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Sous Vide: Recipes, Techniques & Equipment (Part 8)

Modernist

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#571 EnriqueB

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Posted 27 May 2013 - 11:46 PM

(...) In the chill stage you can hold for 2 days (their time, i've done a bit longer), which is very handy.

 

Given the profile (50ºC for 30 minutes), they are not pasteurized and should be considered equivalent to raw. If I understand correctly, most safety guidelines would claim this to be apt only for inmediate consumption?



#572 Mofassah

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Posted 28 May 2013 - 12:32 AM

The problem with frozen seafood, is that it releases it's juice when it thaws, but I have a way of poaching frozen cod that saves the succulence and which may very well be worth a try with scallops too. I will vacuum seal them when they are still frozen, and dunk the bag in boiling water for 10 seconds before putting them in the sous vide bath. This technique is often used to kill off bacterias on the surface of meat before long time cooking, but it also kinda seals off the outer layer of cells, and help the delicate scallop to hold it's juice.

 

(Yeah, I know many people say that searing wont help a steak hold on to it's juice, but my taste buds are not lying to me, it does help my fish to stay juicy).



#573 EnriqueB

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Posted 28 May 2013 - 01:58 AM

The problem with frozen seafood, is that it releases it's juice when it thaws, but I have a way of poaching frozen cod that saves the succulence and which may very well be worth a try with scallops too. I will vacuum seal them when they are still frozen, and dunk the bag in boiling water for 10 seconds before putting them in the sous vide bath. This technique is often used to kill off bacterias on the surface of meat before long time cooking, but it also kinda seals off the outer layer of cells, and help the delicate scallop to hold it's juice.

 

(Yeah, I know many people say that searing wont help a steak hold on to it's juice, but my taste buds are not lying to me, it does help my fish to stay juicy).

 

That's a good technique, but take into account that killing bacteria requires the surface to achieve a given temperature for a given time. Dunking for 10 seconds is usually recommended when starting from fridge temperature, I hesitate that pasteurization is achieved using the same short time when you start from frozen...

 

About the other part, enough to say that my blog is titled "Dorar no sella los jugos", which means "searing does not seal in juices" in Spanish...



#574 nickrey

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Posted 28 May 2013 - 02:24 AM

The problem with frozen seafood, is that it releases it's juice when it thaws, but I have a way of poaching frozen cod that saves the succulence and which may very well be worth a try with scallops too. I will vacuum seal them when they are still frozen, and dunk the bag in boiling water for 10 seconds before putting them in the sous vide bath. This technique is often used to kill off bacterias on the surface of meat before long time cooking, but it also kinda seals off the outer layer of cells, and help the delicate scallop to hold it's juice.

 

(Yeah, I know many people say that searing wont help a steak hold on to it's juice, but my taste buds are not lying to me, it does help my fish to stay juicy).

 

That's a good technique, but take into account that killing bacteria requires the surface to achieve a given temperature for a given time. Dunking for 10 seconds is usually recommended when starting from fridge temperature, I hesitate that pasteurization is achieved using the same short time when you start from frozen...

 

About the other part, enough to say that my blog is titled "Dorar no sella los jugos", which means "searing does not seal in juices" in Spanish...

And I hope you are using vacuum bags that are specifically made for boiling.  Most of the bags are only rated to 90C.


Nick Reynolds, aka "nickrey"

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Unless there are three other people." Orson Welles
My eG Foodblog


#575 rotuts

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Posted 28 May 2013 - 03:53 AM

are mylar bags rated over 100 ?  these are used in chamber vacs as they have no 'textured' single surface for a reg. vacuum system to channel the air out.  there is a trick that allows you to used them in a plain vacuum sealer though.



#576 Paul Kierstead

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Posted 28 May 2013 - 05:04 AM

Great to know, thanks!  Basting in butter sounds like a great step, I'll try that next.  I have tried searing them in butter but it burns too easily.

They suggest to stop basting when the butter stops foaming,which is basically when the water is gone and the temp of the butter temperature will shoot up. You can go a little further then this, but you might get browned butter, which is a nice flavour but may or may not be what is desired.

#577 furzzy

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Posted 01 June 2013 - 08:29 AM

Great to know, thanks!  Basting in butter sounds like a great step, I'll try that next.  I have tried searing them in butter but it burns too easily.  But I love the taste of butter and it should also promote the maillard reactions that brown the scallops - I once tried dusting the chilled scallops in powdered milk before searing them to see if that helped them caramelise (after seeing Heston do it with chicken wings) but it didn't seem to do much.  Basting in butter after they've been seared sounds like the best of all worlds...


I learned to press them very gently into superfine sugar before browning. Since creating the Maillard effect give them a "sweeter" taste, it doesn't make a difference in taste, of, if it does, it just makes it better.

Then brown/sear in clarified butter or ghee, ands baste with the same. I promise, these will be the best scallops you've ever had. In fact, you'll probably need to buy more than usual because they're so good!

 

[Moderator note: This topic continues here, Sous Vide: Recipes, Techniques & Equipment (Part 9)]


Edited by Mjx, 19 January 2014 - 05:35 PM.
Moderator note added.






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