Jump to content


Welcome to the eG Forums!

These forums are a service of the Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, a 501c3 nonprofit organization dedicated to advancement of the culinary arts. Anyone can read the forums, however if you would like to participate in active discussions please join the Society.

Photo

Help, I need to buy a real pro shaker


  • Please log in to reply
98 replies to this topic

#1 Fat Guy

Fat Guy
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 29,303 posts
  • Location:New York, NY

Posted 18 March 2011 - 10:57 AM

With the two metal cups. How do I figure out what to buy?

PS I am in Zabar's NYC right now.

Sent from my Droid using Tapatalk

Steven A. Shaw aka "Fat Guy"
Co-founder, Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, sshaw@egstaff.org
Proud signatory to the eG Ethics code
Director, New Media Studies, International Culinary Center (take my food-blogging course)


#2 TAPrice

TAPrice
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 1,782 posts
  • Location:New Orleans

Posted 18 March 2011 - 10:59 AM

With the two metal cups. How do I figure out what to buy?

PS I am in Zabar's NYC right now.

Sent from my Droid using Tapatalk


You don't want one with two metal cups. You want a clear mixing glass and a metal top. Just test them to make sure they seal well.
Todd A. Price aka "TAPrice"


Homepage and writings; A Frolic of My Own (personal blog)

#3 KD1191

KD1191
  • participating member
  • 904 posts
  • Location:New York

Posted 18 March 2011 - 11:09 AM

I prefer two metal tins. I find the seal is better and I can more accurately gauge the chill based on how/when they start to ice over. The pair I use are just the bottom tins from two cobbler shakers I was given as gifts. One was a bit larger than average, one a bit smaller, together they work perfectly. They look a lot like these, but are not Japanese.

I have no idea what their hours are, or if they are only open by appointment, but you could try calling Cocktail Kingdom.

54 W. 21st Street
Suite 601
New York, NY 10010

Telephone: 212-647-9168
Email: info [at] cocktailkingdom.com


Edited by KD1191, 18 March 2011 - 11:13 AM.

True rye and true bourbon wake delight like any great wine...dignify man as possessing a palate that responds to them and ennoble his soul as shimmering with the response.

DeVoto, The Hour

#4 bostonapothecary

bostonapothecary
  • participating member
  • 1,247 posts
  • Location:have shaker will travel

Posted 18 March 2011 - 11:21 AM

at my house because i'm always shaking triples and larger, i swear by the canning jar. quart for three drinks (9oz.) and a half gallon for six (18oz). fill them to the brim with ice.

double strain into another shaker tin or pitcher then pour it out for everyone.
abstract expressionist beverage compounder
creator of acquired tastes
bostonapothecary.com

#5 lancastermike

lancastermike
  • legacy participant
  • 1,354 posts

Posted 18 March 2011 - 01:03 PM

I know many insist two cans are better than a can and a glass. I have always had the glass and can Boston shaker both at home and when I tended bar. For average everyday user I just can't imagine why there would be a difference

#6 EvergreenDan

EvergreenDan
  • participating member
  • 957 posts
  • Location:Boston

Posted 18 March 2011 - 01:33 PM

I like to see the ingredients in the mixing glass, but that's a minor point. I can gauge coldness by how much my left hand hurts. ;-)

That said, the mixing glasses are surprisingly fragile around stone countertops. :( Having multiple glasses makes it easy to mix a bunch of drinks, then ice and shake them as a second step. (If the drink is stirred, add ice to those first to get a headstart on the chilling.) Depending upon the cocktails, you have to wash the shaker and strainer. (A little Martini flavor won't hurt a Margarita, but a little Margarita flavor will definitely hurt a Martini. Yes, I shake Martinis sometimes. Don't hate me.)

For the same reason I have a bunch of OXO 2oz measuring cups. I can usually avoid having to wash one.

Another good online resource for such things: The Boston Shaker shakers.
Kindred Cocktails | Craft + Collect + Concoct + Categorize + Community

#7 Will

Will
  • participating member
  • 460 posts

Posted 18 March 2011 - 02:03 PM

I've used both two tins and tin / glass, and I don't think there's a huge difference; just comes down to personal preference (I don't like the small cheater tins that you have to hold, but there are tins which will lock in place more or less in the same way as a pint glass). Either way, the Japanese tins from Cocktail Kingdom are great, and fairly reasonably priced, though they're still more than a $2.99 special from barproducts.com or a local restaurant supply store.

#8 Karri

Karri
  • participating member
  • 162 posts

Posted 18 March 2011 - 03:44 PM

Alessi makes a very good boston shaker, the one with the separate glass and metal, worked with these ones for four years, very good, very sturdy, excellent seal, but do not wash the glass in a machine or you're going to end up with a face full of shards.

edit: quick googling located this at Bloomingdales http://www1.blooming...CategoryID=8287 108USD, a little steep...

But it is an excellent shaker, never been disappointed with it in a professional setting.

Edited by Karri, 18 March 2011 - 03:50 PM.

The perfect vichyssoise is served hot and made with equal parts of butter to potato.

#9 janeer

janeer
  • participating member
  • 1,198 posts

Posted 18 March 2011 - 07:46 PM

at my house because i'm always shaking triples and larger, i swear by the canning jar. quart for three drinks (9oz.) and a half gallon for six (18oz). fill them to the brim with ice.

double strain into another shaker tin or pitcher then pour it out for everyone.

I thought I was the only one who did this. When I broke the glass piece of my (inherited) father's shaker, I started "temporarily" to use a quart canning jar--and never went back. For one drink for myself, I use a pint jar.

#10 Pierogi

Pierogi
  • participating member
  • 1,476 posts
  • Location:Long Beach, CA

Posted 18 March 2011 - 10:20 PM

I prefer two metal tins. I find the seal is better and I can more accurately gauge the chill based on how/when they start to ice over. The pair I use are just the bottom tins from two cobbler shakers I was given as gifts. One was a bit larger than average, one a bit smaller, together they work perfectly.....

After breaking the glass jars on two Oggi Boston shakers in a little over a year and a half, this is precisely what I use now as well. Both the glass jars broke in a VERY scary fashion....it reminded me of those old Western movies where the bad guy broke a bottle on the bar during the fight scene and threatened the hero with the jagged glass.

One I broke simply by hitting it against my sink faucet while I was washing it. And it wasn't a SLAM into the faucet, it was at best, a hard tap. The other shattered into lethal pieces when I pushed too hard with my muddler. *THAT* time I was seriously lucky I didn't bleed to death, or at least need stitches, from the resulting break. I was honestly scared carrying it to the recyling bin. And neither of them had been washed in a dishwasher, always by hand.

So, now I stick with the bastardized 2 metal cobbler parts. A plus is they both go into the dishwasher ! And I don't have to worry about having the ER on standby when I mix an adult beverage.
--Roberta--
"Let's slip out of these wet clothes, and into a dry Martini" - Robert Benchley
Pierogi's eG Foodblog

My *outside* blog, "A Pound Of Yeast"

#11 eje

eje
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 4,359 posts
  • Location:San Francisco, CA

Posted 21 March 2011 - 12:58 PM

Totally agree with Pierogi on this one.

After chipping one too many "tempered" glass mixing glasses I switched to all metal 3 or 4 years ago and haven't looked back.
---
Erik Ellestad
If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...
Bernal Heights, SF, CA

#12 slkinsey

slkinsey
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 11,104 posts
  • Location:New York, New York

Posted 21 March 2011 - 01:14 PM

I know many insist two cans are better than a can and a glass. I have always had the glass and can Boston shaker both at home and when I tended bar. For average everyday user I just can't imagine why there would be a difference.

I think there are several good reasons to prefer an all-metal Boston set over a glass-and-metal Boston set. First, as others have pointed out, there is the breakage issue. An all-metal set won't break. Second, I find the seal in an all-metal set more reliable, in part because it's easy to have your index finger over the top of the cheater tin when shaking whereas in a glass-and-metal set you have to rely upon the strength of the seal. I've never had or seen an all-metal set fly apart mid-shake. Not so for a glass-and-metal set. Third, although I find it a more reliable seal, I also find it significantly easier to break the seal of an all-metal set. This is because of the flexibility of the metal. You can simply squeeze the large tin and force the cheater to the side until you get that cool "pop" sound only an all-metal set provides. I've never had a "stuck" all-metal set. Not so for a glass-and-metal set. And lastly, although the difference may be subtle to some, especially depending on the ice and other things you're working with, you can get a colder drink with an all-metal set (this was actually the original reason NYC bars started using them). This is because the thermal load of a room-temperature all-metal set is less than the thermal load of a glass-and-metal set (if you freeze the pint glass in a glass-and-metal set, the thermal advantage swings to that design). I actually find this last reason the least compelling reason to use an all-metal set. The ease of use and the fact that you can slam them around without worrying about breaking them is enough reason for me to prefer all-metal.
Samuel Lloyd Kinsey

#13 Alex

Alex
  • participating member
  • 2,195 posts
  • Location:Grand Rapids, MI

Posted 21 March 2011 - 01:33 PM


at my house because i'm always shaking triples and larger, i swear by the canning jar. quart for three drinks (9oz.) and a half gallon for six (18oz). fill them to the brim with ice.

double strain into another shaker tin or pitcher then pour it out for everyone.

I thought I was the only one who did this. When I broke the glass piece of my (inherited) father's shaker, I started "temporarily" to use a quart canning jar--and never went back. For one drink for myself, I use a pint jar.

Me three. I have a regular shaker, but usually don't use it unless we have guests and I want to put on a (purely amateur-level) show.
Gene Weingarten, writing in The Washington Post about online news stories and their readers' comments: "I basically like 'comments,' though they can seem a little jarring: spit-flecked rants that are appended to a product that at least tries for a measure of objectivity and dignity. It's as though when you order a sirloin steak, it comes with a side of maggots."

"A vasectomy might cost as much as a year’s worth of ice cream, but that doesn’t mean it’s equally enjoyable." -Ezra Dyer, NY Times

#14 slkinsey

slkinsey
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 11,104 posts
  • Location:New York, New York

Posted 21 March 2011 - 01:36 PM



at my house because i'm always shaking triples and larger, i swear by the canning jar. quart for three drinks (9oz.) and a half gallon for six (18oz). fill them to the brim with ice.

double strain into another shaker tin or pitcher then pour it out for everyone.

I thought I was the only one who did this. When I broke the glass piece of my (inherited) father's shaker, I started "temporarily" to use a quart canning jar--and never went back. For one drink for myself, I use a pint jar.

Me three. I have a regular shaker, but usually don't use it unless we have guests and I want to put on a (purely amateur-level) show.

I use one of these for a crowd.
Samuel Lloyd Kinsey

#15 Roddy

Roddy
  • participating member
  • 18 posts

Posted 21 March 2011 - 01:46 PM

Couldn't agree more on the double metal can -- much easier to break the seal.

For multiple stirred cocktails I have used a large french press with good results after unscrewing and removing the mesh part, I don't press down or anything, the slits in the lid work well enough.
Roddy Rickhouse
Drinks Writer for Frontier Psychiatrist
http://frontpsych.com/

#16 johnder

johnder
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 1,340 posts
  • Location:Brooklyn, NY

Posted 21 March 2011 - 01:52 PM

Double metal, weighted tin, 18/28 is my standard.
John Deragon

foodblog 1 / 2
--
I feel sorry for people that don't drink. When they wake up in the morning, that's as good as they're going to feel all day -- Dean Martin

#17 Fat Guy

Fat Guy
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 29,303 posts
  • Location:New York, NY

Posted 22 March 2011 - 04:30 AM

It turns out Zabar's didn't have a metal set or the two components thereof.

I already have a metal-and-glass Boston shaker and I don't favor it. It gets stuck most every time I use it and there's always a big to-do getting it unstuck.

I had to mix about 30 cocktails the other night and really wanted metal. I'd still like to have one around.

Steven A. Shaw aka "Fat Guy"
Co-founder, Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, sshaw@egstaff.org
Proud signatory to the eG Ethics code
Director, New Media Studies, International Culinary Center (take my food-blogging course)


#18 weinoo

weinoo
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 6,396 posts
  • Location:NYC

Posted 22 March 2011 - 04:58 AM

It turns out Zabar's didn't have a metal set or the two components thereof.

I already have a metal-and-glass Boston shaker and I don't favor it. It gets stuck most every time I use it and there's always a big to-do getting it unstuck.

I had to mix about 30 cocktails the other night and really wanted metal. I'd still like to have one around.

Many of the restaurant supply places down near and around the Bowery have what you need. They're also pretty cheap and disposable. The place on the NW corner of Houston and Bowery, called Chef Restaurant Supply and the one on Lafayette just north of Houston, called Win Depot are two particular faves.
Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"
mweinstein@eGstaff.org
Tasty Travails - My Blog
My eGullet FoodBog - A Tale of Two Boroughs
Was it you baby...or just a Brilliant Disguise?

#19 Karri

Karri
  • participating member
  • 162 posts

Posted 22 March 2011 - 05:10 AM

To 'unstuck' a boston shaker all you have to do is hit it not on either one of the inclined sides, but on the sides where the hold is strongest. And the talk about tempered glasses breaking, unless it has been washed in a machine or polished too much it will never break. Had only one glass burst on me and that was when a temp blocker had washed it in a machine... And this is in four years where I used it to make about 20-40 cocktails almost every night.

edit: And ofcourse if you do not like the boston, then a regular cobbler shaker is a very good option, you can get them very cheap, http://www.amazon.co...s/dp/B000796F1W

Edited by Karri, 22 March 2011 - 05:19 AM.

The perfect vichyssoise is served hot and made with equal parts of butter to potato.

#20 EvergreenDan

EvergreenDan
  • participating member
  • 957 posts
  • Location:Boston

Posted 22 March 2011 - 06:43 AM

I would be interested in a tempered mixing glass. The ones I have seen are not tempered and break into a few pieces with jagged edges (rather than shattering completely into small pieces).

Also, I don't see how using a dishwasher at a maximum of 100*C would matter when the annealing temp is 720*C.

http://en.wikipedia....Toughened_glass

Edited by EvergreenDan, 22 March 2011 - 06:43 AM.

Kindred Cocktails | Craft + Collect + Concoct + Categorize + Community

#21 Karri

Karri
  • participating member
  • 162 posts

Posted 22 March 2011 - 07:59 AM

EvergreenDan: I don't know, I always understood it was about the "inbuilt tension" that is prevalent. Since the same thing happens if you drop it on the floor, it becomes fragile. I promise you I've seen it happen a few times and the one time it happened to me also it had been washed in the machine, and when I banged it like usual on the side the whole thing exploded like prop glass, pieces flying everywhere.
The perfect vichyssoise is served hot and made with equal parts of butter to potato.

#22 Mayur

Mayur
  • participating member
  • 590 posts

Posted 22 March 2011 - 08:32 AM

You might want to come around to East 6th near the corner of Ave A tonight...
Mayur Subbarao, aka "Mayur"

#23 Mayur

Mayur
  • participating member
  • 590 posts

Posted 22 March 2011 - 08:32 AM

18/28 cheater/shaker in metal is what I use.
Mayur Subbarao, aka "Mayur"

#24 weinoo

weinoo
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 6,396 posts
  • Location:NYC

Posted 22 March 2011 - 08:54 AM

You might want to come around to East 6th near the corner of Ave A tonight...

Not after last night.
Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"
mweinstein@eGstaff.org
Tasty Travails - My Blog
My eGullet FoodBog - A Tale of Two Boroughs
Was it you baby...or just a Brilliant Disguise?

#25 JoNorvelleWalker

JoNorvelleWalker
  • participating member
  • 1,324 posts
  • Location:New Jersey USA

Posted 10 October 2013 - 09:40 PM

I am new to making cocktails and I am thinking about a shaker.  I like the look of a glass and metal combination, such as these:

 

Schott Zwiesel

 

WMF Loft

 

 

I of course want a shaker that doesn't leak and is easy to get apart.  Any recommendations?  Would a glass canning jar work just as well?  And does one really need a special strainer, or could I make do with my kitchen strainer?  Thanks!



#26 Adam George

Adam George
  • participating member
  • 438 posts
  • Location:London - UK

Posted 11 October 2013 - 01:17 AM

No, no, no.

 

http://www.cocktailk...xx_0028_set.htm

 

I also use the Baron Yukiwa at work.


The Dead Parrot
Built from the ground up by bartenders, for everyone:

Cocktails, Craft Beers, English Wines in provincial Sussex 


#27 JoNorvelleWalker

JoNorvelleWalker
  • participating member
  • 1,324 posts
  • Location:New Jersey USA

Posted 11 October 2013 - 01:29 AM

No, no, no.

 

http://www.cocktailk...xx_0028_set.htm

 

I also use the Baron Yukiwa at work.

 

Do the two parts fit together, or do you supply your own pint glass?



#28 slkinsey

slkinsey
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 11,104 posts
  • Location:New York, New York

Posted 11 October 2013 - 11:06 AM

The two parts fit together.  The small tin fits inside the larger tin.  One advantage of this design is that you can use the large tin for stirred cocktails if you don't have a separate stirring vessel.  You will need a separate strainer.

 

You might rather use a cobbler shaker, however, which has a built-in strainer.  This kind of shaker used to be a bit of a joke in the cocktailian community, but that is before Japanese-style cobbler shakers started making the rounds.  Now they are very much au courant.  If you are planning on usually making drinks for two, I would recommend the 800ml Usagi Cobbler Shaker.  I have too many, according to Mrs. slkinsey many different kinds of cocktail shakers at home, and have found myself most frequently using this one when making drinks around the house. 


Samuel Lloyd Kinsey

#29 FrogPrincesse

FrogPrincesse
  • society donor
  • 2,809 posts
  • Location:San Diego, CA

Posted 11 October 2013 - 12:48 PM

I second the recommendation for the Koriko tins. I have two sets and they work beautifully.



#30 Rafa

Rafa
  • participating member
  • 625 posts
  • Location:New York

Posted 11 October 2013 - 01:11 PM

I have a crummy old glass-and-metal Libbey set from Target. Has recipes for your parents' favorite cocktails (Tom Collins, Martini, Daiquiri, and uh Bacardi) on the sides. Looks like this, works just fine. Do I have to turn in my eGullet cred card now? 


DrunkLab.tumblr.com

 

”In Demerara some of the rum producers have a unique custom of placing chunks of raw meat in the casks to assist in aging, to absorb certain impurities, and to add a certain distinctive character.” -Peter Valaer, "Foreign and Domestic Rum," 1937