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Coffee grinders for drip


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18 replies to this topic

#1 edwardsboi

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Posted 25 January 2011 - 02:11 PM

What would you suggest for a coffee grinder for coffee that will exclusively be drip?

I've heard that burr grinders are superior to blade grinders, but will they still make a difference for drip?

For drip coffee, do I want to buy the most expensive grinder that I can afford like I would with espresso? Or, should I concentrate on other things like the coffee machine or coffee beans instead of the grinder?

If there was a hierachy of importance for drip coffee, where would the grinder fall on that list?

#2 weinoo

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Posted 25 January 2011 - 02:15 PM

I think the grinder is the most important piece of equipment that you'll own.
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#3 Richard Kilgore

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Posted 25 January 2011 - 03:18 PM

I think that for drip, and only if drip is all you do and plan to do in the near term, then the beans are the most important, the drip equipment as second and the grinder third. A blade grinder used properly should be adequate. If, however, you may want to try the French Press method, then a good burr grinder will make a difference.

A burr grinder may make a difference if you are using a high end drip brewer ($200 - $250 range); I don't know, but maybe someone else here does.

My 2 cents, from a former heavy coffee drinker.

#4 weinoo

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Posted 25 January 2011 - 03:26 PM

Of course the beans (freshly roasted) and the water are important. But I don't think I'd define them as equipment; rather, I'd define them as the raw materials. They are the variable cost as well, whereas the grinder and the maker are the fixed cost.
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#5 Foodietopo

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Posted 25 January 2011 - 03:34 PM

I am asking myself pretty much the same question. Should I invest in a really expensive grinder or buy a Hario ceramic grinder for less than 30$ in Japan?

I already use a massive Melitta hand grinder on weekend with great success, but I don't have a grinder for my second home, so I was wondering if I should invest in a fancy electric grinder. I also only use the drip method.

If anybody has any experience with the Hario grinder, I would be happy to hear about it.

@edwardsboi What is your brewing method?
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#6 Will

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Posted 25 January 2011 - 03:40 PM

If anybody has any experience with the Hario grinder, I would be happy to hear about it.

I got my girlfriend the Hario hand grinder for Christmas (it seemed like the best thing available without spending insane amounts of money for something we don't use often), and she seems to really like it, though she has no basis for comparison. She uses it mostly for Viet style coffee. It is a little time / labor intensive, but she doesn't seem to mind so far. It took her some trial and error to get the right size grounds.

#7 weinoo

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Posted 25 January 2011 - 03:59 PM

Check out the Baratza refurbished grinders...click here.
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#8 Crouton

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Posted 25 January 2011 - 06:27 PM

Check out the Baratza refurbished grinders...click here.



I've used the Maestro and the Kitchenaid pro line... The Maestro feels cheap and made of plastic just like your typical retail chain grinder, but does grind well. The kitchenaid is built like an absolute tank and is, well, beautiful.

kitchenaid Pro Line

Edited by Crouton, 25 January 2011 - 06:31 PM.


#9 Edward J

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Posted 25 January 2011 - 07:29 PM

Beans are probably the most important factor, followed by water quality, followed by water temperature, followed by the grind, followed by the filter.

With drip, I tend to go low tech, and my favorite grinder is the old fashioned hand cranked grinder-in-a-box-with-drawer type. No shrill universal motor whine early in the morning, no more grinder dying on me after 3 mths and then haunting the Mal-warts or hardware stores for a new one to break down again.

Truly European style is to have a wall mounted hand crank grinder, nicely fixed to the wall. However, these are virtually impossible to obtain in N. America. I "Improved" on my grinder by adding a simple piece of wood.

In order to hand crank, you need one hand on the box and one hand to crank. I screwed on a small piece of wood--about 4" wide by 16" long, to the bottom of the grinder, and---- I sit on it. While listening to the news, I pull out a stool, stick the board on the seat, sit down, and crank, and when done, empty the drawer and hang up the whole assemby.

#10 weinoo

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Posted 25 January 2011 - 10:00 PM

In order to hand crank, you need one hand on the box and one hand to crank. I screwed on a small piece of wood--about 4" wide by 16" long, to the bottom of the grinder, and---- I sit on it. While listening to the news, I pull out a stool, stick the board on the seat, sit down, and crank, and when done, empty the drawer and hang up the whole assemby.

When I grind, I actually like to renovate the kitchen.
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#11 KarenDW

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Posted 26 January 2011 - 01:45 AM

I use a Baratza Maestro. It's 2 yrs old and still going strong, after daily use. Added benefit... if I need to grind 4 lbs of coffee for a party... the machine is up to the task.
But in a previous life, for my pour-over filter coffee, I thought an inexpensive blade grinder was completely ok.
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#12 Ian McCarthy

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Posted 05 March 2011 - 01:55 PM

I'm crazy about the Hario skerton mill. Amazing grind consistency, infinite adjustments, quality burrs, hand-powered, Portable, cheap. Unless I am grinding by the pound, this is my first choice.

#13 scubadoo97

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Posted 05 March 2011 - 04:46 PM

I use a Baratza Maestro. It's 2 yrs old and still going strong, after daily use. Added benefit... if I need to grind 4 lbs of coffee for a party... the machine is up to the task.
But in a previous life, for my pour-over filter coffee, I thought an inexpensive blade grinder was completely ok.


I have a Solis Maestro Plus which is around 7-8 yrs old and still grinds the morning brew for drip. Not great for espresso but for other methods of brew it's totally adequate. The Plus has a heavy base so it feels more substantial than the basic Maestro. One thing that also is quite nice on these grinders is no static or very little. It doesn't make a mess like other grinders.

#14 mcohen

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Posted 14 March 2011 - 06:37 PM

I use a Baratza Maestro. It's 2 yrs old and still going strong, after daily use. Added benefit... if I need to grind 4 lbs of coffee for a party... the machine is up to the task.
But in a previous life, for my pour-over filter coffee, I thought an inexpensive blade grinder was completely ok.


So, do you think a Baratza really makes a difference for drip or is a bland grinder okay?

#15 scubadoo97

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Posted 15 March 2011 - 05:23 AM


I use a Baratza Maestro. It's 2 yrs old and still going strong, after daily use. Added benefit... if I need to grind 4 lbs of coffee for a party... the machine is up to the task.
But in a previous life, for my pour-over filter coffee, I thought an inexpensive blade grinder was completely ok.


So, do you think a Baratza really makes a difference for drip or is a bland grinder okay?


I take a blade grinder with me when we travel and it works okay to get a good cup of coffee in a hotel room with my fresh roasted beans but the grind consistency is far superior with a burr grinder like the Maestro. I do think that makes a better cup but grinding good beans on demand with a blade grinder is still far superior than buying preground coffee.

#16 Intellidepth

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Posted 10 May 2011 - 04:40 AM

Good grinder first. Always. Provides consistency in your brew. You can play with your beans - but your grinder's the fixture that those beans rely on to get the best out of them before water's even hit them.

#17 Peter the eater

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Posted 10 May 2011 - 05:20 AM

A blade grinder is excellent for drip coffee at home. If you buy a burr grinder, don't get this one. The reviews below the image explain why this kind of burr grinder is FAR inferior to a blade.
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#18 BennyAdeline

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Posted 11 May 2011 - 06:55 AM

The Hario Skerton works great.It creates a little invigorating workout in the morning as well as a nice ritual. I ditched my high-end automatic drip and moved to the Hario V60 funnel paired with the Hario Bouno Kettle. I am enjoying my coffee 100x more now.

#19 Zachary

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Posted 11 May 2011 - 07:28 AM

I love my Solis Maestro Plus - bought it for $150 five years ago from Whole Latte Love, use it every day, clean it once a week (which takes 10 minutes). It's not for espresso, but it's one of the best grinders I know for drip. I use it for French Press, V60, and Aeropress, and it handles them all well.

Your grinder is the most important part of your coffee besides the water. Grind consistency makes a huge difference in the quality of your coffee. As a matter of fact, here's my morning routine... you're going to need a instant read thermometer, a gram and ounce scale, and a French Press:

1. Weigh out 48 g. of coffee beans, preferably freshly roasted (i.e. within 2 weeks). Don't know when your beans were roasted? Find a new source.
2. Heat good water in a kettle to between 200 F and 205 F. This you can play with a bit... some coffees like 200, some like 204.
3. Once the water is at temp, pour a bit into the French Press, a thermal carafe and a mug to heat them. Swirl and dump the water.
4. Grind your coffee. I'm usually 2-3 ticks back from the coarsest setting on my Solis - this can vary due to humidity, oilyness of beans, and other factors.
5. Add the coffee to the bottom of the French Press, place the press on your scale again, switch to ounces and tare it, then weigh out 12 ounces of water into the Press.
6. Stir the water and coffee. You should see bloom as CO2 is liberated from the grounds. Add the remaining 12 ounces of water, put the filter assembly on top, and wait for 3:30.
7. After three and a half minutes have gone by, slowly press the filter down, trapping the coffee in the bottom. Immediately pour the coffee into the thermal carafe.
8. Drink coffee. Mmmmmmm.

Thanks,

Zachary