Jump to content


Welcome to the eG Forums!

These forums are a service of the Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, a 501c3 nonprofit organization dedicated to advancement of the culinary arts. Anyone can read the forums, however if you would like to participate in active discussions please join the Society.

Photo

Whole Candied Fruit


  • Please log in to reply
45 replies to this topic

#31 heidih

heidih
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 10,649 posts
  • Location:Los Angeles

Posted 03 May 2011 - 01:36 PM

Linda - sad to hear of your fruit malfunction :sad: I hope you will give it another try.

Heidi - I used the Murcott Mini-Mandarins from Ripe to You. Since you have your own trees, I wonder if you used lightly under-ripe fruit, you might have better luck with achieving uncollapsed candied fruit?


Unfortunately they are fully ripe and need to be picked. Will do some research.

#32 ermintrude

ermintrude
  • participating member
  • 451 posts

Posted 07 June 2011 - 03:43 PM

Well cracked open my Jar today and all had collapsed apart from two, when I opened the jar there was gas released which implied that some fermentation had gone on, I'd have thought it would have been too sweet to allow this but no. Tasted the collapsed fruit and yuk, dried out insides so FAIL. There were two clementines were not collapsed and looked good but on tasting while the insides were ok they were not very nice and the skin was not edible but I could see potential there.

Why did it fail, I've no idea as this was my first attempt but have some ideas.

The fruit was waxed - I thought boiling would have removed this but next time will scrub and scrub.
Not enough holes, while I used a needle to make loads of holes next time will try a small knitting needle through the middle.

Anyone have any other ideas ?
Time flies like an arrow, fruit flies like a banana.

#33 Lindacakes

Lindacakes
  • participating member
  • 882 posts
  • Location:Brooklyn, New York

Posted 18 June 2011 - 06:07 PM

Perhaps this is why we see whole candied fruit so rarely.
I like to bake nice things. And then I eat them. Then I can bake some more.

#34 powerwhisk

powerwhisk
  • participating member
  • 1 posts

Posted 16 July 2011 - 07:04 AM

Sorry to come so late to the party; I joined, in part, so that I could comment on this.

I started to play with whole dried oranges about this same time. I didn't have clementines available, so I used tangelos and mandarins. I also made a (failed) attempt at candying key limes. I learned a few things that may come in useful for you.

First off, the fresher the fruit, the less of a chance there seems to be that it's going to implode during the cooking. Also, higher temps wreak havoc; anything above a bare simmer seems to be ill-advised. But if your fruit does implode, fear not, it will taste good just the same. I did a large batch, and ended up giving a few to a friend at work. He in turn used them as the sweetening agent while making ginger cookies. So if you're worried about presentation, just use the dented oranges in your baking instead.

There is a gourmet market near me that imports whole, candied Valencia oranges from Spain. I picked one up from there, and discovered a 1/4" hole drilled in the bottom of the orange. Apparently that's pretty normal, and I think it's a way better idea than pricking holes all over the orange like you and I did. When I tried my key limes, I didn't know to put holes in them, and they all dented.

On a side note, I candied some kumquats this week, and poked a single hole in the stem end of each one. Some of them dented, some didn't, but they all tasted excellent. When they were finished, I rolled half of them in sugar before putting them on the dehydrator at 95F for a day, and the sugared ones ended up having a firmer skin, and a more balanced flavor.

Hope I was able to help a little.

#35 Darienne

Darienne
  • participating member
  • 4,571 posts
  • Location:Rolling Hills of Cavan, Ontario

Posted 16 July 2011 - 07:22 AM

Use of collapsed candied fruits: I chopped up my collapsed Kumquats and used them as an inclusion in ice cream.
Darienne


learn, learn, learn...

Cheers & Chocolates

#36 natasha1270

natasha1270
  • participating member
  • 385 posts
  • Location:Falls Church, VA

Posted 16 July 2011 - 07:54 AM

My boss recently brought back these incredibly delicious Chocotejas - Dulce de Leche & Candied Peel filled Chocolates from Peru. Ever since, I've been thinking of filling a few of my candied mandarins with Dulce and dipping them whole in chocolate.
"The main thing to remember about Italian food is that when you put your groceries in the car, the quality of your dinner has already been decided." – Mario Batali

#37 Kerry Beal

Kerry Beal
  • participating member
  • 8,857 posts
  • Location:Ontario, Canada

Posted 20 July 2012 - 09:40 AM

I'm away from my cookbooks and at lunch time today pulled a nice sized angelica plant from the ground (pictures later) - wonder if anyone could look through their books and give me a couple of suggestions for candying methods for it? I think I have Time-Life Candy at the condo and I know I have Greweling up here - but I'm not sure if I'll find what I'm after in either of those.

#38 andiesenji

andiesenji
  • society donor
  • 9,129 posts
  • Location:Southern California

Posted 20 July 2012 - 02:47 PM

I use this method. From A Gardener's Table.

It is identical to a recipe in one of my old pre-WWI cookbooks. The only difference is in the amount.

The original recipe specifies 5 pounds of angelica stems. Oy!
"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett
My blog:Books,Cooks,Gadgets&Gardening

#39 Kerry Beal

Kerry Beal
  • participating member
  • 8,857 posts
  • Location:Ontario, Canada

Posted 20 July 2012 - 03:28 PM

Thanks Andi. I realized when I got home that this angelica is probably too far gone for candying - the stems are purple - and apparently this should be done in April/May when the stems are green and tender.


IMG_0294.jpg

I've got some seeds at home - I'll germinate and plant them so they are ready for next spring.

#40 Lindacakes

Lindacakes
  • participating member
  • 882 posts
  • Location:Brooklyn, New York

Posted 03 August 2012 - 10:44 AM

Excellent tips, Powerwhisk, thank you.

That angelica stalk is remarkable. Imagine the first person to behold it and think, "Candy."
I like to bake nice things. And then I eat them. Then I can bake some more.

#41 andiesenji

andiesenji
  • society donor
  • 9,129 posts
  • Location:Southern California

Posted 03 August 2012 - 08:39 PM

Angelica grew wild in the woods where I grew up and we gathered it in the spring (along with asparagus and other wild things, like ramps, wild garlic, elderflowers, sassafras roots, etc.) and it was candied and dried but some was candied and left in the syrup to flavor it. It was mostly used as cake decorations but my great-grandmother like to use a stick of it to stir and sweeten her tea.
"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett
My blog:Books,Cooks,Gadgets&Gardening

#42 Mjx

Mjx

    Senior Host

  • host
  • 5,688 posts

Posted 04 August 2012 - 12:40 AM

Thanks Andi. I realized when I got home that this angelica is probably too far gone for candying - the stems are purple - and apparently this should be done in April/May when the stems are green and tender.


IMG_0294.jpg

I've got some seeds at home - I'll germinate and plant them so they are ready for next spring.


Kerry, I candied some angelica stalks a few months back, and although they're nicest in the spring/early summer, if the smaller shoots (?) of the stalk are flexible, not string-y, and fragrant, they'll do just fine.

Michaela, aka "Mjx"
Senior Host, eG Forums
mscioscia@egstaff.org


#43 Kerry Beal

Kerry Beal
  • participating member
  • 8,857 posts
  • Location:Ontario, Canada

Posted 04 August 2012 - 08:46 AM


Thanks Andi. I realized when I got home that this angelica is probably too far gone for candying - the stems are purple - and apparently this should be done in April/May when the stems are green and tender.


IMG_0294.jpg

I've got some seeds at home - I'll germinate and plant them so they are ready for next spring.


Kerry, I candied some angelica stalks a few months back, and although they're nicest in the spring/early summer, if the smaller shoots (?) of the stalk are flexible, not string-y, and fragrant, they'll do just fine.


Darn - I read something that said only use the main stalks so I pitched the whole plant. Ah well - next year!

#44 Jonathan J

Jonathan J
  • participating member
  • 9 posts

Posted 21 August 2012 - 06:08 AM

Great thread. I wonder if anyone has experience candying calamondins. I usually make mine into marmalade, but want to try something different. Thanks.

#45 Jonathan J

Jonathan J
  • participating member
  • 9 posts

Posted 13 September 2012 - 12:08 PM

I candied the calamondins. They collapsed and were a somewhat off color (they weren't very orange when picked). The flavor was great, but they were very seedy. Don't think I will do it again as they were too much trouble picking out the seeds.

#46 TylerK

TylerK
  • participating member
  • 132 posts
  • Location:Toronto, Ontario

Posted 09 November 2012 - 08:03 AM

Has anyone tried the candying process with previously frozen fruit? I was unable to locate any fresh sour cherries this summer, but when I was at the grocery store I saw large tubs of sour cherries in the freezer section. Wondering if I should give it a try. Home-made glacee cherries taste so much better than the coloured "scary cherries" you find in the grocery store.