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Cooking with Dorie Greenspan's "Around my French Table"

Cookbook French

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195 replies to this topic

#181 Genkinaonna

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Posted 09 November 2011 - 07:23 PM

I just found a brand new copy at my library's annual book sale for $10.00...I already have one, but it's on item checked off my "must buy for christmas gift" list.
If you ate pasta and antipasto, would you still be hungry? ~Author Unknown

#182 pikawicca

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Posted 09 November 2011 - 07:28 PM

Gougeres are not puff pastry.

#183 LindaK

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Posted 10 November 2011 - 05:29 AM

Gougeres are not puff pastry.

True, but they are often called "puffs" which is how I interpreted the mention above.

Dorie's recipe is a good one, though calling for a standing mixer to beat in the eggs seems like a lot of unnecessary clean-up work. I've always beaten them in by hand, directly in the pan in which I cooked the dough, using my favorite wooden spoon (and lots of elbow grease) and gotten perfect results.


 


#184 Derek J

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Posted 10 November 2011 - 07:34 AM

Gougeres are not puff pastry.

Then I must be confused. I thought puff pastry is synonymous with pate a choux and that the gougeres are made with pate a choux.

#185 janeer

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Posted 10 November 2011 - 08:37 PM


Gougeres are not puff pastry.

Then I must be confused. I thought puff pastry is synonymous with pate a choux and that the gougeres are made with pate a choux.

Good heavens, yes, you are confused. No relation.

#186 LindaK

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Posted 10 November 2011 - 09:08 PM

Derek,

Pâte à choux is used for gougere, cream puffs, etc. and is a batter/paste spooned or piped into shapes before baking.

Pâte Feuilletée (puff pastry) is a multilayered pastry that is rolled into sheets before use. No eggs. A different thing altogether from pâte à choux.

Dorie's book uses puff pastry in a few recipes, but calls for frozen store bought. If you want to understand how it's made, read Julia or other classic texts on French cooking.


 


#187 Derek J

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Posted 13 November 2011 - 02:11 PM

Thank you very much for the correction and information!

#188 BarbaraY

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Posted 25 December 2011 - 01:45 PM

Since there are just two for Christmas dinner I'm making Dorie's Curried Chicken, Peppers and Peas. So simple but so delicious.

#189 jamesglu

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Posted 11 January 2012 - 12:00 PM

I have been making the Salmon in a Jar for months now, serving it regularly to guests as a starter (often with a small mixture of greens from the garden underneath) to rave reviews. I wonder, though, if it's possible to reuse the olive oil from either the salmon or the potato jar, whether for another batch of the same or for something else? Any ideas?

#190 LindaK

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Posted 12 January 2012 - 05:56 AM

That's a recipe I haven't tried, but it sounds like I ought to.

Dorie's introductory notes in the recipe suggest reusing the oils, either for cooking or for a vinaigrette, mayonnaise, etc. I might hesitate to use the oil from the cured salmon unless I planned on cooking with it. Here's a topic that I would read through first: Botulism concerns re infused oils and confit


 


#191 jamesglu

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Posted 12 January 2012 - 11:33 PM

Shortly after I wrote my post I re-read the intro notes in the book and saw the answer right there, so sorry for not editing the post in time! And it's because of the botulism fear that I was reluctant to use the oil again.

And you should definitely try the recipe--it's a real winner!

#192 Derek J

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Posted 26 September 2012 - 10:49 AM

I cracked this book open again over the weekend and I'm gearing up to start making some more recipes. I tried the pumpkin-gorgonzola flan last night. I'm sad to say it was pretty awful. I think that's due to two factors: (1) the dish just wasn't suited to my tastes/preferences; and (2) I probably used too much salt. The recipe just calls for S&P without any quantification. I've got a good feel for how much seasoning to use with meats, but I was at a loss as to proper seasoning for a blender full of pumpkin, eggs, and cream. The final product was just disappointing until I tried it with the sour cream as recommended. That unleashed something simply awful on my taste buds. I have much higher hopes for the next recipe I'll try on Saturday.

#193 FrogPrincesse

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Posted 23 January 2013 - 01:37 PM

I made the Pumpkin Stuffed with Everything Good. I used a relatively small carnival squash from my CSA (2 pounds I think?), and about 1/2 of the stuffing recipe (reducing the relative amount of bread somewhat). The squash did not render any liquid, so the end result was not "bubbly" as she described. For some reason, I expected a softer consistency, almost like a puree. It was soft enough to cut into slices but still maintained some integrity. I thought that it was pretty tasty.

Before
Posted Image


After
Posted Image

Note: even with a small squash, there was way too much for 2 people.

Edited by FrogPrincesse, 23 January 2013 - 01:40 PM.


#194 djyee100

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Posted 24 January 2013 - 01:13 PM

... I probably used too much salt. The recipe just calls for S&P without any quantification. I've got a good feel for how much seasoning to use with meats, but I was at a loss as to proper seasoning for a blender full of pumpkin, eggs, and cream.


Derek J, when I am faced with this situation I put a little of the mixture in a ramekin, and nuke it in the microwave to cook it. Then I taste it. The microwaved version will not taste exactly like the final dish, but it gets me in the ballpark for seasoning and other adjustments. Also, when seasoning eggs, my rule of thumb is one pinch of salt per raw egg.

#195 Derek J

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Posted 24 January 2013 - 01:55 PM


... I probably used too much salt. The recipe just calls for S&P without any quantification. I've got a good feel for how much seasoning to use with meats, but I was at a loss as to proper seasoning for a blender full of pumpkin, eggs, and cream.


Derek J, when I am faced with this situation I put a little of the mixture in a ramekin, and nuke it in the microwave to cook it. Then I taste it. The microwaved version will not taste exactly like the final dish, but it gets me in the ballpark for seasoning and other adjustments. Also, when seasoning eggs, my rule of thumb is one pinch of salt per raw egg.

That is some damn useful advice. Thanks!

#196 Okanagancook

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Posted 25 December 2013 - 12:10 PM

Stumbled across this blog about cooking with AMFT http://www.eatlivetr...orie-greenspan/





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