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Do Brita-type filters work?


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42 replies to this topic

#31 KennethT

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Posted 07 January 2011 - 03:34 PM

Andie, I completely agree... unfortunately, I'm in a rental apartment, and while I'm not averse to doing some "renovating", I think installing an in-line system is not really in the cards for me. I've drilled holes in my poured-concrete ceiling to mount a pot rack, and other easily concealable things (necessary when we eventually move out), but I think there's really no way to hide a 1/2" hole drilled into my sink or countertop... So, for the forseeable future, I'm stuck with the expensive faucet mount version....

#32 andiesenji

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Posted 07 January 2011 - 04:29 PM

Andie, I completely agree... unfortunately, I'm in a rental apartment, and while I'm not averse to doing some "renovating", I think installing an in-line system is not really in the cards for me. I've drilled holes in my poured-concrete ceiling to mount a pot rack, and other easily concealable things (necessary when we eventually move out), but I think there's really no way to hide a 1/2" hole drilled into my sink or countertop... So, for the forseeable future, I'm stuck with the expensive faucet mount version....



For the basic inline filters you don't need to drill a hole in your sink. The filter goes onto the cold water line under the sink and you can take it out and take it with you when you move.
In my office, we had a reverse osmosis filter under the sink in the lab and when we moved to a new office we took it with us and put the original line back as it was.
Such an installation is not considered a "permanent" fixture.
"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett
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#33 David A. Goldfarb

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Posted 08 January 2011 - 06:19 AM

I've tried the PUR system in two different apartments, and I got all the special adapters that you have to order (they are free, but you have to send away for them), if the thing doesn't stay attached to your faucet, and we had a constant problem with the fixture blowing off the faucet. Maybe we were just unlucky, but I wouldn't bother with it again.

#34 andiesenji

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Posted 08 January 2011 - 10:13 AM

I've tried the PUR system in two different apartments, and I got all the special adapters that you have to order (they are free, but you have to send away for them), if the thing doesn't stay attached to your faucet, and we had a constant problem with the fixture blowing off the faucet. Maybe we were just unlucky, but I wouldn't bother with it again.



Also, these only work with standard faucets. If you have one of the pull-out faucets or one of the high volume faucets,or if your water pressure is above a certain level, they won't work.
"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett
My blog:Books,Cooks,Gadgets&Gardening

#35 KennethT

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Posted 08 January 2011 - 10:37 AM


Andie, I completely agree... unfortunately, I'm in a rental apartment, and while I'm not averse to doing some "renovating", I think installing an in-line system is not really in the cards for me. I've drilled holes in my poured-concrete ceiling to mount a pot rack, and other easily concealable things (necessary when we eventually move out), but I think there's really no way to hide a 1/2" hole drilled into my sink or countertop... So, for the forseeable future, I'm stuck with the expensive faucet mount version....



For the basic inline filters you don't need to drill a hole in your sink. The filter goes onto the cold water line under the sink and you can take it out and take it with you when you move.
In my office, we had a reverse osmosis filter under the sink in the lab and when we moved to a new office we took it with us and put the original line back as it was.
Such an installation is not considered a "permanent" fixture.

Wow! I looked at the installation instructions of the basic model of the link you provided, and it seemed like they were intending you to permanently install the included spigot. Maybe, instead of the spigot, I could use a hose/valve that I could stash under the sink when not in use? Is that what you're talking about? Otherwise, did the RO filter connect in between the cold water line/regular faucet full time?

#36 andiesenji

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Posted 08 January 2011 - 11:04 AM



Andie, I completely agree... unfortunately, I'm in a rental apartment, and while I'm not averse to doing some "renovating", I think installing an in-line system is not really in the cards for me. I've drilled holes in my poured-concrete ceiling to mount a pot rack, and other easily concealable things (necessary when we eventually move out), but I think there's really no way to hide a 1/2" hole drilled into my sink or countertop... So, for the forseeable future, I'm stuck with the expensive faucet mount version....



For the basic inline filters you don't need to drill a hole in your sink. The filter goes onto the cold water line under the sink and you can take it out and take it with you when you move.
In my office, we had a reverse osmosis filter under the sink in the lab and when we moved to a new office we took it with us and put the original line back as it was.
Such an installation is not considered a "permanent" fixture.

Wow! I looked at the installation instructions of the basic model of the link you provided, and it seemed like they were intending you to permanently install the included spigot. Maybe, instead of the spigot, I could use a hose/valve that I could stash under the sink when not in use? Is that what you're talking about? Otherwise, did the RO filter connect in between the cold water line/regular faucet full time?


Look at various brands of inline filters. most simply connect to the cold water line that goes to your sink faucet so when it is turned just to cold you get filtered water. If you have a single control "mixer" some filtered water will be mixed with the hot but it isn't a huge draw on the filter.

You shouldn't need a separate hose or a separate delivery system, just the regular faucet.

I'll look for the site that has detailed drawings for installing various types of filters. I know I have it bookmarked somewhere, just can't find it right now.
"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett
My blog:Books,Cooks,Gadgets&Gardening

#37 thock

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Posted 18 January 2011 - 03:58 PM

An odd law went into effect a year ago that keeps the Berkey filters from being sold in California. It is interesting that the movers behind the bill were bottled water companies so this whole thing is political, as far as I am concerned. The only other state that doesn't allow them is Iowa, I think. I get around it by having mine shipped to Nevada and drive over to get them.

I've written numerous letters and spoken to my state representatives but they profess to know nothing about it.


Andie,

I just came across this website that will ship to California. At the bottom of the page, you can see what they have to say about it...
Tracy
Lenexa, KS, USA

#38 Mjx

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Posted 19 January 2011 - 01:07 AM

For a couple of years I lived in a part of the city where the tap water tasted like it was piped in from a swimming pool, so I first used a Brita pitcher, then switched to a Pur faucet attachment. Both brands and models (I found the faucet-mounted model more convenient) did a fine job of removing the chlorine taste from the water: the difference was very pronounced. The only reason for the brand switch was that I was in an 'I want it NOW' mood when I went shopping for the faucet-mounted model, and and Bed Bath & Beyond only carried the Pur models of these.

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#39 Aloha Steve

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Posted 19 January 2011 - 11:50 AM

Got the Big Berky yesterday and have run a few galleons thru the filters to make sure they are primed correctly.
Later will try some. Stay tuned for a taste report.

Edited by Aloha Steve, 19 January 2011 - 11:50 AM.

[size="1"] edited for grammar & spelling. I do it 95% of my posts so I'll state it here. :)[/size]

[size="3"]"I have never developed indigestion from eating my words."-- Winston Churchill[/size]
[size="4"]Talk doesn't cook rice. ~ Chinese Proverb[/size]

#40 thock

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Posted 13 November 2012 - 09:58 AM

Andie,

I've had my Big Berkey for a while, now, and I noticed, a few weeks ago, that the spigot was leaking. The white washer on the outside was cracked. I replaced it with a rubber washer for a 5/8" hose, and had Warren tighten it. It worked well for about a week, but now if I turn the spigot handle, it's torquing the whole spigot such that the washer moves far enough away from the metal to allow water leakage.

I am not thrilled with their spigot, and I'm going to find a brass or stainless replacement, but I was wondering if you have had such issues.
Tracy
Lenexa, KS, USA

#41 andiesenji

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Posted 13 November 2012 - 10:42 AM

Andie,

I've had my Big Berkey for a while, now, and I noticed, a few weeks ago, that the spigot was leaking. The white washer on the outside was cracked. I replaced it with a rubber washer for a 5/8" hose, and had Warren tighten it. It worked well for about a week, but now if I turn the spigot handle, it's torquing the whole spigot such that the washer moves far enough away from the metal to allow water leakage.

I am not thrilled with their spigot, and I'm going to find a brass or stainless replacement, but I was wondering if you have had such issues.


I have a couple of extra spigots and I replace about every 4-5 years. They are not all that expensive. I'm sure you can find a stainless spigot too, I've just never bothered.
"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett
My blog:Books,Cooks,Gadgets&Gardening

#42 thock

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Posted 13 November 2012 - 07:29 PM

I've had my Berkey since about November 2008, so that's right in line with how often you replace your spigots. Thanks!
Tracy
Lenexa, KS, USA

#43 antdad

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Posted 15 November 2012 - 11:58 AM

Do Brita and equivalent water-filtration pitchers actually do anything?

I live in New York City, where the drinking water is reputed to be pretty good. I have, however, noticed some chlorine creep over the years -- or something my nose perceives as chlorine. The Brita filter does seem to remove this odor, but I've never tested the theory blindfolded.

A quick Google search didn't yield much useful information.

Does anyone have the 411 on these things? My understanding is that when you divide the cost of filters you get a cost of about 20 cents (US) per gallon of water from the Brita. So that's not completely trivial. I'd like to be sure it's worth it.


Yes they do but they work like any other activated charcoal filtration system. I too have chlorine taint that it removed and there is also slight softening of the water so my kettle scaling is also significantly reduced. I've now installed an in line filtration system and depending on use only costs me about $15 per cartridge per year.

Edited by antdad, 15 November 2012 - 12:00 PM.