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Kitchen Scale Recommendations, 2011 –

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#31 Mjx

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Posted 17 April 2011 - 02:27 AM

I have the Precision Digital scale mentioned several times above, and it's been flaking out lately. The weight constantly floats upwards when empty, and I have to tare it several times before it'll settle down. The batteries were over a year old, so I replaced them hoping that would solve the problem but no dice. I've checked the accuracy with some coins and it seems to be spot on, but it's still annoying and makes me doubt the readings. Any thoughts on what could be going on?


How old is the scale, and what sort of internal mechanism does it have?

If the mechanism includes a spring of any description (rather than sensors only), I suspect it has become fatigued, and I don't know that there is anything that can be done to fix that; I'm fairly certain that a sensor would have a defined life-span, too.

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#32 vice

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Posted 17 April 2011 - 08:30 AM

About 18 months old. It's the same inexpensive pocket scale several folks mention above (this one) - I would assume pressure sensors only.
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#33 ermintrude

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Posted 17 April 2011 - 10:10 AM

I got one and it works well, handy having the readout on the wall and it's a neat solution, one thing to note as it's infra red then scale does need to be vaguely pointing at the wall mounted section also loads of clutter round the scale cat prevent it working. That said i really like mine, looks good on the wall as clock, thermometer etc and does it's job as a scale well when needed.

Anyone recommend a good gram scale on sale in the UK ideally 0.01 resolution from 0 to 100g that takes ordinary batteries, my current one (0.1 resolution) needs 3 odd lithium ones I can't get so have to jury rig it with paper and tin foil and wrong size batteries to get it to work

Edited by ermintrude, 17 April 2011 - 10:17 AM.

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#34 Mjx

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Posted 17 April 2011 - 10:31 AM

About 18 months old. It's the same inexpensive pocket scale several folks mention above (this one) - I would assume pressure sensors only.


I notice that the specs mention that the scale updates every 200ms, perhaps some muck got in, which is affecting the sensor?

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#35 vice

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Posted 17 April 2011 - 05:22 PM

Entirely possible, as I'm pretty messy with it and use it a lot. I'll go over it with a fine-tooth comb and see if things improve.
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#36 Moopheus

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Posted 18 April 2011 - 04:33 AM

I've used a My Weigh KD-600 nearly every day for about six years, and it's worked well for everything I've needed it for. Now I am tempted by one of the newer models that has the baker's percentage feature, but even though it is not very expensive to so, I am reluctant to upgrade a piece of gear that still works just to get a new feature.
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#37 Honkman

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Posted 20 July 2011 - 11:22 PM

Our regular digital kitchen balance only measures in 5g increments. For recipes in Modernist Cuisine it is often necessary to measure ingredients in 100 mg increments. We are planning to buy an additional digital balance for that. So which one are people using since there are numerous available.

#38 Carlton

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Posted 21 July 2011 - 12:21 AM

I've been using the Escali L-125. It does .01g increments up to 125g. I've had good luck with it.

#39 PedroG

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Posted 22 July 2011 - 06:05 PM

Does anyone have experience with the American Weigh AMW-2000 Digital Bench Jewelry Food Kitchen Scale 2000 gram x 0.1g?
9V battery, optional AC. Platform 6x6".
Auto shut off might be a nuisance, but no customer review specified the auto shut off delay.
Definitely not as accurate as my antique model, but faster!
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#40 deepfryerdan

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Posted 26 July 2011 - 11:27 AM

My Taylor TE22 hasn't failed me yet. Stupid-ly simple to use, too.

#41 PedroG

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Posted 05 August 2011 - 05:08 PM

I finally bought a new 0.1g/500g kitchen scale: Soehnle Ultra 2.0. It comes with a 200g calibration weight and features an auto-calibration function.
With my old 1g/5000g Kuhn Rikon VC-10356 auto shut-off (1½ min) is a nuisance. The Soehnle Ultra 2.0 stays on for 4 minutes.
Below are the calibration results. With the 1g/5000g scale weighing just a few grams was virtually impossible.
Calibrating digital kitchen scales.jpg
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#42 Dexter

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Posted 26 November 2011 - 12:17 PM

Resurrecting this thread:

Any opinions on the best digital scales? Just managed to break mine in a move, and looking to replace it. Have several recommendations but all are several years old now. I've already got a nice jewelers scale for the properly small measurements, so am really looking for something that will work for more general duty.

#43 Mjx

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Posted 26 November 2011 - 12:28 PM

I'm extremely happy with the Jennings model I have (http://www.jscales.c...ages/cj4000.jpg). Apart from the accuracy, I like the fact that it has a cord (in case the battery dies, you have no replacements at hand, and it's Sunday, so all the shops are closed), and a great warranty. I definitely recommend it.


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#44 Shalmanese

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Posted 26 November 2011 - 03:59 PM

Cook's Illustrated rated EKS, Terrailon and Cuisinart as tops for electronic scales. I did not see any in this link that were rated by CI. They rated based on accuracy, precision (how is that different???), and design. In the design category they looked at things like being able to see the read-out with stuff on the weighing platform.


accuracy is about external consistency, precision is about internal consistency. If you had a scale that always read 10 grams over, then you would have an precise but inaccurate scale. If you had a scale that sometimes read 5 grams over and sometimes 5 grams under, you would have an accurate but imprecise scale.
PS: I am a guy.

#45 Dexter

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Posted 27 November 2011 - 01:02 PM

Mjx, which model do you have? I'm looking at the CJ-600 as a pretty good fit for my needs. (Single person, cooks for groups relatively infrequently). 20 year warranty is a very nice touch, I gotta' say, though their description doesn't say anything about being able to plug it in.

Thanks for the reply!

#46 torso

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Posted 11 December 2011 - 09:53 AM

I did a bit of kitchen scale research a while ago, so I thought I'd write what I discovered in case someone finds it useful. Sorry about the length (inexperienced poster warning). TL;DR buy a lab scale without auto zero tracking).

The price depends on the number of scale divisions. A scale with a capacity of 1kg in 1g increments can show 1000 steps. So can a scale with a 100g capacity with 0.1g precision, or 10kg capacity with 10g precision. (This is just examples; scales use more levels internally.) The scales use cushion (load cell) that is deformed by pressure, and the deformation is what is measured. All that is needed to change precision is to use a cushion with a different firmness, but increasing the range requires more sensitive electronics (and a higher quality cushion). That makes it cheaper to buy two scales with different precision if both precision and capacity is wanted (but not at the same time).

Most (all?) scales have overload protection, as excessive force would permanently deform the cushion. Even with this protection, overloading is still a problem. MyWeigh cites it as the most common source of fatal error. Even if the scale doesn't die from it, accuracy might degrade. Be careful with them, and never store anything on top of them.

It is normal for measured values to drift. This happens due to things that affect the internals (temperature, humidity, voltage fluctuations) and the thing being measured (evaporation, dust, air currents). I guess temperature affects the elasticity of the load cell. To quote the manual of my scale, it says that it requires 30 minutes "worming up". (It also comes with an AC adaptor to supply power from "mines".) The feature to combat this drift is generally called auto zero tracking (AZT).

AZT means that small measurement changes gets rounded off, and the tare value is updated. Any change in weight that too small to show on the display is discarded, which means the display will show a stable value even though the measured value changes over time. If the drift is faster than the scale updates the display, you can see the value change a little or run off a lot (which is what happened to an earlier poster in this thread). AZT may be fine if you're weighing discrete items (such as apples) or counting nails, but makes the scale useless for powders and slowly drizzling liquids.

When buying a scale, I made it a requirement that it should be possible to disable AZT. I keep it off all the time. Some people might find it disconcerting that the values changes every now and then, but I prefer that the scale doesn't hide these errors from me. The measurement error when adding items incrementally is reduced, clouds of powders settling on the surface isn't rounded off, and I can drizzle liquids as slowly as I want.

If you don't find a scale without AZT, there are some things that will reduce its effects. Higher precision is good, as it leads to smaller rounding errors. The second thing to look for is the display update rate. The faster the display updates, the more frequently it can introduce rounding errors. Some scales allow setting the AZT filtering level. Reducing it will make the display update less often, but you'll get better accuracy.

Kitchen scales falls into the bigger category bench scales. Don't restrict yourself to scales with "kitchen" in the name, as difference is just in visual appearance and advertising. If you want a quality scale, I recommend looking at the ones designed for laboratory use. Unlike kitchen scales, they generally come with a large number of features and an RS232 port. They are made in series with varying capacities and precision, but with identical design and features. Find a manufacturer that has the settings you need (no AZT or auto shut-off timer!) and pick the desired combination of capacity, precision, accurace and price. Stores usually only carry on or two from a series, and generally not the cheapest ones. I guess more research on where to buy those is needed.

Apart from the stove, I think the scale is the appliance I use the most in my kitchen. It's a lot easier than using measuring cups and spoons (and less to clean up afterwards). I've tried confining it in a cupboard, but it inevitably finds a way to escape within a day. I've used it twice today, but I haven't started making dinner yet. It has one downside: it beeps when turned on or off. I'm considering surgery. Or maybe I should just keep it on a permanent spot in the kitchen, always plugged in and all wormed up using the power from mines...

#47 tikidoc

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Posted 11 December 2011 - 11:59 AM

To my knowledge, there aren't any scales that use baker's percentages. You have to do the math yourself (super easy if you're working with metric units). I designed a baker's percentage user interface for MyWeigh a few years ago. They gave me a nice scale in exchange for my efforts, but it seems there wasn't enough demand for them to actually make the thing.


Actually, the MyWeigh KD-8000 does do baker's percentages. Weigh out the flour, then set it to baker's percentages, then everything after that will show up as percent of the flour's weight. Very easy. It's a good home scale, and costs under $40. http://www.amazon.co.../dp/B001NE0FU2. Another plus, no strange batteries to buy - it runs off AA batteries (or an optional power cord, which I don't have). I use mine a lot and it is still on the first set of batteries, after well over a year.

I got a small scale off ebay made for jewelry for small amounts, such as the salt, yeast, etc in bread.

#48 andiesenji

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Posted 11 December 2011 - 12:23 PM

I've had several KD scales, currently using a KD7000 and the KD8000 which I bought specifically because it has the Baker's Math/Percentage Weighing function.

I always check a new scale against my triple beam precision balance scale with certified hanger weights.
And from time to time I check the calibration using the old scale to be sure they are still correct and so far none of the KD scales has been inaccurate and they are in constant use.

I've found they are accurate even with very small amounts. I use disposable plastic "sample" cups for weighing spices and etc., I think a sleeve of 125 costs less than $2.00. A few years back I bought a case because I have many uses for them, not just in the kitchen. At that time the case price (still on the box) was 29.95 and there were 20 sleeves in the box.
I have a tray with stickers identifying the various ingredients and as I weigh them out, I put the cup on the sticker as that way it is easy to check the cups against the list to be sure I'm not missing anything.
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#49 ElsieD

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Posted 12 December 2011 - 07:24 AM

Andie, is this tray something you constructed? it sounds as though it would be a handy thing to have.

#50 andiesenji

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Posted 12 December 2011 - 03:12 PM

Andie, is this tray something you constructed? it sounds as though it would be a handy thing to have.


It's just a 15 x 20 inch bus tray on which I have put labels, leaving space for the size of the little containers I use, either the disposable cups or the little glass or metal ones used in commercial kitchens. I have stacks of them. If I'm doing a lot of baking, I use the disposables. If only one or two items, I just use the regular ones.

Ingredients tray.JPG

It's gotten a lot of use this past couple of weeks.

I have another tray for perishables - milk, butter, eggs, fruits and etc., currently it is in the fridge chilling some ingredients for later use.

Edited by andiesenji, 12 December 2011 - 03:15 PM.

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett
My blog:Books,Cooks,Gadgets&Gardening

#51 JoNorvelleWalker

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Posted 05 March 2013 - 11:20 PM

This is the scale I ended up ordering for measuring xanthan gum and such:

http://www.awscales....milligram-scale

 

I'll report back when I have tried it.



#52 JoNorvelleWalker

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Posted 08 March 2013 - 05:28 PM

I received my AWS GeminiPRO tonight.  Like Chris Hennes' rice, it's very cheesy, but not objectionably so.  It took much effort to get the battery compartment cover off nondestructively.  Batteries and calibration weights were supplied.  The problem is that readings jump around a lot.  I will try calibrating again after the scale has sat in one place for a while, to see if that makes a difference.  Cosmetically it looks rather nice for plastic, better than I might have expected.



#53 brianl

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Posted 09 March 2013 - 03:22 PM

I've found even breathing on the sensitive scales can alter their readings, and you have a very sensitive one.

 

In addition to calibration weights, I use coins to check my scales.  It's easy to find the exact weight of a coin for a given year (I cut a bit of slack due to wear and/or accumulated crud).

 

Thanks

 

Brian



#54 JoNorvelleWalker

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Posted 09 March 2013 - 06:55 PM

I'm about to do more than breathe on it.  I have the scale sitting on a two and one quarter inch thick slab of maple butcher block, as far from windows as I can get it (except maybe for the bathroom).  This is not a temperature controlled laboratory, but the temperature is 75 deg F.  The scale passes calibration.  Precision is about plus/minus one gram.  The supplied 10g weights measure between 9 and 11 grams.  I replaced the supplied AAA cells with no difference in performance.

 

On my analog kitchen scale with 5 gram divisions, both 10g calibration weights measure between 15 and 20 grams together.



#55 Ozcook

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Posted 10 March 2013 - 02:42 AM

I'm about to do more than breathe on it.  I have the scale sitting on a two and one quarter inch thick slab of maple butcher block, as far from windows as I can get it (except maybe for the bathroom).  This is not a temperature controlled laboratory, but the temperature is 75 deg F.  The scale passes calibration.  Precision is about plus/minus one gram.  The supplied 10g weights measure between 9 and 11 grams.  I replaced the supplied AAA cells with no difference in performance.

 

On my analog kitchen scale with 5 gram divisions, both 10g calibration weights measure between 15 and 20 grams together.

If I have understood your post correctly you are not happy with the accuracy of the AWS scale. Could you please confirm as I was also thinking of getting this model.  Thanks.



#56 JoNorvelleWalker

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Posted 10 March 2013 - 06:54 PM

I'm about to do more than breathe on it.  I have the scale sitting on a two and one quarter inch thick slab of maple butcher block, as far from windows as I can get it (except maybe for the bathroom).  This is not a temperature controlled laboratory, but the temperature is 75 deg F.  The scale passes calibration.  Precision is about plus/minus one gram.  The supplied 10g weights measure between 9 and 11 grams.  I replaced the supplied AAA cells with no difference in performance.

 

On my analog kitchen scale with 5 gram divisions, both 10g calibration weights measure between 15 and 20 grams together.

If I have understood your post correctly you are not happy with the accuracy of the AWS scale. Could you please confirm as I was also thinking of getting this model.  Thanks.

 

Correct.  My unit seems to be defective as best I can tell.  The scale looks reasonably nice and the feature set is OK (except possibly for the plastic pans).  I cannot recommend this model though since mine does not work for the intended purpose of measuring ingredients for recipes out of Modernist Cuisine at Home.  I have not yet contacted the dealer or AWS about the problem.



#57 Mjx

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Posted 11 March 2013 - 01:11 AM

Mjx, which model do you have? I'm looking at the CJ-600 as a pretty good fit for my needs. (Single person, cooks for groups relatively infrequently). 20 year warranty is a very nice touch, I gotta' say, though their description doesn't say anything about being able to plug it in.

Thanks for the reply!

 

I'm really sorry, I don't know how I missed your post from well over a year ago, but (although I'm certain you now have a scale) I have the CJ4000 model. Still love it. I now have my heart set on the JSVG20 unit.


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#58 takadi

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Posted 14 December 2013 - 08:43 PM

Looking for a scale that has .01 g resolution and the number of choices out there is staggering. Mixed reviews all over the place. Anyone have any recommendations? I'm looking for something that has at least 100 g capacity.  The price ranges on these make it difficult to tell which ones are actually good or junk. I've seen some 10 dollar ones get decent reviews and it makes the 50+ dollar ones look overpriced



#59 Robenco15

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Posted 14 December 2013 - 09:05 PM

How about this one?

 

http://www.amazon.co...eywords=aws-200

 

I asked for it for xmas and found out about it through the ChefSteps.com team. They recommend the 100g model through their shop. If it is good enough for them it is good enough for me.

 

But, unfortunately, I don't have any experience with it yet, sorry, but there are reviews!



#60 JoNorvelleWalker

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Posted 14 December 2013 - 09:43 PM

After a very bad experience I still don't have a digital scale.  I returned my AWS since it didn't work.  However the one you linked is a different model.







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