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Restaurant/Bar Annoyances


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#241 Shel_B

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Posted 03 August 2013 - 09:23 AM

He shrugged and said that he had no control over the "personal" affectations of servers who wanted to wear piercings and have long fingernails. 

 

Lots of places have dress and appearance codes. 


.... Shel


#242 Taveren

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Posted 22 August 2013 - 11:12 PM

I've had similar issues when picking up sandwiches at Subway. The person making my sandwich donned clear plastic gloves and then, as she slid my sandwich down the line on a paper sheet, she wiped the counter clean into the little trash openings with her gloved hand and then went back to making my sandwich. I yelled at her to stop and put new gloves on.
I had another Subway employee stop making my sandwich to answer the phone and then she came back to finish making my sandwich with her now-contaminated gloves. I also stopped her from touching my sandwich and told her to put new gloves on.
What's sad is they have this deer-in-the-headlights look when you try to explain what they did wrong and they just don't get it.

If that bothers you I suggest you never eat in a restaurant again.

Edited by Taveren, 22 August 2013 - 11:12 PM.


#243 Tri2Cook

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Posted 23 August 2013 - 03:18 AM

I've had similar issues when picking up sandwiches at Subway. The person making my sandwich donned clear plastic gloves and then, as she slid my sandwich down the line on a paper sheet, she wiped the counter clean into the little trash openings with her gloved hand and then went back to making my sandwich. I yelled at her to stop and put new gloves on.
I had another Subway employee stop making my sandwich to answer the phone and then she came back to finish making my sandwich with her now-contaminated gloves. I also stopped her from touching my sandwich and told her to put new gloves on.
What's sad is they have this deer-in-the-headlights look when you try to explain what they did wrong and they just don't get it.

If that bothers you I suggest you never eat in a restaurant again.


I was thinking the same thing. There aren't a lot of cooks out there wearing any gloves at all while they handle your food and for every one you see on tv where the chef is yelling at the line cook for not taking a shower after touching the endive and before touching the arugula, there's a whole bunch of them answering phones, wiping their hands on their already dirty shirt, putting lettuce on your sandwich directly after putting a raw burger on the grill, etc. I guess it's easier to not think about since they're not standing right in front of you like at Subway... but there are much more offensive things than wiping some lettuce off the assembly line going on in a lot of places.


It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

#244 Toliver

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Posted 23 August 2013 - 09:20 AM

I've had similar issues when picking up sandwiches at Subway. The person making my sandwich donned clear plastic gloves and then, as she slid my sandwich down the line on a paper sheet, she wiped the counter clean into the little trash openings with her gloved hand and then went back to making my sandwich. I yelled at her to stop and put new gloves on.
I had another Subway employee stop making my sandwich to answer the phone and then she came back to finish making my sandwich with her now-contaminated gloves. I also stopped her from touching my sandwich and told her to put new gloves on.
What's sad is they have this deer-in-the-headlights look when you try to explain what they did wrong and they just don't get it.

If that bothers you I suggest you never eat in a restaurant again.

The pretense of the employees putting on gloves and then dirtying the gloves in plain view while making my sandwich just ticked me off. If you're going to bother to pretend to be sanitary, then keep up the charade completely until I'm gone or why bother?



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#245 Arey

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Posted 23 August 2013 - 04:07 PM

In the Asian Supermarket I go to in a nearby community, the cashiers wear those blue disposable gloves. Only they don't dispose of them. They use them over and over again until they're almost black. Yes, it's disgusting, but if I want my Lee Kum Kee Oyster Sauce , chive dumplings, and MaMa Sita's barbeque sauce where else am I going to get them?.  It's almost 60 miles to Philadelphia.
In  a similar vein, I frequently order 16 chicken drumsticks, skin off at my butcher shop.When peeling them. they reach under the butcher block, grab a very much used, and frankly, filthy apron and use it to yank  the skins off after they've peeled the skin down to the bottom of the drumstick.   When done they then wipe off the butcher block with the same apron, and throw it back down under the butcher block. Several years ago there was a food blog from an eguletteer who had returned to their hometown in India and was posting fascinating pictures of street food they were eating. They did however caution  people that if they hadn't grown up eating this food in this community they might not want to eat it.  Well, I feel the same way about my butcher and his aprons. I've been going there for almost 40 years and have built up an immunity to anything  I could catch.
But those cashiers in the Asian Supermarket with their coal black once blue gloves give me pause.


"A fool", he said, "would have swallowed it". Samuel Johnson


#246 David Hensley

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Posted 27 August 2013 - 02:25 PM

My personal pet peeve these days, believe it or not, is the overwhelming use of the term "aioli". I'm sick to death of every damned flavored mayonaise out there being referred to as Aioli! Traditional handmade mayo, flavored with real, raw garlic? Thats aioli! Your personal mix of Hellman's, dijon  mustard, and raspberry vinegar? Not at all....


I'm a lifelong professional chef. If that doesn't explain some of my mental and emotional quirks, maybe you should see a doctor, and have some of yours examined...


#247 quiet1

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Posted 30 August 2013 - 11:11 PM

 

I've had similar issues when picking up sandwiches at Subway. The person making my sandwich donned clear plastic gloves and then, as she slid my sandwich down the line on a paper sheet, she wiped the counter clean into the little trash openings with her gloved hand and then went back to making my sandwich. I yelled at her to stop and put new gloves on.
I had another Subway employee stop making my sandwich to answer the phone and then she came back to finish making my sandwich with her now-contaminated gloves. I also stopped her from touching my sandwich and told her to put new gloves on.
What's sad is they have this deer-in-the-headlights look when you try to explain what they did wrong and they just don't get it.

If that bothers you I suggest you never eat in a restaurant again.

The pretense of the employees putting on gloves and then dirtying the gloves in plain view while making my sandwich just ticked me off. If you're going to bother to pretend to be sanitary, then keep up the charade completely until I'm gone or why bother?

 

I've unfortunately seen this in some health care staff, too. (Not nurses or doctors, but aides working at nursing homes and that sort of thing.) As far as I can tell they think the gloves are to protect THEM from touching things, not to also protect you/other things from cross contamination. And some people seem to be completely unable to grasp the concept. Drove me nuts when I was dealing with it all the time.

 

As far as other pet peeves - similar to not telling me if a dish isn't available promptly, not telling me promptly (or at all!) if a dish can be prepared the way I asked. MSG is an instant migraine trigger for me in anything other than tiny amounts, so I have to ask about it in places that traditionally are heavy with the MSG - I am perfectly fine with the concept that some dishes have to be marinaded or sauces prepared ahead of time and so there's no way they can prepare it without the MSG if they usually use it, just tell me that's the case so I can pick something else. Don't wait until everything else is ready so that I'm stuck sitting there, the lone one from my party with no food.



#248 annabelle

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Posted 31 August 2013 - 09:36 AM

My personal pet peeve these days, believe it or not, is the overwhelming use of the term "aioli". I'm sick to death of every damned flavored mayonaise out there being referred to as Aioli! Traditional handmade mayo, flavored with real, raw garlic? Thats aioli! Your personal mix of Hellman's, dijon  mustard, and raspberry vinegar? Not at all....

 

 

Heh.  How about "confit"?  A confit of tomatoes?  Really?


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#249 David Hensley

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Posted 14 October 2013 - 02:54 PM

I know, right?!!?  When I "confit" something, I make it a point to refer to it on the menu as a "preserved" whatever...

 

Also, if I hear one more server describe the "umami" of a given menu item, somebody id getting shanked...


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I'm a lifelong professional chef. If that doesn't explain some of my mental and emotional quirks, maybe you should see a doctor, and have some of yours examined...


#250 palo

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Posted 03 April 2015 - 06:50 AM

Reading a number of threads regarding inadequate service in restaurants and decisions by diners to find their own missing silverware, find the coffee station etc. Has anyone ever had the gall to cook their own food? Obviously we are referring to a decidedly down-scale eatery, with an extremely informal standard. Due to health and legal regulations this would probably never happen in N. America.

p

#251 palo

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Posted 07 April 2015 - 11:19 AM

You order a steak medium and it arrives rare, your food arrives lukewarm instead of hot. What is the best way for a restaurant to remedy this situation? Obviously back on the grill, salamander or microwave are the easiest remediation, but how does that affect the quality of the final result?

A steak removed from the grill, plated, waiting at the pass for a pickup, delivered to the table, discovered to be not quite what was ordered, brought to the attention of the wait staff, returned to the kitchen, placed back on the grill, re-plated, waiting for pickup, re-delivered to customer has to affect the quality.

Appreciating that the restaurant is in the business of making money and can not afford to be tossing out steaks is there an easy way out? From the customer's point of view re-firing would produce the best result. Unless a soup has gone stone cold re-heating should have little or no effect, but other foods may not be so forgiving of the reheating process.

What's your take?

p

#252 weinoo

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Posted 07 April 2015 - 11:23 AM

I bring my own Searzall.


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#253 gulfporter

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Posted 07 April 2015 - 11:43 AM

Maybe it's due to that stupid McDonald's coffee lawsuit, but I can never get 'hot' soup at a restaurant.  It's a joke with my DH....I now ask the server to make sure it's hot-hot when I order and warn them I'll send it back if it isn't.  And still about 50% of the time it's not hot enough!  I don't think reheating soup hurts it unless it's a delicate bisque or one with fresh seafood atop it (or other fresh garnishes....avocado for example) that could be zapped to death on a reheat.  Hopefully the kitchen would remove the garnishes before reheating.  Normally I only order soup on very cold days and it's of a hearty variety.  

 

I never order steak when I eat out, so can't help you there.  



#254 radtek

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Posted 07 April 2015 - 11:52 AM

I don't like the idea of them throwing food I've cut into back on the grill. 

 

Normally I don't order steaks but if an error is made and unless it's well done- well I'll eat it. Parley it into a desert because I'm not waiting another 20-30 minutes while everyone else eats.

 

But plain cold food that's supposed to be hot I won't stand for.


Edited by radtek, 07 April 2015 - 11:54 AM.

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#255 cdh

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Posted 07 April 2015 - 12:01 PM

Places I find myself tend to be run well and don't present this problem.  My solution would be not to return if they can't get food cooked and out of the kitchen while it is still hot. 


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#256 Deryn

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Posted 07 April 2015 - 02:59 PM

If there is a hair in my food, I return it. If there is meat that is not done, and it is beef, unless it is really rare and bleeding hard (I like med-rare), I will eat it but I will inform the waiter that it wasn't quite as ordered. If it is overdone but not yet turned to jerky, I might attempt to eat a few bites but most of it would remain on my plate, and the waiter would again be informed. If chicken or any other meat which should not be served undercooked, I would return it. If the soup is stone cold, I would ask for it to be heated, please. I would not ask for a free dessert (though, in my experience, I might be offered something or the bill reduced). Unless the service, and/or the food, is truly awful, I usually pay the full bill despite the errors.

 

If the waiter is seemingly uncaring or it is something he/she probably actually plated themselves (salads and soup are often in large bowls or hotpots in less expensive restaurants and waiters bring those along with bread, water/soft drinks, etc. without interaction with the cook staff - which means the wait staff retains responsibility for its condition upon arrival at the table), he/she might notice my face is not as pleasant as it was when I entered and, in most cases, I probably would not return. I don't make a big fuss but I do get my point across in one way or another.

 

Mistakes happen but good restaurants and waiters are responsive and willing to make it right in some way. On the other hand, you are asking for pat answers to varying situations and one's response may be different depending on the situation/restaurant, etc.

 

This is going to be one interesting poem, palo.  :smile: I do hope you publish it here for us to enjoy. And, by the way, what are YOUR thoughts on this topic?


Edited by Deryn, 07 April 2015 - 03:03 PM.

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#257 scubadoo97

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Posted 07 April 2015 - 03:30 PM

I bring my own Searzall.

You beat me to it. But in my mind I was envisioning a restaurant employee blasting it table side.

#258 cdh

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Posted 07 April 2015 - 03:44 PM


 

This is going to be one interesting poem, palo.  :smile: I do hope you publish it here for us to enjoy. And, by the way, what are YOUR thoughts on this topic?

Indeed.  This Grand Canto of Bad Restaurant Behavior and Embarrassing and Uncomfortable Food Related Stuff is  definitely coming together, if Palo's topics of interest  are any measure.


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#259 palo

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Posted 07 April 2015 - 04:51 PM

As mentioned, it's an individual choice. Personally cold soup/meal would be requested to be re-heated. Steak would depend on how far off it was from what was requested. I would live with a little rarer or a little over done and not complain to the waiter. I like my steaks rare so unless it was uncooked, that wouldn't be a problem. If it was closer to medium instead of rare but still somewhat pink again not a problem.

 

My concern would be if the kitchen's "fix" would be more to my liking than what I have before me.

 

Do we have a poet in residence or is the job up for grabs?

 

p



#260 Thanks for the Crepes

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Posted 08 April 2015 - 12:52 AM

I just don't go back to places where I am served cold or tepid food that is supposed to be hot. I don't send anything back ever.

 

I may spend some time and effort on feedback with a mom and pop place I like and want to see them succeed where the error was a one-off. Chains do not get a second chance. I don't eat at those much anyway. I figure it's not my job to help you run your business, unless I already like you and care about you.

 

Cold breakfast food is particularly intolerable to me, and I can't think of a single local breakfast restaurant I've tried that serves properly hot food. IHOP and Perkins are especially egregious in this area. They serve their breakfasts on thick china platters, but don't preheat them, so even properly cooked and quickly served breakfasts give up their heat to these thermal sinks quite quickly. Such a pity, because if they were preheated, they'd be ideal for serving up eggs and pancakes.

 

Fortunately, breakfast foods are very easy and quick to cook at home, and I preheat my plates.

 

The only thing I dislike more than cold eggs is cold pasta, but I'm trying to broaden my horizons on that front with some of the Asian noodle preparations that are served cold. I have big, thick pasta bowls that I preheat for Italian pasta, and I expect, and sometimes get the same at some of out local restaurants. If they disappoint, I don't return.


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I want to move to another planet, with pure spring water.

 

This planet would have a global climate like Hawaii, California, Florida.

 

We'd raise perfect and abundant flora and fauna!

 

Want to come with?

 

 


#261 JoNorvelleWalker

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Posted 08 April 2015 - 08:44 PM

I just don't go back to places where I am served cold or tepid food that is supposed to be hot. I don't send anything back ever.

 

I may spend some time and effort on feedback with a mom and pop place I like and want to see them succeed where the error was a one-off. Chains do not get a second chance. I don't eat at those much anyway. I figure it's not my job to help you run your business, unless I already like you and care about you.

 

Cold breakfast food is particularly intolerable to me, and I can't think of a single local breakfast restaurant I've tried that serves properly hot food. IHOP and Perkins are especially egregious in this area. They serve their breakfasts on thick china platters, but don't preheat them, so even properly cooked and quickly served breakfasts give up their heat to these thermal sinks quite quickly. Such a pity, because if they were preheated, they'd be ideal for serving up eggs and pancakes.

 

Fortunately, breakfast foods are very easy and quick to cook at home, and I preheat my plates.

 

The only thing I dislike more than cold eggs is cold pasta, but I'm trying to broaden my horizons on that front with some of the Asian noodle preparations that are served cold. I have big, thick pasta bowls that I preheat for Italian pasta, and I expect, and sometimes get the same at some of out local restaurants. If they disappoint, I don't return.

 

At what one might call an upscale hotel I was once served cold (as in refrigerator temperature) hollandaise for breakfast.  I rather expect the hollandaise was left over from the night before.  All things considered I was rather disappointed.



#262 Deryn

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Posted 09 April 2015 - 11:31 AM

To me, there is a big difference between 'bringing something to the attention of' someone (the waitstaff in this case) and 'complaining'. I try to save the latter for those times when I use the former and am met with indifference or rudeness - since having to use the 'complaint' strategy to get results can ruin my meal as much as the offense that warranted it in the first place.

 

I can be very assertive, but, having been raised as a 'nice Canadian girl', my first approach, I know, can make me look like a patsy at times, especially when I dine in the US where people are often much more outspoken about everything. I know I have cringed when I have been out for dinner with a few American friends whose standard approach is complaint first - and not always in a quiet manner. They got results (and strangely, to me, were not thrown out but were kowtowed to for the rest of the meal) but that is just not my style. 

 

All that to note that, depending on where one roams, there can be quite a culture difference between north of the border and south of the border (and between big cities and country/small towns - and probably between genders as well) when it comes to what is standard/acceptable/desirable behaviour, how one gets what one wants and is paying for, in restaurants and other milieus.  


Edited by Deryn, 09 April 2015 - 11:32 AM.