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King Hsuan Oolong


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#1 baroness

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Posted 12 April 2011 - 09:46 AM

I picked up a 'tin' (round tube with two vacuum-packed bricks within) of JustMake King Hsuan Oolong, a semi-fermented formosa tea recently. The literature included the chart below, with suggested amounts of leaf and steeping times. However, there is no indication of the amount of WATER.
Any ideas?

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#2 Will

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Posted 12 April 2011 - 12:17 PM

I wouldn't put too much stock in brewing directions of this sort, whether or not volume of water is included. Looks like this is a Jin Xuan style oolong.

These amounts of tea are fairly small to do so many infusions. What size brewing vessel are you planning on using for this tea?

#3 mbhank

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Posted 12 April 2011 - 12:44 PM

It's somewhat standard to use a heaping tsp. of the tea to 6-8 oz, of water. I usually steep for 3-5 minutes or until the color is what I like.
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#4 Will

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Posted 12 April 2011 - 12:59 PM

It's somewhat standard to use a heaping tsp. of the tea to 6-8 oz, of water. I usually steep for 3-5 minutes or until the color is what I like.

Measuring tea by volume is difficult, because tea varies so much in terms of shape, leaf size, etc. Given that this is an oolong which is probably in a tight fist / ball shape, generic "one-size-fits-all" brewing instructions may not work that well. And with larger, more wire-shaped teas, using a heaping tsp will not give nearly enough leaf, even if brewing western style (less leaf, longer infusion times).

If I had to guess, I would say that the instructions are probably for about 100 ml of water.

#5 baroness

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Posted 13 April 2011 - 05:57 AM

I brewed my first pot 'western' style - 9 grams/2 rounded tsp. of leaves to about 450 ml of water for 4 min.
The leaves were green and indeed in a tight fist shape when dry, but almost fully opened during steeping.

The liquor was pale but very aromatic. Delicious!!! tea, with floral notes and a slight toasty base. Now I can see why the booklet included times for multiple infusions. I'll try that soon.

According to their literature, this is a fairly new tea:
"King Hsuan, also named Formosa Tea No. Twelve, is one of the revolutionary new varieties of tea plants formulated in 1981. It has become famous for its uniquely smooth, sweet, fragrant flavor married with a traditional refreshing aroma. It has a cool, silky texture. Semi-fermented and unscented, King Hsuan draws and extraordinary refreshing flavor. It is masterful integration of modern cultivation and nature."

I'm impressed with the quality/price ratio and will most likely try other teas of this brand.

#6 Richard Kilgore

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Posted 14 April 2011 - 05:45 PM

Where did you find these Oolongs, baroness?

#7 baroness

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Posted 16 April 2011 - 06:51 AM

Richard, I found them in a local Asian supermarket. No matter where I shop, I check out the tea department!

BTW, I re-steeped the leaves that I'd used 'western' style and found the second steeping wonderful as well.
So, I picked up their Tung Ding and another package of the King Hsuan. I'll be looking for the rest of their line.

#8 DjLau

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Posted 21 October 2011 - 02:04 PM

That's a pretty cool line of teas. I agree with the brewing instructions also. The 1st steep needs up to 1.5 min in some cases for the leaves to fully open.

A very short second steep allows the subtleties of Oolong's to be fully displayed.