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Help, I need to buy a real pro shaker


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#61 JoNorvelleWalker

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Posted 11 November 2013 - 10:00 PM

I wrote Cocktail Kingdom to check on the availability of the stainless version of the Yukiwa Baron.  I don't foresee much shaking drinks for more than one (me), although I may want larger volume concoctions such as eggnog, for which I assume a 500 ml shaker is sufficient.



#62 Adam George

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Posted 12 November 2013 - 06:35 AM

Uh... You had to tempt me with that glass Yarai Shaker again... must resist.

Anyway, in the bar, with partially thawing ice a 500ml shaker is not big enough. You may get away with it at home with ice from the freezer.

I've never seen that Deluxe Shaker in person, but you can see by the side by side photos that it is wider further down the body, whereas the Baron is slimmer. For that reason I favour the Baron.

However, if you're short on barware, I'd recommend the Koriko tins paired with their Fine Strainer - which is excellent - and either an AG Hawthorn - the best of its type - or a CK Julep Strainer, which will allow you to throw drinks between tins.

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#63 JoNorvelleWalker

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Posted 12 November 2013 - 10:09 AM

Cocktail Kingdom let me know that they will no longer be carrying the Yukiwa Baron.



#64 slkinsey

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Posted 12 November 2013 - 01:18 PM

. . . Glass is a better insulator than stainless . . .

 

I'm not sure I understand your point here.  Glass does have much lower thermal conductivity than metal.  But, much more importantly in making cocktails, a typical glass mixing vessel has a much higher thermal capacity than a typical metal mixing vessel.  This is a disadvantage if the vessel will be used at room temperature because glass will transfer more thermal energy into the drink, or an advantage if the vessel will be frozen because the glass will absorb thermal energy from the drink.  Typically, stirring pitchers are frozen and shakers are used at room temperature.  This is among the many good reasons not to use a glass shaker.


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#65 Adam George

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Posted 12 November 2013 - 01:46 PM

Exactly, in an ideal world, you're chilling either mixing vessel.
In the bar we chill our shakers and mixing glasses and you'd be able to do the same at home, to greater effect. If you were going to choose one material over the other and titanium or such is out of your price range, glass would seem like the preference, provided you planned ahead by ten minutes to freeze your equipment.
I however do not like shaking in glass because thermal capacity aside, I don't like how cumbersome and heavy glass boston shakers are.

I could get used to that Yarai glass cobbler though....yum.

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#66 JoNorvelleWalker

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Posted 25 November 2013 - 08:24 PM

This afternoon I took delivery of my Yukiwa Baron shaker, in plain silver finish.  I don't go in for gold and all that bling (well, except maybe in small amounts as earrings, but that's a different weakness).  I purchased the Yukiwa from Kayoko of umamimart in Oakland, California.  I cannot say too many good things about the service I received.  I am in New Jersey and the package made it here across the continent over the weekend.

 

http://shop.umamimart.com/pages/about

 

 

During tonight's mixology session the shaker stayed together when it was supposed to, yet came apart easily when it was time.  It did not leak.  I was quite pleased, having in the past been denied my drink when I couldn't get the wretched screw lid off the canning jar.  If there is one fault I could find with the Yukiwa, it becomes quite cold -- painfully frigid, I might add.  Does anyone make such a thing as a cobbler cozy?  Or do people shake with potholders?

 

Note umamimart also offers a yarai glass cobbler shaker, not that I'd expect that anyone were interested.



#67 campus five

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Posted 26 November 2013 - 10:37 AM

That's how you can tell it's done.

#68 Adam George

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Posted 28 November 2013 - 07:43 AM

That's actually the best thing about the cobbler.

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#69 JoNorvelleWalker

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Posted 29 November 2013 - 04:01 PM

One thing to consider about glassware for shaking:  until I got the Baron I had been using Bormioli Rocco canning jars for mixing.  Today I gently swirled one of the jars to mix a non-alcoholic concoction for my breakfast -- and the bottom fell out.  (This after having cleaned the kitchen last night.)

 

It could well have been my mai tai.



#70 JoNorvelleWalker

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Posted 14 December 2013 - 07:11 PM

A disadvantage of my Yukiwa Baron -- the only disadvantage I have found -- is that it tends to tarnish.  Very sad.  I like the shaker so much it seems like I have had it forever, however looking at the calendar I see it's lived here less than three weeks.  Though it has been in essentially daily use.

 

Maybe I should avoid using the Baron for egg based drinks?  With non-egg drinks I have just been carefully rinsing it with hot water between uses, sometimes wiping it dry and sometimes letting it air dry.  Maybe I should start a thread about care and feeding of a real pro shaker?



#71 slkinsey

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Posted 15 December 2013 - 08:37 AM

Tarnish?  Stainless steel shouldn't/doesn't tarnish.  What are you seeing?  Maybe you can post a picture.


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#72 JoNorvelleWalker

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Posted 15 December 2013 - 03:15 PM

Tarnish?  Stainless steel shouldn't/doesn't tarnish.  What are you seeing?  Maybe you can post a picture.

 

I was seeing silver sulfide.  I'd post a picture but I spent a good bit of time yesterday getting rid of the tarnish by the electrochemical method using a water bath of aluminum and baking soda.  I was afraid this process might dull the Baron's mirror finish, but I can report that all is well, and my mai tai came out fine last night.

 

I'm looking for advice on how to care for the shaker so that it hopefully does not tarnish again so fast.  Yes, stainless steel would have been an option, but if a plain stainless steel Baron exists for sale anywhere in the US, I don't know how to find it.  And not for want of trying.

 

Silver was not my first choice, but I must say it is beautiful (you can see the Baron in a couple of pictures I posted in the drinks thread) and silver surfaces are antimicrobial which stainless steel surfaces are not.  Silver is said to be self-sanitizing.  Whether the antimicrobial properties are useful in a shaker I cannot say, since the ingredients are usually in contact just for a few seconds.



#73 slkinsey

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Posted 21 December 2013 - 12:15 PM

If you want to keep the silver from tarnishing, you definitely want to make sure that you wipe it down until it's bone dry every time you use it.  I've found that if silver is rubbed with a cloth frequently enough, you shouldn't need to use any tarnish removal chemicals.  Or, yanno, you could just let it build up a nice attractive patina.


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#74 JoNorvelleWalker

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Posted 06 January 2014 - 11:09 PM

I noticed tonight that the description of the Baron shaker I have has been changed to say "pure silver", so maybe it isn't silver plate.  Anyway, I am very happy with it.



#75 Slimchandi

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Posted 08 January 2014 - 10:41 AM


However, if you're short on barware, I'd recommend the Koriko tins paired with their Fine Strainer - which is excellent

 

I have been experimenting with some basic dry shake drinks lately (Ramos Gin Fizz, Morgenthalers Amaretto Sour). I have a no-name boston shaker, and when I dry shake there's more than a little leakage between the tin and glass. Would the Koriko tins give me an improvement on this?

 

Strainer looks nice but might have to wait until payday: http://www.cocktailk...wx_0000_stl.htm



#76 EvergreenDan

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Posted 08 January 2014 - 11:05 AM

I don't have Koriko tins (at least I don't think I do -- I bought them at Boston Shaker), and I can't afford CK's Koriko strainer, but I can attest that a pair of tins seals better for dry shaking than I've been able to achieve with a tin and a pint mixing glass. They are also easily separated by squeezing, rather than smacking. My carpal tunnel appreciates this.

 

I haven't been anointed with egg white since I switched. I need need a new hawthorne spring though, since one visited the disposer.


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#77 Rafa

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Posted 08 January 2014 - 11:19 AM

For those dry shaking with a tin and pint glass, a single shaken ice cube helps create a seal without diluting too much during emulsification.
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#78 scamhi

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Posted 08 January 2014 - 03:32 PM

 

However, if you're short on barware, I'd recommend the Koriko tins paired with their Fine Strainer - which is excellent

 

I have been experimenting with some basic dry shake drinks lately (Ramos Gin Fizz, Morgenthalers Amaretto Sour). I have a no-name boston shaker, and when I dry shake there's more than a little leakage between the tin and glass. Would the Koriko tins give me an improvement on this?

 

Strainer looks nice but might have to wait until payday: http://www.cocktailk...wx_0000_stl.htm

 

I purchased the Koriko weighted tins from Cocktail Kingdom and they are great. no leaks. I had to learn how to break the seal on them after a few struggles.



#79 Slimchandi

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Posted 01 February 2014 - 06:57 AM

My Koriko tins finally arrived - and wonderful they are too. I umm-ed and arr-ed a good while before purchasing, but unlike the bottle of Fernet I picked up last night, I can see me using them a lot. A good excuse for another drink...



#80 Hassouni

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Posted 01 February 2014 - 09:02 AM

 

 

However, if you're short on barware, I'd recommend the Koriko tins paired with their Fine Strainer - which is excellent

 

I have been experimenting with some basic dry shake drinks lately (Ramos Gin Fizz, Morgenthalers Amaretto Sour). I have a no-name boston shaker, and when I dry shake there's more than a little leakage between the tin and glass. Would the Koriko tins give me an improvement on this?

 

Strainer looks nice but might have to wait until payday: http://www.cocktailk...wx_0000_stl.htm

 

I purchased the Koriko weighted tins from Cocktail Kingdom and they are great. no leaks. I had to learn how to break the seal on them after a few struggles.

 

 

I'm still learning to break the seal after hundreds of uses....



#81 FrogPrincesse

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Posted 01 February 2014 - 11:25 PM


I purchased the Koriko weighted tins from Cocktail Kingdom and they are great. no leaks. I had to learn how to break the seal on them after a few struggles.

 
I'm still learning to break the seal after hundreds of uses....
I have two sets of Koriko tins from Cocktail Kingdom and they break open without any effort. The key is to wait a few seconds after shaking, then they pop open very easily.

Edited by FrogPrincesse, 01 February 2014 - 11:26 PM.


#82 Slimchandi

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Posted 02 February 2014 - 02:39 PM

These make the world of difference on a dry shake! Not only did my whiskey sour come out nice and frothy, but most of it ended up in the glass rather than over me. Next step - Ramos Gin Fizz.



#83 Hassouni

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Posted 02 February 2014 - 11:16 PM

 Next step - Ramos Gin Fizz.

 

Your arms up to snuff?



#84 Rafa

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Posted 03 February 2014 - 12:19 PM

1797409_10100377048014582_1597843284_n.j

 

Requiescat in pace, my dear recipe-spangled, glass-hewn, decidedly un-pro shaker. I awoke to find you in pieces with an apology attached from my dear roommate, written on what I can only assume was the dirtiest piece of paper he could find. It looks like I will finally have to invest in a real pro shaker. 


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#85 Hassouni

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Posted 03 February 2014 - 12:32 PM

All this time you were using that?



#86 Rafa

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Posted 03 February 2014 - 12:36 PM

I am a stubborn and foolish man, and I will not trade up unless I'm made to. 


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”In Demerara some of the rum producers have a unique custom of placing chunks of raw meat in the casks to assist in aging, to absorb certain impurities, and to add a certain distinctive character.” -Peter Valaer, "Foreign and Domestic Rum," 1937


#87 mkayahara

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Posted 03 February 2014 - 12:41 PM

Finer spirits make for finer cocktails. Finer mixing glasses have no noticeable effect, at least not in double-blind studies.


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#88 haresfur

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Posted 04 February 2014 - 03:57 AM

 

Requiescat in pace, my dear recipe-spangled, glass-hewn, decidedly un-pro shaker. I awoke to find you in pieces with an apology attached from my dear roommate, written on what I can only assume was the dirtiest piece of paper he could find. It looks like I will finally have to invest in a real pro shaker. 

 

Oh  no! A true classic.  Did it have the rubber seal around the top?  I hope you at least got all the recipes transcribed to Kindred Cocktails, first.


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#89 Hassouni

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Posted 08 April 2014 - 12:48 PM

Sooooo, after several months of happy use with the Koriko set, I've come to notice something. Nearly every serious bar in DC that uses a metal-on-metal shaker is using some combination of shakers such that the smaller one protrudes a mere 2-3 inches above the top of the larger one, allowing for easy one handed-shaking. I don't know if it's a larger large tin or a smaller small one, or just different diameter openings. My small Koriko fits deeper down into a large non-Koriko weighted tin that I have, but the latter isn't as high quality as the large Koriko one and doesn't seal quite as well. 

 

Anyone know of any quality all-metal Boston shaker sets that allow for easy one handed shaking? Having done several bar-style cocktail events now, I'm seeing the benefit to be able to shake up 2 servings of 2 different drinks at the same time. 



#90 KD1191

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Posted 08 April 2014 - 02:11 PM

Sooooo, after several months of happy use with the Koriko set, I've come to notice something. Nearly every serious bar in DC that uses a metal-on-metal shaker is using some combination of shakers such that the smaller one protrudes a mere 2-3 inches above the top of the larger one, allowing for easy one handed-shaking. I don't know if it's a larger large tin or a smaller small one, or just different diameter openings. My small Koriko fits deeper down into a large non-Koriko weighted tin that I have, but the latter isn't as high quality as the large Koriko one and doesn't seal quite as well. 

 

Anyone know of any quality all-metal Boston shaker sets that allow for easy one handed shaking? Having done several bar-style cocktail events now, I'm seeing the benefit to be able to shake up 2 servings of 2 different drinks at the same time. 

 

Never had a problem with one-handed shaking on the Koriko weighted set I have from Cocktail Kingdom. That said, I'm 6'4", so I may be the exception.

 

ETA: The setup you describe seeing in bars sounds pretty similar to the one Toby describes here. So, perhaps be on the look out for 'Royal' brand weighted tins.


Edited by KD1191, 08 April 2014 - 02:20 PM.

True rye and true bourbon wake delight like any great wine...dignify man as possessing a palate that responds to them and ennoble his soul as shimmering with the response.

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