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All about "sous vide" eggs

Modernist

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162 replies to this topic

#151 seabream

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Posted 10 February 2013 - 09:06 PM

nickrey - Do you recommend your egg topper? What brand is it?

I am still unable to peel sous vide eggs (it's getting ridiculous that I can make the perfect sous vide egg but can't peel it...) I tried adding baking soda to the water in the ratio recommended by Harold McGee, I tried using an egg on its expiration date, I tried both an old egg with baking soda in the water, and I tried the vinegar solution trick. The peel came out better in these experiments than fresh eggs in plain water, but I still can't get my eggs to peel without cracking in a few places. I'm now thinking that I need to improve on my peeling technique.

I usually crack the egg on both eggs with a spoon, and then use my hands to remove the shell in the ends. I then crack the egg all around, either on the counter or with the spoon, and proceed to remove the bits of shell. As I remove some of the shell, pieces of egg white stick to it and lead to cracks in the egg.

Would an egg topper help remove shell without the cracking the white? Any other peeling techniques that I should try?

#152 nickrey

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Posted 10 February 2013 - 11:47 PM

I can't guarantee this for quail's eggs but it works very well for hen's eggs. It looks like this:

egg topper.jpg

Place the egg pointy end down on a hard surface. Place the bottom part over the top of the egg. Raise plunger and let it drop. This gives a line around the top of the egg that makes easy to peel the top off. As I said in the earlier post, it normally leaves a small hole in the pointy end of the egg as well. Push gently in this hole and the egg will come easily out of the top hole.

I bought it on line in Australia but am sure you can find it on Amazon easily enough.

Nick Reynolds, aka "nickrey"

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Unless there are three other people." Orson Welles
My eG Foodblog


#153 EnriqueB

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Posted 11 February 2013 - 04:29 AM

OK, here is a new version with egg size used.

Great, thanks!!

#154 EnriqueB

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Posted 11 February 2013 - 04:33 AM

Any other peeling techniques that I should try?

In Modernist Cuisine they propose to torch the egg surface for about 2 minutes, turning the egg often with tongs so it does not burn in any point. I have tried a couple of times and never really got it to work, also found it not very convenient and too slow for many eggs at once. Has someone successfully tried this technique?

I use an egg topper like the one in nickrey's picture.

#155 FeChef

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Posted 11 February 2013 - 08:46 AM


Again, whats the maximum depth the polyscience can drop into a container?


On my Chef's Series, its about 7.5" from the bracket to the bottom of the housing, the bottom of the heating element recessed maybe 1/8" up from the bottom of the housing.

Omar


Thank you.

#156 seabream

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Posted 11 February 2013 - 12:37 PM

nickrey and EnriqueB - Thanks for the egg topper info. I am thinking of getting this one: http://www.amazon.co...ords=egg topper

In Modernist Cuisine they propose to torch the egg surface for about 2 minutes, turning the egg often with tongs so it does not burn in any point. I have tried a couple of times and never really got it to work, also found it not very convenient and too slow for many eggs at once. Has someone successfully tried this technique?


Interesting... but what is the rationale behind torching the egg? Aren't warm eggs harder to peel than cold eggs?

#157 demo5

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Posted 12 February 2013 - 02:18 PM

I have an idea that requires using a quail's egg where the white is firm like a hard boiled egg but the yolk is basically completely raw/liquid. Does anyone have an idea of what times, temps and techniques are needed to achieve this?

Thanks.

#158 FeChef

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Posted 12 February 2013 - 06:25 PM

I have an idea that requires using a quail's egg where the white is firm like a hard boiled egg but the yolk is basically completely raw/liquid. Does anyone have an idea of what times, temps and techniques are needed to achieve this?

Thanks.


If you want the yoke raw but the white hard boiled i would just get a pot of water to a rolling boil and add the eggs straight from the fridge and cook for 7-10 minutes. Then immediatley chill in ice water to stop the cooking process. You may want to test one egg at a time between 7-10 minutes to find the sweet spot.

#159 nickrey

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Posted 12 February 2013 - 11:15 PM

7-10 minutes for quails eggs is going to give you very chewy yellows.

Bring a large saucepan of water to the boil, add quail eggs, boil for exactly 1 minute and 40 seconds. Take from water, place immediately into ice water to stop cooking.

I did 36 eggs for a scotch egg appetiser this way and they were perfectly cooked on the white and runny in the middle.

Nick Reynolds, aka "nickrey"

"My doctor told me to stop having intimate dinners for four.
Unless there are three other people." Orson Welles
My eG Foodblog


#160 FeChef

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Posted 13 February 2013 - 08:15 AM

7-10 minutes for quails eggs is going to give you very chewy yellows.

Bring a large saucepan of water to the boil, add quail eggs, boil for exactly 1 minute and 40 seconds. Take from water, place immediately into ice water to stop cooking.

I did 36 eggs for a scotch egg appetiser this way and they were perfectly cooked on the white and runny in the middle.


Yeah sorry. I was referring to large eggs. in my tests, 5 minutes wasnt enough to hard boil the whites. Ive had Quail before, but never had or even seen a quail egg so no idea how big they are.

#161 demo5

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Posted 20 February 2013 - 12:24 PM

Thank you for the help.  1:40 was perfect.



#162 bhsimon

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Posted 06 August 2013 - 02:09 AM

...Thinking about a restaurant situation or any time consistency and volume are called for, I wondered whether either of these two approaches may work to have an egg whose white was firm with yolk at desired consistency:

 

1. Eggs into a 55°C bath to equalise. Hold there until required. This brings the egg to a known internal temperature closer to the final temp without setting either yolk or white. If held long enough, they will be pasteurised. Then, in a separate bath at, say, 90–95°C, drop egg for required time (depends on size) for the yolk to reach desired consistency. The time would range between 5 and 7 minutes, depending on final yolk temp and egg size (which would need to be established before calculations could be done; I use SousVide Dash).

 

2. Egg is first in a 62–64°C bath (depending on desired yolk consistency) and held until equilibrium is reached, then moved to 55°C bath to be held until needed. This should halt the cooking of the yolk and stabilise the internal temp. When required, the egg goes into 90°C bath for just long enough to set the white. The idea is to use the 62–64°C water bath to set the yolks, which are then cooled a little and held before being moved to the hotter bath to set the whites.

 

Is there any practical limit to how long an egg can be held at 55°C? Say, for example, you were cooking breakfast eggs for a bunch of guests, could you put them into the bath the night before to be held for 8–12 hours?

 

We need some fabulous eGulleter with 2 or 3 water baths to try out these approaches. The timing is critical because the internal temp of the egg will be rising rapidly at the moment of completion because of the temperature difference between core and water bath. The best way would be to directly transfer them back to the 55°C water bath so they don't cool down completely but the temp will be below both yolk and white setting temps.

 

(Oh my, 3 water baths for eggs. Sometimes I wonder...)



#163 Robert Jueneman

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Posted 11 August 2013 - 01:50 PM

I would strongly recommend approach #2, but wich a slight modification. I would set the yolk at the desired consistency, then chill the egg in ice wtr, and save until needed. Then drop then in near boiling water just long enough to set the white, before serving. 

 

You can try holding thm at 55C, but I would be afraid they would continue to get firmer, which I don't think you want. But try it, and let us know.

 

From a bacterial safety perspective,holding them at 55C would be safe, as would holding them at close to 0C, but nothing in between.

 

Bob







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