & Cross drink from upthread. 

 

 

I tried it. The Bonal and lemon juice (I used 1/4 oz) managed to overwhelm the two beautiful rums I used (Saint James Hors d'Age and Appleton 12). So, I don't know, maybe someone should try with less Bonal and report. :wink:

 

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Edited by FrogPrincesse, 23 May 2014 - 11:51 AM.


#48 Rafa

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Posted 23 May 2014 - 12:10 PM

Oh dear. Not surprised that those lovely, subtle rums got clobbered by Bonal. I was thinking more Smith & Cross than Appleton's. Sorry to mislead!


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”In Demerara some of the rum producers have a unique custom of placing chunks of raw meat in the casks to assist in aging, to absorb certain impurities, and to add a certain distinctive character.” -Peter Valaer, "Foreign and Domestic Rum," 1937


#49 FrogPrincesse

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Posted 23 May 2014 - 12:22 PM

Oops. S&C vs. Appleton - two completely different beasts of course...

 

I am curious to see what tanstaafl2 comes up with over the weekend.



#50 tanstaafl2

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Posted 26 May 2014 - 08:51 AM

Oops. S&C vs. Appleton - two completely different beasts of course...
 
I am curious to see what tanstaafl2 comes up with over the weekend.


Finally got a chance to play a little last night. First I started with the baseline above with St. James Hors d'Age and Appleton 12. A very pleasant drink but the rums did indeed seem to get a bit lost under the thumb of the Bonal.

Then I moved on to a version with St. James but subbed the S&C for the Appleton. Definitely an improvement that gives the rum a fighting chance and seemed to bring the drink into better balance.

Finally I kept the S&C but exchanged Depaz for the St James. It is younger and a bit more "brash" than the older and more subtle St. James Hors d'Age in my opinion and seemed like it might be a good fit here. I thought it worked the best. Not a huge difference but it worked for me.

Bonal Pompadour riff edited.jpg

Not a drink for a subtle spirit to be sure!
If you pick up a starving dog and make him prosperous, he will not bite you. This is the principal difference between a dog and a man. ~Mark Twain

Some people are like a Slinky. They are not really good for anything, but you still can't help but smile when you shove them down the stairs...
~tanstaafl2

#51 FrogPrincesse

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Posted 30 May 2014 - 02:28 PM

Continuing to play with my Bonal. Uffizi (Will Thompson) with Bonal, Cocchi Americano, white grapefruit juice, salt rim (I went with a thin half rim). It's a very nice lightweight aperitif. The Bonal and Cocchi Americano played well together, and even though there was a good dose of juice, it still tasted interesting. A good drink to start the weekend.

 

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#52 EvergreenDan

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Posted 22 June 2014 - 04:11 PM

I tried Rafa's creation with Smith & Cross and Rhum JM Blanc. Really excellent, although next time I would skew the rums toward the agricole to give it more of a chance against the Smith & Cross -- maybe 1oz agricole to 1/2 oz Smith & Cross. Lovely, lovely drink. Needs a name.


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#53 Rafa

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Posted 23 June 2014 - 09:35 AM

Needs a name.

 

I'm open to suggestions. Names for hairstyles, preferably, though the working title is Troubadour, simply because it looks similar and isn't taken. 


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”In Demerara some of the rum producers have a unique custom of placing chunks of raw meat in the casks to assist in aging, to absorb certain impurities, and to add a certain distinctive character.” -Peter Valaer, "Foreign and Domestic Rum," 1937


#54 Kerry Beal

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Posted 23 June 2014 - 02:34 PM



I'm open to suggestions. Names for hairstyles, preferably, though the working title is Troubadour, simply because it looks similar and isn't taken. 

Quiff.


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#55 FrogPrincesse

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Posted 08 July 2014 - 04:28 PM

I'm open to suggestions. Names for hairstyles, preferably, though the working title is Troubadour, simply because it looks similar and isn't taken. 

 

I see that you've named it the Bona Drag. Nice.


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#56 Rafa

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Posted 17 July 2014 - 01:33 PM

I see that you've named it the Bona Drag. Nice.

 

I find much of Morrissey's persona/opinions to be, well, a drag, but true to Kerry's suggestion upthread the dude rocks a quiff, and tends to have many hair-themed songs, and I can't ignore the Bonal/Bona thing. Plus Suedehead is a jam. 


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”In Demerara some of the rum producers have a unique custom of placing chunks of raw meat in the casks to assist in aging, to absorb certain impurities, and to add a certain distinctive character.” -Peter Valaer, "Foreign and Domestic Rum," 1937