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Pressure Cookers: 2011 and beyond


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#481 ojisan

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Posted 04 October 2013 - 06:54 PM

To clarify: Amazon does not sell Fissler directly (Amazon is not an authorized reseller). Instead, 3rd party vendors sell Fisslers through Amazon, and Amazon provides fulfillment for some of them. My point is that many of the vendors are not authorized Fissler dealers, therefore no warranty.


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#482 JoNorvelleWalker

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Posted 04 October 2013 - 07:12 PM

I was ready to return the Fissler, but decided to first try Laura's test:

 

- 1 C. chickpeas (purchased '09), soaked 8 hrs.

- 4 C. water; cooked at high pressure, 13 min.

- natural release, 13 min.

 

- result: ceci's were intact; texture was creamy soft, like a baked potato; overcooked?

- about 3 C. liquid left over

 

Anyone else tried this test?

 

To my taste the 13 minute chickpeas are over cooked.  Great flavor though.  There were maybe some differences between our two tests.

 

My chickpeas (Goya brand) were purchased yesterday.

 

The chickpeas were soaked in unsalted water about 18 hours.  I had hoped to have the soak time closer to 8 hours, but one has to make ice cream when one can.

 

I followed the advice of Modernist Cuisine to vent for about 30 seconds at pressure to expel remaining air, to allow the pot to reach full temperature.  In other words even if a pot is at 15 PSI pressure and there is any air inside, the temperature will never reach 250 deg F.

 

I believe I measured the 13 minute cooking time accurately by my watch.  However I did not time the natural release as carefully (for one thing, I was responding to your post above).  My release time was about 13 or 14 minutes.

 

 

Now I have to decide how to cook the other half of the chickpeas.  I certainly don't want to go to 22 minutes!



#483 JoNorvelleWalker

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Posted 04 October 2013 - 07:19 PM

To clarify: Amazon does not sell Fissler directly (Amazon is not an authorized reseller). Instead, 3rd party vendors sell Fisslers through Amazon, and Amazon provides fulfillment for some of them. My point is that many of the vendors are not authorized Fissler dealers, therefore no warranty.

 

Sorry I misunderstood.  You might want to contact Amazon if your dealer was not authorized.



#484 pazzaglia

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Posted 04 October 2013 - 10:23 PM

Well, I am quite puzzled.  Even an 11psi InstantPot gives almost al-dente chickpeas at 13 minutes.  It APPEARS that you may not have to make time adjustments with your Vitaquick - for some reason.  But now you know if anything comes out under-done to just add more time.

 

I'm going to ask Fissler if they'll send me a U.S. model to test myself (I only have the Euro one).  All of the magic happens in the valve so I definitely want to know from them more about the specs of the US vs. EU valves  - with more detail than what is written in the manual to pass a UL certification.

 

Ciao,

 

L


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#485 pazzaglia

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Posted 04 October 2013 - 10:40 PM

Take note if you purchase your Fissler from Amazon...

 

I contacted Fissler via their US website to inquire about their warranty, and specifically to verify an Amazon review I came across. Here is their reply:

 

Thank you for your response.

The Vitaquick has a limited lifetime warranty....

 

However, the vendor of Amazon, [xxxxx] does not seem to be an authorized dealer.

Please check our website www.fisslerusa.com and to go the Where to Buy tab for a list of authorized dealers.

If products are purchased from an unauthorized dealer, the warranty is not valid.

 

I don't know if other manufacturers (Kuhn Rikon, etc.) have the same policy.

 

The Fissler Vitaquick  manual it says 3-year warranty on defective parts and 10-year guarantee that they will keep replacement parts around for you.  There is nothing written there about it being void if you bought it from an UN-authorized dealer or that it's a lifetime warranty. 

 

Generally the warranty travels with the item, even it's used.  I don't know about Germany but in Austria and Italy when you buy used electronics the seller will tell you how much time is left on the warranty and also give you the original receipt and info so that it can be used if needed. So it is also transferable.

 

If you had a busted or defective Vitaquick I would recommend pushing the issue and consulting an attorney to get more details about whether a manufacturer can refuse to fix or replace a defective item based on who sold it.  No matter what route it took to your house - it originated from their factory.

 

Ciao,

 

L


Edited by pazzaglia, 04 October 2013 - 10:50 PM.

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#486 JoNorvelleWalker

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Posted 04 October 2013 - 11:22 PM

The photocopied manual Fissler sent me makes no mention of a lifetime warranty and also no mention of the requirement of purchase from an authorized dealer.

 

I'm not sure, but the US importer may be trying to protect themselves from graymarket goods -- that is Fissler pressure cookers not handled by the importer, with which the importer understandably does not want to get stuck for warranty.  Whether it's legal or not I have no idea, but it makes sense from the importer's viewpoint.

 

Possibly the pots from non-authorized dealers are not stamped with US on the lid?

 

 

Or, it may just be more evidence of lack of communication on the part of Fissler.


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#487 ojisan

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Posted 05 October 2013 - 09:04 AM

Here is Fissler's warranty info: http://www.fisslerus...ler/index04.php

 

"All Fissler products must be purchased from an Authorized Dealer in the United States or Canada in order for Fissler USA to honor any 

manufacturer’s warranties."

 

I believe Roland (the US distributor) requires a copy of your original receipt to verify the retailer for warranty work. I assume if you purchase a greymarket Fissler, the warranty would be covered by the factory in Germany.

 

Nikon USA's policy is the same. Only cameras/lenses imported by Nikon USA are covered in the US. If greymarket, they won't touch it, and you'll have to send it to Japan for international warranty service.


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#488 JoNorvelleWalker

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Posted 14 October 2013 - 11:55 PM

When you're done you can make yourself hummus and pasta e ceci.

 

Indeed!  Now that I've prepared both dishes I continue to be very pleased with my Fissler set, whatever the real pressure may turn out to be.  The tapered shape is wonderful for working in, and clean up is very easy.

 

And thank you for the pasta e ceci recipe!  One minor note on the ingredients, weight would have been helpful for the pasta measurment, rather than dry volume.  I used 4 oz.



#489 ojisan

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Posted 20 October 2013 - 02:38 PM

To clarify: Amazon does not sell Fissler directly (Amazon is not an authorized reseller). Instead, 3rd party vendors sell Fisslers through Amazon, and Amazon provides fulfillment for some of them. My point is that many of the vendors are not authorized Fissler dealers, therefore no warranty.

 

Amazon refused to publish my review of the Fissler, which included the following:

 

Check Fissler's website to verify their U.S. authorized resellers, which is important because "All Fissler products must be purchased from an Authorized Dealer in the United States or Canada in order for Fissler USA to honor any manufacturer's warranties."

 

Most of Amazon's vendors are not authorized Fissler dealers, including a few who claim to be.


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#490 DiggingDogFarm

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Posted 20 October 2013 - 03:34 PM

That's scandalous!


~Martin
 
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#491 DiggingDogFarm

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Posted 08 November 2013 - 10:49 AM

I've been using the hawkins models stainless stell PCs for years now, I've never tried anything else. It seems like the favorites mentioned in this thread are so much more expensive. I'm wondering if anyone else out there can compare the hawkins to some of the fancier ones... I'm just wondering what I'm missing out on if anything, as I PC daily and any improvement is always welcome.

Thanks & Happy New Years!

 

No, I don't think that you're missing out on anything.

From a practical and utilitarian standpoint a Hawkins is an excellent value.

If you're as comfortable with Hawkins as I am, there's really no good reason to go "fancy."

 

Another plus: All Hawkins stainless steel pressure cookers made since April 2011 are induction compatible.


Edited by DiggingDogFarm, 08 November 2013 - 11:16 AM.

~Martin
 
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#492 JoNorvelleWalker

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Posted 10 November 2013 - 08:04 PM

I want to make it crystal clear that I'm not holding anything against ATK or Fissler. 

 

I personally reported chipping and splitting handles directly to Fissler in 2012 - for their new model someone wrote an amazon review and posted photos of their handles chipping and breaking.

 

Both in this forum and on amazon reviews customers reported getting the wrong manual with the pressure cooker, earlier a participant also even quoted an email to customer support. 

 

The Fissler U.S. manual states, and Fissler product manager confirmed,  to me personally the U.S. Vitaquick pressure cooker operates at 60kpa.

 

As far as America's Test Kitchen is concerned, they reported measuring a pressure cooker reaching a temperature level that is not technically possible given the information the manufacturer themselves has published about that pressure cooker. You can calculate if this information is correct yourself by plugging in 60kpa into the Atonine equation and working out the temperature it equates to.

 

I do fault ATK for putting out a cookbook with cooking times that are vastly different from those that have been published and tested elsewhere.  I am not the first or only critic of their reviews another pressure cooker expert published an entire article about the flaws of ATK's reviews when they published them 1996.

 

I have open, up-front and completely honest and transparent in my interactions here and elsewhere - my username is my real last name.  I have nothing to hide and no official cookbook to sell until mine is published next year.

 

One reason I do not fully trust Cook's Illustrated is that they seldom list their methods.  Just how did they measure 253 degrees for the Fissler?  I decided to do my own experiment while cooking up some oatmeal and tomato sauce tonight.  For measuring temperature I used a Thermax 06SMCMRNGL4C02PK 6 level irreversible temperature indicator on the lid of the jar of tomato sauce.  Each level will record if its temperature has been reached or exceeded, accurate to +/- 1 deg C.

 

The particular Thermax I used has indicators for 99/210, 104/219. 110/230, 116/241, 121/250, and 127/261 deg C/F.  All indicators up to and including 121/250 tripped.  The 127/261 indicator did not.

 

Thus I conclude my Fissler reached at least 120 deg C (248 deg F).  It may have reached 253 deg F, but I do not have the technology for measuring.

 

If you are wondering, dinner tonight is pasta e ceci.



#493 pazzaglia

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Posted 10 November 2013 - 11:22 PM

One reason I do not fully trust Cook's Illustrated is that they seldom list their methods.  Just how did they measure 253 degrees for the Fissler?  I decided to do my own experiment while cooking up some oatmeal and tomato sauce tonight.  For measuring temperature I used a Thermax 06SMCMRNGL4C02PK 6 level irreversible temperature indicator on the lid of the jar of tomato sauce.  Each level will record if its temperature has been reached or exceeded, accurate to +/- 1 deg C.
 
The particular Thermax I used has indicators for 99/210, 104/219. 110/230, 116/241, 121/250, and 127/261 deg C/F.  All indicators up to and including 121/250 tripped.  The 127/261 indicator did not.
 
Thus I conclude my Fissler reached at least 120 deg C (248 deg F).  It may have reached 253 deg F, but I do not have the technology for measuring.
 
If you are wondering, dinner tonight is pasta e ceci.


That's a very creative set-up Jo, but a jar and lid can conduct heat directly from the base of the cooker. Even if the jar is on a trivet the heat will come from the trivet/steamer basket, to the jar, and lid.

ATK's video about the reviews very briefly flashed a remote logging thermometer. Though they were talking about stove top pressure cookers, they showed a sine graph that could only be achieved in an Electric cooker -looks better on camera than a line going straight up and flat. There is no information written or recorded on HOW they used that thermometer for their tests.

 

Shortly after they published their reviews I wrote ATK and asked what methods they used for their tests and received no answer.

I have a remote logging thermometer (which measures temperatures every 10 seconds up to 125c), a sling that keeps the thermometer suspended in water without touching any heat-conducive elements, and developed a testing routine that includes calibration at 100C before the test begins.

 

A US Fissler Vitaquick just arrived at my door via express courier so as soon as time permits I will be doing my own measurements.

I'll gladly share my results and testing procedure here, in case anyone is interested in reading or re-producing them.

 

ATK has the veneer of respectability but talk to an alumnus and you get a different story. ATK rips- off recipes without attribution and in general is a bit shady.

 

Very interesting info!

Ciao,

L


hip pressure cooking - making pressure cooking hip, one recipe at a time!


#494 JoNorvelleWalker

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Posted 10 November 2013 - 11:58 PM

 

One reason I do not fully trust Cook's Illustrated is that they seldom list their methods.  Just how did they measure 253 degrees for the Fissler?  I decided to do my own experiment while cooking up some oatmeal and tomato sauce tonight.  For measuring temperature I used a Thermax 06SMCMRNGL4C02PK 6 level irreversible temperature indicator on the lid of the jar of tomato sauce.  Each level will record if its temperature has been reached or exceeded, accurate to +/- 1 deg C.
 
The particular Thermax I used has indicators for 99/210, 104/219. 110/230, 116/241, 121/250, and 127/261 deg C/F.  All indicators up to and including 121/250 tripped.  The 127/261 indicator did not.
 
Thus I conclude my Fissler reached at least 120 deg C (248 deg F).  It may have reached 253 deg F, but I do not have the technology for measuring.
 
If you are wondering, dinner tonight is pasta e ceci.


That's a very creative set-up Jo, but a jar and lid can conduct heat directly from the base of the cooker. Even if the jar is on a trivet the heat will come from the trivet/steamer basket, to the jar, and lid.

ATK's video about the reviews very briefly flashed a remote logging thermometer. Though they were talking about stove top pressure cookers, they showed a sine graph that could only be achieved in an Electric cooker -looks better on camera than a line going straight up and flat. There is no information written or recorded on HOW they used that thermometer for their tests.

 

Shortly after they published their reviews I wrote ATK and asked what methods they used for their tests and received no answer.

I have a remote logging thermometer (which measures temperatures every 10 seconds up to 125c), a sling that keeps the thermometer suspended in water without touching any heat-conducive elements, and developed a testing routine that includes calibration at 100C before the test begins.

 

A US Fissler Vitaquick just arrived at my door via express courier so as soon as time permits I will be doing my own measurements.

I'll gladly share my results and testing procedure here, in case anyone is interested in reading or re-producing them.

 

ATK has the veneer of respectability but talk to an alumnus and you get a different story. ATK rips- off recipes without attribution and in general is a bit shady.

 

Very interesting info!

Ciao,

L

 

 

The jars were on the Fissler steamer insert.  It's been many decades since I took thermodynamics, however I suspect conduction from the base of the cooker was negligible.  If the jar lid and the Thermax were heating by conduction from the base, so would be the food in the jar.  Please tell us more about the measuring equipment you use.



#495 pazzaglia

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Posted 11 November 2013 - 01:23 AM


The jars were on the Fissler steamer insert.  It's been many decades since I took thermodynamics, however I suspect conduction from the base of the cooker was negligible.  If the jar lid and the Thermax were heating by conduction from the base, so would be the food in the jar.  Please tell us more about the measuring equipment you use.

 

 

Here is a chart that shows that stainless steel, pyrex glass and aluminum have a much higher conductivity than water:
http://www.engineeri...vity-d_429.html

 

However, your test and set-up is a likely scenario of how ATK measured temperature in their pressure cookers. I don't know enough about chemistry to comment on whether the acidity of a tomato sauce could further influence conductivity.

 

I'm taking measurements of water under pressure because what interests me is the temperature at which the food cooks not the temperature of the pressure cooker base nor the steam above the food.

 

I'm in the middle of a big project now, but will post photos of the sling and, once tested, charts from the tests and my testing procedure when I get some free time.

 

In the meantime, here are the specs of my remote data logger:
http://www.lascarele...?datalogger=382

Ciao,

 

L


Edited by pazzaglia, 11 November 2013 - 01:24 AM.

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#496 simplycumin

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Posted 14 November 2013 - 09:40 AM

This is all very exciting.  I feel like I'm about to read the final "reveal" of a mystery novel.

 

I got fed up with the uncertainty around the actual specs of the Fissler and got a 5L KR Top model on sale.  :(

 

Shame on Fissler for allowing this situation to persist for so long.  Maybe if the North American operations were run by Fissler itself (like KR does) instead of depending on one distributor, the situation would be a different.


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#497 Earthlark

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Posted 21 November 2013 - 04:22 PM

 

This is all very exciting.  I feel like I'm about to read the final "reveal" of a mystery novel.

 

Right on.

Like JoNorvelleWalker, after much research (but apparently not enough), I too finally decided on the large Fissler Quatro Set (and received it today), but after reading with some trepidation that it only gets up to 60 kPa, I have been trying to figure out if that is indeed the case, and if so, if I should send it back.  So I'm looking forward to seeing the results!  :)



#498 ojisan

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Posted 21 November 2013 - 06:31 PM

Shame on Fissler for allowing this situation to persist for so long.  Maybe if the North American operations were run by Fissler itself (like KR does) instead of depending on one distributor, the situation would be a different.

 

Kuhn Rikon has the same policy - warranty is valid only if purchased from an authorized dealer:

 

Thank you for your inquiry. Our warranty will be valid if purchased from an authorized retailer; Amazon is one but their 3rd party vendors are not. If you want to provide name of the vendor you are looking to purchase it from, I can let you know if they have an account with us.

 

Regards,

Jill Stroup
Office Manager – Kuhn Rikon Corp.


Edited by ojisan, 21 November 2013 - 06:31 PM.

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#499 JoNorvelleWalker

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Posted 21 November 2013 - 07:51 PM

Right on.

Like JoNorvelleWalker, after much research (but apparently not enough), I too finally decided on the large Fissler Quatro Set (and received it today), but after reading with some trepidation that it only gets up to 60 kPa, I have been trying to figure out if that is indeed the case, and if so, if I should send it back.  So I'm looking forward to seeing the results!  :)

 

 

I am still happy with my Fissler purchase.  I am convinced the temperature of mine goes up to at least 250 deg F.  I use mine a lot and cooked with it as recently as this afternoon.  I wish they would just release a version of the lid rated at 15 PSI and be done with it (and give it to their long suffering US customers at no cost).  If 60 kPa is when the second white bar begins to show, it does not bother me a bit, as long as not less than 15 PSI is when the relief valve opens.

 

Note for most pressure cooker recipes Modernist Cuisine calls for venting the pot at pressure for (if I remember correctly) 30 to 45 seconds to remove as much air as possible.



#500 Earthlark

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Posted 22 November 2013 - 08:24 PM

I wish they would just release a version of the lid rated at 15 PSI and be done with it (and give it to their long suffering US customers at no cost).

 

Ha, wouldn't that be nice... but... :)

 

If 60 kPa is when the second white bar begins to show...

 

Thanks for the update on your satisfaction level and the tip, Jo.  I was kind of wondering if the 60 kPa was, as you said, just as the second white bar begins to show.  However, seems like a long way to go from the first sliver of the white bar to a bit past it to get to 100 kPa, but maybe not...  If their PC does reach "15 psi", it seems kind of crazy that Fissler wouldn't market a 15 psi-capable product as such, especially in the US.  Maybe the US marketing team didn't do enough research?  (Pazzaglia alluded to a lack of research before with regard the US team concluding that Americans would be confused by a dial-setting.)  It'd be equally strange, though, if they created such a low-pressure model for the US market, unless it was for a niche market.

Hm, maybe the factory is on Zugspitze (the highest peak in Germany) and that's why their claimed pressure is so low.  That would put 15 psi a bit closer to the 8.7 psi stated in the manual.  :)

 

It's not much help since I don't have precise equipment (electric glass-top), but I got the same results as you guys doing the chick pea test.  Took about 6.5 minutes for room temp water and pot to reach the second white ring.  (Stove was warm, but not so much that one couldn't leave a hand on it.)  Started 13-min timer.  Vented for about 1.5 minutes as glass-top cooled, then sat about middle of the second white ring for the remainder of the 13 min.  I released the pressure right away just to see if they would still be cooked.  Turned out soft (not al-dente, not mushy).  Anyway, like I said, though, pretty imprecise experiment.

Btw, just for kicks, I emailed the US branch (if for nothing more than to insinuate that there is a definite problem somewhere) and received the cookie-cutter response that ojisan received:

"The Vitaquick operates at 9-11 PSI on the low setting and 13-15 PSI on the high setting.  At normal altitude, it would be 11 and 15.  Cook's Illustrated and America's Test Kitchen recently tested all pressure cookers in the US and have found that only the Vitaquick actually reaches 15 PSI under pressure."



#501 pazzaglia

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Posted 23 November 2013 - 03:31 AM

OK, I got a chance to run the test this morning, and my findings are that the US Vitaquick’s operating pressure is consistent with what is printed in their manual 60kpa (8.7psi).

 

The maximum temperature achieved while operating the US Vitaquick cooker at high pressure during my test was 116.6C (about 240F) –  just a tad higher than the US Fissler Vitaquick manual 's note that high pressure is "approx. 237F". My results differ from what America’s Test Kitchen reportedly achieved 250F (121.1C).

 

I’m posting all of data here, for you, but this (and  other information I will gather later) will be the basis for an article to be published on the hip pressure cooking website.

 

Max Temp at High Pressure Matrix

I ran the test following the testing matrix I set-up for all pressure cookers – the only deviation from that matrix is that I used a different stand for the remote logging monitor because the one I developed and used with other cookers could not fit in the Vitaquick– the base was too narrow and the base of the sling stopped mid-way up the cooker.

 

The matrix is as follows:

-Submerge monitor with approx. 2cm of water and ensure it does not come in contact with the base, sides or any other conductive material (the monitor is in a cotton sling)

-Bring the contents of the cooker to a rolling boil (without pressure lid) and then boil for 10 minutes to calibrate the monitor and ensure it is working properly.

-Add pressure cooking lid and bring cooker up to high pressure according to the manufacturer’s instructions

-Maintain high pressure (without going into over-pressure) according to the manufactuer’s instructions for 15 minutes

-Open the cooker, cool down the monitor and download the logging data

 

Here’s a a photo documentary of the test (also includes raw test data worksheet):
https://drive.google...RW8&usp=sharing

Ciao,

 

L

 

11_results_fissler_vitaquick_test.PNG


Edited by pazzaglia, 23 November 2013 - 03:38 AM.

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#502 pazzaglia

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Posted 23 November 2013 - 03:47 AM

P.S.  Here is a copy of the Fissler US Vitaquick manual:
http://www.hippressu...ker-manual-usa/

 

It was sent to me and uploaded with Fissler's permission.


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#503 ojisan

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Posted 23 November 2013 - 12:36 PM

OK, I got a chance to run the test this morning, and my findings are that the US Vitaquick’s operating pressure is consistent with what is printed in their manual 60kpa (8.7psi).

 

Here’s a a photo documentary of the test (also includes raw test data worksheet):
https://drive.google...RW8&usp=sharing

 

Thanks, Laura! I'm looking forward to the results of KR tests for comparison. I'll monitor your website.

 

I note in the photos that to achieve max pressure, the entire blue ring is exposed. In actual use, is it recommended to take it to overpressure and then back off?


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#504 pazzaglia

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Posted 23 November 2013 - 09:42 PM


I note in the photos that to achieve max pressure, the entire blue ring is exposed. In actual use, is it recommended to take it to overpressure and then back off?

 

 

Venting a spring-valve cooker is something that I learned from a Kuhn Rikon engineer that could be done with their pressure cookers to ensure ALL of the oxygen exits the cooker for niche uses - sterilization or canning - where maximum temperatures are important.

 

However, that is not recommended for daily use or even noted in the manufacturer's manual - because going into over-pressure is a safety feature.  I personally do not recommend anyone do this and and then depend on secondary or, in some cases, tertiary safety systems to keep the pressure where it should be.  The only exception would be if this action is recommended by the manufacturer (such as certain models from Fagor) or during the inevitable learning process. The Fissler manual does not recommend venting prior to pressure cooking.

 

It's important to note that today's high-quality pressure cookers already vent 90-95% of the oxygen when building pressure so that extra 5% will not make a significant difference in the cooking temperature.

 

During my test, the cooker did begin to vent, but that was just because it was my fist time using this cooker and I hadn't gotten the feel for the right heat to keep it at pressure. If you see from the temperature chart, I turned the heat down after building pressure but initially, it was not enough.

 

Ciao,

 

L


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#505 Earthlark

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Posted 25 November 2013 - 07:06 PM

OK, I got a chance to run the test this morning, and my findings are that the US Vitaquick’s operating pressure is consistent with what is printed in their manual 60kpa (8.7psi).

 

Thanks so much for testing and sharing your results!

 

Here's another response from Fissler USA that I just received:

All of Fissler pressure cookers operate at an average of 10 PSI at 1st level (of the indicator) and at an average of 15 PSI at the 2nd level.
According to Fissler, if you let the 2nd level rise higher, the cooker will reach up to 18 PSI. Because the US does not allow such high heats, at that temperature/level, the steam will automatically be released from your cooker as a safety measure.

In the manual, it states the lowest PSI of the range.
The Vitaquick operates at 9-11 PSI on the low setting and 13-15 PSI on the high setting.
The maximum PSI on the second cooking setting is 15 PSI.


It baffles me how Fissler could get things so mixed up, especially as it seems (according to reviews) that they make some high quality products.  But I suppose we're all entitled to mistakes once in a while.  :)  Still, I'd love to know why they engineered such a product for the US market (and then didn't communicate with the US branch the product specs).  Or did they make some production error and then try to pass the cooker off as a 15 psi cooker?  But then they wouldn't have written the specs in the manual.  Well, if you ever solve the mystery, Laura, and feel like sharing... :)

As much of a bother as it is, given all the the info (Laura's tests, Fissler's intercompany confusion, and ATK's apparent lack of expertise with PKs), I think I'll have to send this one back and go with the WMF Perfect Plus set.  I guess I'll have to rely on other means of cooking for Thanksgiving.  :)  Btw, that set happens to be on sale at the moment if anyone's interested--I suspect this is because they're out of stock... (It's less expensive than buying just the 8-1/2 quart PK individually.)


  • pazzaglia likes this

#506 Robenco15

Robenco15
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Posted 30 November 2013 - 10:08 AM

Hey all,

Typically my philosophy with cooking equipment is that bigger is better. I can always make less in a large vessel, but can never make more in a small vessel.

Is this a smart line of thinking for pressure cookers too? I only cook right now for myself and one other, but I'm more about thinking in the long term and not purchasing multiple things over the years. Buy one, buy the best, pay the most, and be done with it.

Anyway, this is the one I was thinking about - http://www.amazon.co...-quart stockpot

It calls it a 8 1/2 quart stockpot, but I'm pretty sure it is a pressure cooker. The name changes for each size.

Does anyone have any experience with this? Is it recommended? Is bigger better for pressure cookers? 8 and a half is the largest I'm going right now due to the size of my apartment.

Thanks for the opinions and help!



#507 ElsieD

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Posted 30 November 2013 - 10:47 AM

Hey all,
Typically my philosophy with cooking equipment is that bigger is better. I can always make less in a large vessel, but can never make more in a small vessel.
Is this a smart line of thinking for pressure cookers too? I only cook right now for myself and one other, but I'm more about thinking in the long term and not purchasing multiple things over the years. Buy one, buy the best, pay the most, and be done with it.
Anyway, this is the one I was thinking about - http://www.amazon.co...-quart stockpot
It calls it a 8 1/2 quart stockpot, but I'm pretty sure it is a pressure cooker. The name changes for each size.
Does anyone have any experience with this? Is it recommended? Is bigger better for pressure cookers? 8 and a half is the largest I'm going right now due to the size of my apartment.
Thanks for the opinions and help!


http://www.amazon.co...pressure cooker

This is the one I have and am very happy with it. If you get this set you get the best of both worlds.

#508 pazzaglia

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Posted 02 December 2013 - 05:16 AM

Does anyone have any experience with this? Is it recommended? Is bigger better for pressure cookers? 8 and a half is the largest I'm going right now due to the size of my apartment.

Thanks for the opinions and help!

 

Personally, I wouldn't go any larger - especially if you're cooking for just two.  A few months ago, I wrote a little article to answer your "is bigger better" question.  It explains the whats and why's along with a little chart that figures out how many servings of rice and soup you can get from each pressure cooker size:

 

Does pressure cooker size matter?  Of course!
http://www.hippressu...izes-and-types/

 

I recommend my readers to start with a 6 or 8L pressure cookers (the one you linked to is 8L - so, you're in!).   You can make 6 servings of rice or 16 cups of soup in that one.  Of course, the nice thing is that you can also make less without adjustments since you can still get away with adding just a cup of cooking liquid for most recipes with that size.

 

You chose a nice shape, too.  The pressure braisers are wide and have a larger browning area than your typical stockpot-shaped pressure cooker.  You made an excellent choice!

 

Ciao,

 

L


Edited by pazzaglia, 02 December 2013 - 05:18 AM.

hip pressure cooking - making pressure cooking hip, one recipe at a time!