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Cooking with "Modernist Cuisine" (Part 1)

Modernist Cookbook

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#481 Chris Hennes

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Posted 05 April 2011 - 01:01 PM

Doh! What sort of store would one purchase glycerin at?

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#482 emannths

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Posted 05 April 2011 - 01:03 PM

Stand back everyone--I've got this one too! :-)

Pharmacy, apparently.

#483 Chris Hennes

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Posted 05 April 2011 - 01:19 PM

Perfect: the local CVS even sold it in this convenient applicator...

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#484 emannths

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Posted 05 April 2011 - 01:22 PM

Might want to be careful with that stuff: "This product generally produces bowel movement within 15 minutes to 1 hour."

#485 Chris Hennes

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Posted 05 April 2011 - 01:47 PM

It's used as a stool softener, when, uh, directly applied to the stool. I'm just guessing here, but perhaps it has a similar effect on the tomatoes?

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#486 Chris Hennes

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Posted 05 April 2011 - 02:06 PM

OK, just popped these beauties into the oven:
Posted Image

Wow, you should smell my house! Slow roasting tomatoes, garlic, and herbs... just about the most soulful food imaginable.

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#487 Amida0616

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Posted 05 April 2011 - 02:31 PM

I thought the hamburger called for vacuum compressed fresh tomatoes? or is that from a different recipe?

#488 jsmeeker

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Posted 05 April 2011 - 02:38 PM

Doh! What sort of store would one purchase glycerin at?



Stand back everyone--I've got this one too! :-)

Pharmacy, apparently.



Perfect: the local CVS even sold it in this convenient applicator...



Might want to be careful with that stuff: "This product generally produces bowel movement within 15 minutes to 1 hour."



It's used as a stool softener, when, uh, directly applied to the stool. I'm just guessing here, but perhaps it has a similar effect on the tomatoes?



:blink:

:hmmm:

:shock:

What have you gotten yourself into, Chris?


:laugh:

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#489 Chris Hennes

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Posted 05 April 2011 - 03:02 PM

I thought the hamburger called for vacuum compressed fresh tomatoes? or is that from a different recipe?

It does. This is the tomato confit, which is used as a component of the burger's glaze. I should note that I'm not making the exact burger in the book, though I'm getting pretty close. In particular, I am supplying an alternate source of the smokey flavor called for in the recipe.

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#490 nathanm

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Posted 05 April 2011 - 03:13 PM


I thought tallow was rendered suet.


Suet is [from] the fat around the kidneys, and renders harder and whiter than tallow, which comes from... elsewhere on the cow.

Fact is that we used rendered kidney fat for the recipe, and that is what we recommend.

Fat from other cuts will also work, but kidney fat is usually a bit stronger flavor.
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#491 Chris Amirault

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Posted 05 April 2011 - 05:52 PM

So here are the short ribs that have been cured, smoked, cooked in brine, and rested:

Posted Image

Off the bone and sliced:

Posted Image

Some Latvian rye bread from the European Deli on Hope St in Providence:

Posted Image

Along with some strong homemade mustard, great pickles from the deli and less-than-great slaw from same, the full meal:

Posted Image

I snuck another layer of pastrami onto the bread after this photo because -- wait for it: Best. Pastrami. Ever.

Like nearly everything in the book I've tried, this pastrami packs more flavor per molecule than anything I've ever had. It's like eating a dictionary definition of pastrami; it's so beefy that you realize, oh, yeah, that's right, pastrami is BEEF.

Part of it is probably the quality of the short ribs, which were from a nearby farm. Part of it was probably using short ribs instead of a brisket. But there's no question that the benefits of SV preparation are on full display here: it's hard to imagine a wisp of flavor making its way out of these short ribs.

The details of the finished product suit me just fine; I might bump the coriander and juniper a bit, cut back on the red pepper. But, really, this is small potatoes. If you had told me a year ago I would be making pastrami that rivals Katz's on the Lower East Side of New York, I'd have said you were nuts. But, honestly, I think that this is much, much better.
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#492 Chris Hennes

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Posted 05 April 2011 - 05:54 PM

So, I've mentioned a couple times that this stuff is prep work for "The Burger"—that's not quite true. I can't actually make The Burger owing to a spousal objection to mushrooms, and a lack of a chamber vac (or for that matter, tomatoes worth compressing in the first place). So rather, I am making the bun, burger, glaze, and cheese slice. Instead of a mushroom swiss burger, I'm making it a bacon swiss burger: no vegetation involved (lettuce or tomato). So I guess this is the Lite version of The Burger. I still tell myself I'm considering it a warmup round for when I can convince my wife that a) mushrooms are good, and b) a chamber vac is clearly a kitchen necessity.

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#493 Chris Hennes

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Posted 05 April 2011 - 05:57 PM

Posted Image
If you had told me a year ago I would be making pastrami that rivals Katz's on the Lower East Side of New York, I'd have said you were nuts. But, honestly, I think that this is much, much better.

So, when are you starting to take orders? Where does the line form?

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#494 jsmeeker

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Posted 05 April 2011 - 06:02 PM

Speaking of orders and take out and what not... How much yield can you get out of using small pieces of meat like a short rib? Do you thing you might try it with a larger cut. Like a brisket some day, to see how it compares?

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#495 Chris Amirault

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Posted 05 April 2011 - 06:04 PM

I'd love to try it with a good brisket, but that's nearly impossible to find around here for reasons I cannot understand: uneven quality, no deckle, on and on.

Yield is a good question; I'll try to measure next time. Because, oh yes, there will be a next time.
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#496 Chris Amirault

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Posted 05 April 2011 - 06:07 PM

So, I've mentioned a couple times that this stuff is prep work for "The Burger"—that's not quite true. I can't actually make The Burger owing to a spousal objection to mushrooms, and a lack of a chamber vac (or for that matter, tomatoes worth compressing in the first place). So rather, I am making the bun, burger, glaze, and cheese slice. Instead of a mushroom swiss burger, I'm making it a bacon swiss burger: no vegetation involved (lettuce or tomato). So I guess this is the Lite version of The Burger. I still tell myself I'm considering it a warmup round for when I can convince my wife that a) mushrooms are good, and b) a chamber vac is clearly a kitchen necessity.


Two points:

1. The mushroom ketchup is an umami bomb, more glutamate than mushroom per se. You might want to give it a go and see what she thinks of it. You will likely love it.

2. The intensity implied by nearly everything in the MC book is the only thing that makes this claim sensible: a burger subbing bacon for vegetables is the Lite version.
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#497 weinoo

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Posted 05 April 2011 - 06:07 PM

I'd love to try it with a good brisket, but that's nearly impossible to find around here for reasons I cannot understand: uneven quality, no deckle, on and on.

Yield is a good question; I'll try to measure next time. Because, oh yes, there will be a next time.

If you can't get a good brisket, then you definitely can't get a good navel, right?

Won't Whole Foods order you a whole brisket?
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#498 Chris Amirault

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Posted 05 April 2011 - 06:14 PM

WF has supplied wildly uneven briskets to this particular customer, sadly.
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#499 Chris Hennes

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Posted 05 April 2011 - 06:15 PM

1. The mushroom ketchup is an umami bomb, more glutamate than mushroom per se. You might want to give it a go and see what she thinks of it. You will likely love it.

Thoughts on substitutions for the cane vinegar and the barley malt syrup?

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#500 nickrey

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Posted 05 April 2011 - 06:16 PM

I snuck another layer of pastrami onto the bread after this photo because -- wait for it: Best. Pastrami. Ever.

Like nearly everything in the book I've tried, this pastrami packs more flavor per molecule than anything I've ever had. It's like eating a dictionary definition of pastrami; it's so beefy that you realize, oh, yeah, that's right, pastrami is BEEF.

Having made this with two different cuts now (a leanish round and beef cheek), I can state categorically that Chris is not exaggerating about the taste.

The cheek was a better texture: I suspect more similar to the ribs that Chris used.

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#501 weinoo

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Posted 05 April 2011 - 06:18 PM

WF has supplied wildly uneven briskets to this particular customer, sadly.

That sucks. Maybe it's time to hit Lobel's :wink: . A bit expensive, but I'll bet they're delicious.
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#502 Chris Amirault

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Posted 05 April 2011 - 06:35 PM

Thoughts on substitutions for the cane vinegar and the barley malt syrup?


I think I used white vinegar, and I definitely subbed in gum syrup for the barley malt syrup.
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#503 mkayahara

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Posted 05 April 2011 - 06:39 PM

I'm surprised to hear you're having that much trouble finding barley malt syrup... I thought it was something every health food store carried!

Edit: In fact, I've been surprised at how many "modernist" ingredients are most easily found at health food stores: xanthan gum, xylitol, agave syrup, etc. Which is partly why it's so amusing to hear people decry the "evil food additives" being pushed by proponents of modernist cuisine.

Edited by mkayahara, 05 April 2011 - 06:41 PM.

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#504 Chris Amirault

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Posted 05 April 2011 - 07:10 PM

Having made this with two different cuts now (a leanish round and beef cheek), I can state categorically that Chris is not exaggerating about the taste.


Nick, what kind of wood did you use to smoke it? I used applewood, which turned out very well. I think hickory, the other choice I have on hand, would have been a bit too much.
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#505 ChrisZ

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Posted 05 April 2011 - 09:04 PM

Thoughts on substitutions for the cane vinegar and the barley malt syrup?


I have a jar of barley malt syrup I bought for a specific recipe, it smells like vegemite/promite or even Guinness but has the consistency of liquid glucose. I found it in a local deli. I have often wondered if it is the same as maltose syrup?

(and I'm thrilled that my copy of Modernist Cuisine has shipped from Amazon at a time when the Australian dollar is at a record high. I interpret this as karma, and a cosmic sign that the universe intended me to own it...)

#506 Chris Hennes

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Posted 05 April 2011 - 09:22 PM

Considering the massive complexity of the mushroom ketchup, I guess I just won't stress overmuch about those two ingredients, though I'll have to hunt them down for round two. I just ran to the store (at 10pm) to get the mushrooms, so I guess I'm in for the ketchup. But I'm still replacing the veg. with bacon.

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#507 emannths

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Posted 05 April 2011 - 10:14 PM

How about getting either a) malt extract from a homebrew supply store, or b) powdered malt extract used in baking?

Ooo! Or boil down some Malta!

Edited by emannths, 05 April 2011 - 10:15 PM.


#508 nickrey

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Posted 05 April 2011 - 10:32 PM

Having made this with two different cuts now (a leanish round and beef cheek), I can state categorically that Chris is not exaggerating about the taste.


Nick, what kind of wood did you use to smoke it? I used applewood, which turned out very well. I think hickory, the other choice I have on hand, would have been a bit too much.

I've been using a blend of mesquite and apple woodchips. I agree that hickory would be too much.

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#509 Mjx

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Posted 06 April 2011 - 12:57 AM

OK, just popped these beauties into the oven:
Posted Image

Wow, you should smell my house! Slow roasting tomatoes, garlic, and herbs... just about the most soulful food imaginable.


Damn, those are gorgeous...




I thought tallow was rendered suet.


Suet is [from] the fat around the kidneys, and renders harder and whiter than tallow, which comes from... elsewhere on the cow.

Fact is that we used rendered kidney fat for the recipe, and that is what we recommend.

Fat from other cuts will also work, but kidney fat is usually a bit stronger flavor.


If it's rendered carefully (very slowly, over low heat, so you hold off on the Maillard reaction), kidney fat/suet is virtually flavourless. Not hearsay: I've rendered suet a couple of times, and have a large chunk of it in the freezer.

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#510 pazzaglia

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Posted 06 April 2011 - 03:54 AM

My ode to Modernist Cuisine, in style and content...

Modernist Soft, Medium and Hard "Boiled" Eggs in the pressure cooker
Posted Image

Apologies, and utmost respect to the authors if they already covered pressure cooking eggs in their tome! Thank for sharing so many previews, photos and discussions about the book on these forums.

I ate them up and hope to one day have the opportunity to peruse a copy of the book and read about your pressure cooker/autoclave experiments.

Ciao!

L

Edited by pazzaglia, 06 April 2011 - 03:57 AM.

hip pressure cooking - making pressure cooking hip, one recipe at a time!






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