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Having Steel-Cut Irish Oats Ready in the Morning

Breakfast

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60 replies to this topic

#31 Chris Amirault

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Posted 17 November 2010 - 02:57 PM

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#32 llc45

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Posted 18 November 2010 - 06:40 PM

I made too much oatmeal this week as I forgot my husband would be away Mon-Weds so had a bunch to use up. I normally will throw into a baked good or a meatloaf but also had some leftover asian chicken to use up. So I made a really quick "asian" soup (almost a porridge) with chicken stock, onion, broccoli, carrot, sesame oil, the leftover chicken and the steel cut oats, with ginger, garlic, and crushed pepper. Never tried to use it like this before but it was actually very good. It really worked the same way as leftover rice.

Wondering if anyone else has ideas for savory recipes as I probably make too much at least once a month.

#33 lmarshal1

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Posted 19 November 2010 - 08:39 AM

I use my slow cooker on low heat, spray the inside with cooking spray, add one cup steel-cut oats to 3 1/2 cups water, add one apple cut up in small bits, and two tablespoons of brown sugar. I start it about 11 PM and it's ready by 6 AM. It's also good with raisins and cut-up dried apricots or dried cranberries or chopped nuts. lkm

#34 Chris Amirault

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Posted 19 November 2010 - 09:12 AM

Round two: 3:1 water:oats, some salt and sugar, and Zojirushi set to be done at 7a: perfect.

Overnight cooking was ok but not great; later that evening (about 20 hours after they were originally cooked) they had gotten slimy. Best to get them into the fridge shortly after having been cooked if you want that toothy bite.
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#35 Kouign Aman

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Posted 23 November 2010 - 05:24 PM

?You left them in the rice cooker for 20 hours?
I assume I misunderstand?
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#36 Chris Amirault

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Posted 23 November 2010 - 05:55 PM

Yep: left 'em on by accident. Dumb.
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#37 Borgstrom

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Posted 23 November 2010 - 07:14 PM

?You left them in the rice cooker for 20 hours?
I assume I misunderstand?


I've actually kept them warm as long as 72 hours. It stays above 140F in Keep Warm mode, so there is no risk of bacterial growth. The oatmeal tends to dry out after that long even with the lid closed, so I increase the water ratio a bit. I suppose I could (should?) just refrigerate and re-heat, but I got lazy once and left them in and found it didn't taste too bad.

#38 Soup

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Posted 25 November 2010 - 02:08 PM

Can oats be prepared so there is no trace of slime (this is the one texture that brings on the gag reflex for me).

#39 Chris Amirault

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Posted 26 November 2010 - 06:17 AM

Prepared with the porridge setting as discussed above (3.5 cups water to 1 cup oats), they have no slime.
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#40 nakji

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Posted 26 November 2010 - 04:55 PM

This time of year, I prepare them the night before in a pot on the stove. When they're done, I leave the lid off until they're cool, then pop it on before I go to bed. There's no heat in my kitchen, so it gets pretty cold in there, and I'm not bothered about having them in the fridge. In the morning, I add a splash of hot water from the kettle, and heat them up on the burner for about five minutes.

It's a practical solution if you don't have a rice cooker or slow cooker, like me.

#41 Soup

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Posted 27 November 2010 - 06:08 PM

No luck still. used both the rice cooker and slow cooker method. gluey and slimy. Had to really concentrate to get it down. Still looking for a good way to cooking.

I do love those little nibblets you get with steel cut oats. reminds me of tapeoka pearles.

#42 Chris Amirault

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Posted 28 November 2010 - 09:23 AM

Can you give us more details? Brand of oats? Ratio of water to oats? Salt or no?
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#43 janeer

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Posted 28 November 2010 - 08:14 PM

I just bought tried McCann's "5 minute" steel-cut oats--literally 5 minutes in the microwave--and they are not bad. A slightly softer version of the original. I may try cooking them 4 minutes.

#44 mkayahara

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Posted 15 January 2013 - 07:25 AM

I was recently looking up cooking times for pressure-cooked steel-cut oats in Modernist Cuisine at Home, and noticed that they give a cooking time of 12-15 minutes for stove-top cooking (and 7 minutes for pressure cooking). Remembering this thread, I wondered why an overnight cook would be necessary if they take only 15 minutes in the morning. So what gives? Are people really that pressed for time in the morning, or are the MCaH folks low-balling the cooking time?
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#45 Chris Amirault

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Posted 15 January 2013 - 07:28 AM

I think 12-15m is low-ball, and it requires some attention at the stove. I have the time but not the attention, most school mornings! Set it and forget it the night before, to me, is the biggest benefit for that reason.
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#46 boudin noir

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Posted 15 January 2013 - 07:54 AM

I bring them to a boil for a minute the night before. Then let them stand uncovered overnight. Then they will cook in about 5 minutes in the am.

#47 Raamo

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Posted 15 January 2013 - 07:57 AM

This is covered in the latest season of America's Test Kitchen, I've not seen the episode but I have the cookbook.

They found if you boil 3 cups of water to 1 of oats first w/o the oats in the pot and then add the oats to the hot water off the heat and let sit over night you get the best combination of softness w/o the gummyness. I've done this ~4x since we got the book, the next morning you add 1 cup of liquid to the oats and cook to finish. It works very very well, you can even add other things with the liquid to get all kinds of yummy flavors.

#48 Baselerd

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Posted 15 January 2013 - 11:37 AM

Not quite as sophisticated as some of the other approaches here, but I've had great luck just throwing all the ingredients into a slow cooker and cooking overnight.

#49 Joe Blowe

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Posted 15 January 2013 - 01:31 PM

...I wondered why an overnight cook would be necessary if they take only 15 minutes in the morning.

FWIW, I use the *timer function* on my rice cooker when making steel-cut oats for the morning. It only turns on about an hour before serving time.

Why people feel the need to cook them overnight in a crock pot, I do not know...
So we finish the eighteenth and he's gonna stiff me. And I say, "Hey, Lama, hey, how about a little something, you know, for the effort, you know." And he says, "Oh, uh, there won't be any money. But when you die, on your deathbed, you will receive total consciousness."

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#50 Katie Meadow

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Posted 15 January 2013 - 03:48 PM

Different cuts will take different amounts of time. I use Bob's steel cut oats They seem relatively coarse, and would break your teeth if they cooked for only 15 minutes. Pinhead Scottish Oats in the can take slightly less time but cost a lot more money. The Irish oats in a can may be a bit finer grind, but truthfully it has been ages since I tried those. I don't do any prep overnight, just cook in the morning. Bring 3 c water to a boil, add salt and 2/3 cup oats to serve two. Simmer uncovered 30 min, stirring often toward the end. Turn off the heat amd cover, let stand another 5 minutes. We're talkin' close to 45 minutes from the time you enter the kitchen, so not great if you are looking for a shortcut.

#51 mkayahara

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Posted 15 January 2013 - 05:34 PM

Thanks to all for your informative replies. So, next question: Has anyone tried pressure-cooking them?
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#52 MelissaH

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Posted 16 January 2013 - 07:40 AM

I'm not awake enough to use my pressure cooker for anything in the morning.

Thanks to all for your informative replies. So, next question: Has anyone tried pressure-cooking them?


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#53 Raamo

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Posted 16 January 2013 - 07:51 AM

from ATK: After soaking overnight in what was hot water, add 1 cup more and cook for 4-6 mins till it looks like hot porridge then rest for 5 mins. Can't get much easier then that and it's faster then a pressure cooker in the morning.

#54 Katie Meadow

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Posted 16 January 2013 - 12:40 PM

Raamo, when you start the soak what proportions do you use?

#55 Raamo

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Posted 16 January 2013 - 02:42 PM

Raamo, when you start the soak what proportions do you use?


3 water / 1 oats

The water boils 1st, then the oats go in with a little salt off the heat. This sits over night and is safe as it's just salt, oats and water.

Is there copyright issues if I put the entire recipe here but not the pretext etc? It's from the latest season of ATK. In the recipe pretext they discuss why they don't add to boiling on the heat, or in a crockpot etc.

Edited by Raamo, 16 January 2013 - 02:43 PM.


#56 JTravel

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Posted 16 January 2013 - 05:57 PM

I just cooked Aldi's brand (Millville?) this week. It said at least a 6 cup bowl and mine was bigger. 1/2 cup oats, 3 cups water.
5 minutes, stirred, after that (2md 5 minutes) they boiled up and went over and all down the side of bowl. What a mess.
But what was left I cooked in pot on stove and they were wonderful. Think I will stick to stovetop, perhaps with prepping night before. I'll be doing them again...and excuse to eat plump raisins.

#57 GlorifiedRice

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Posted 17 January 2013 - 07:28 AM

I made too much oatmeal this week as I forgot my husband would be away Mon-Weds so had a bunch to use up. I normally will throw into a baked good or a meatloaf but also had some leftover asian chicken to use up. So I made a really quick "asian" soup (almost a porridge) with chicken stock, onion, broccoli, carrot, sesame oil, the leftover chicken and the steel cut oats, with ginger, garlic, and crushed pepper. Never tried to use it like this before but it was actually very good. It really worked the same way as leftover rice.

Wondering if anyone else has ideas for savory recipes as I probably make too much at least once a month.



There was a post on Serious Eats awhile back about SAVORY OATMEAL being the new thing. They made Oats with Sriracha and Eggs...
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#58 mkayahara

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Posted 17 January 2013 - 07:36 AM


I made too much oatmeal this week as I forgot my husband would be away Mon-Weds so had a bunch to use up. I normally will throw into a baked good or a meatloaf but also had some leftover asian chicken to use up. So I made a really quick "asian" soup (almost a porridge) with chicken stock, onion, broccoli, carrot, sesame oil, the leftover chicken and the steel cut oats, with ginger, garlic, and crushed pepper. Never tried to use it like this before but it was actually very good. It really worked the same way as leftover rice.

Wondering if anyone else has ideas for savory recipes as I probably make too much at least once a month.



There was a post on Serious Eats awhile back about SAVORY OATMEAL being the new thing. They made Oats with Sriracha and Eggs...

And indeed, the first reference I saw to pressure-cooked steel-cut oats was in VOLT ink., where it's used in a savoury oatmeal recipe with mushrooms, brown butter and beer.
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#59 mkayahara

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Posted 17 January 2013 - 08:03 AM

Now, having tried pressure-cooked steel-cut oats this morning, I can say that I don't think it saves on time, when you factor in how long it takes to come up to pressure and then come back down to ambient pressure, but it does save on the "stirring and watching" part.

I put half a cup of McCann's oats in a bowl with a pinch of salt, a handful of raisins and 2 cups of water, set the bowl on a trivet in the pressure cooker, and filled the cooker with water to come halfway up the sides of the bowl. Brought it to high pressure, held it there for 5 and a half minutes, then let the pressure dissipate naturally. Stirred and served, with a sprinkle of chopped walnuts and a drizzle of maple syrup. I would say it was both a little fluid and a little chewy, so I'll scale back on the water a touch next time, and up the cooking time to 7 minutes.
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#60 rotuts

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Posted 17 January 2013 - 09:30 AM

I cook my steel-cut oats with milk, and therefore use a Fuzzy rice cooker on porridge. simple. no scorching.

the idea came from this book:

http://www.amazon.co...ate rice cooker

I reheat the refrigerated left overs with a little milk in the microwave.

then add the add-ins.





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